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Full text of "The Tiger (student newspaper), Sept. 1930-June 1931"

Colorado College Library 



LibratY No AJ> 76.J? 



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THE 



TIGCR 



Colorado College 



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VOJLX/ME^ VII. 



15, 1904 

J^umber 1. 



4><i*«f4>4i4»«i>*ii<i*4*4>4>4*4»<i>4*4*4*4>4><i>4*4*4»4*4*'i*<i*4*4**»4*4»<i*4>4*4»4*4*4»4»4*4>*i> 



Special Rates to Students 

On Rented Pianos 



4^ 

♦ 

4» 
* 
4* 

4* 
4* 
4> 

4* 

4* Hew Lennox Block 
4- 

* 




The KNIGHT - GHMPBELL 
Music Company 



opposite North Park 



St. John Bros.r'™*'™'"' 

Gas and Steam Fitters 

Hot Water Heating a Specialty 

Prompt attention given to Repair Work. 

(Eurtis goal go. 

Office 132 N. Tejon St. Telephone 91. 

Try "NEW RANGE" for the Kitchen, $4.00. 
BiTUMNOUS Goal at Standard Prices. 

SELDOMRIDGE BROTHERS, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

Flour, Feed, Grain, Hay and Seeds 

108 South Tejon Street 

Repairing while You Wait Satisfaction Guaranteed 

A complete plant of New Machinery for 
the Manufacture of Fine Boots and Shoes 

The Lightning Shoe Shop 

BROWN & COMPANY 
We make a specialty of Shoes to Measure and Shoes for 
Cripples. 28V^ NorthTejon St. CoiiOBADo Springs 

Visiting Cards in latest Styles, 

WE SHOW gy advertising in THE TiGER that we 
lUU........... appreciate your custom. 

/^^ 22 E. Kiowa St. The Prompt Printer j 
The 

Hasseli Iron Works Co. 



Founders and Machinests 



2l/e 7l/elcome 



THE STUDENTS, 

new and old, at our studio, 

Corner Cascade and Kiowa 




"^^Sr^lBT/UM t 



Dealer in Kodaks and Supplies. 



COLLEGE GOWNS, CAPS 

The Best Workmanship 
at Lowest Prices 

Silk Faculty Gowns and Hoods 




COX SONS & VININfi 

262 Fourth Avenue., NEW YORK 



F©©T BHLLS 

Pants» Nose Guards, 
Tennis Goods 
and Sweaters 



at Strangs 

119 Xorth Tejon Street 



Mueth's 

Soda,: Ice eream 

eATERING 

CHAS. T. FERTIG 

9^ea/ Estate, Loans and Insurance 

29 N. Tejon Street 

ZPAe Coiarado ^prin^s floral Co* 

FLORISTS 



/O^ T^ortA 77»/on Sfrvmf 



USE ELECTRIC LIGHT 
IN YOUR HOMES 



The Colorado Springs Electric Co. 



4>4»4*4'4*4>4*4*4>«l*<l*4i4>4*«i>4*4*4»4»4*4>4*4*4»4*4*4*«i>*i*'i*4*4*4>4*4»4*4*«i>i^4»4»4» 



4* 



THE TJGBR 



Student's Book Store Books, stationery; an Engi- 
neer's Supplies; College Pins 



and Watch Fobs, 
and up. 



Century Fountain Pens $1 to $4, Waterman's $2.50 

REYER & PLATT. 



ERouRfEE The ANTLERS PRESSING and CLEANING CO. no. 5 w.st H«.rfa.o 

Strict Attention, Good Work, Fair Prices, Prompt Delivery. Your orders solicited. Ladies and Gentle- 
men's work carefully done. I Also do Tailoring and Alterations. 



THE COLORADO SPRINGS CO, 

The Original Locators of 

Colorado Springs and 7?fanitou 

is still offering for sdle choice 
lots on North Weber Street 
and North Wahsatch Avenue 

Also lots for sale in other parts of Colorado Springs 
and in Manitou 

Apply at ROOM 8, OUTWEST BUILDING 



L©UIS ST©eK 



steam Dye and Cleaning 
Works 



Office and Works, 115 N. Tejon St. 

TELEPHONE 517-B 

Cleaning, Dyeing, Scouring in all its branches 

Ostrich Plumes Cleaned, Dyed and Curled 

Kid Gloves Dyed and Cleaned. 

GIDDINGS BROS, 

fine dress goods and ladies' 
Tailor Suits, Ladies' 
Furnishings 

Kiowa and Tejon Streets. 

CHARLES P. BENNETT 

Real Estate, Loans 
and Insurances ^ 

NO. 5 PIKE'S PEAK AVENUE 

GEO. BRINK COMPANY 

COFFEE ROASTERS 
Wholesale Teas, Spices, 
Extracts, Baking Powders 

I J E. Kiowa St. Phone Main 779 Colorado Springs 

THE HEFLEY-ARCILARIIS DRIG CO. 
Druddists 

Kodaks, Cameras and all kinds of Photographic 
Supplies. Developing and Printing for Amatuers. 
Free Delivery. 
Phone 144 21 South Tejon Street 



Fine Rooms for College 
Students. 1 16 E. Boulder 

ROOMS for Students of College. 
Strictly Modern, rates reasonable. 

6i6 N. Weber. 

A. G. SPAILDING 
& BROS. 



Athletic Outfitters. 

HENRY TAMR^ 

Druggist 

PRESCRIPTIONS 
TOILET ARTICLES 
STATIONERY 

All Popular Drinks Served 
at our Soda Fountain 

Plaza Hotel, Cor. Cache la Poudre & Tejon Sts. 

THE RUGBY^PRIMROSE COAL CO. 

All Kinds of Fuel 

Phone 481-A West 44-A 21 N. TEJON ST 



H. KRAIVZ 



poReELaiN 
H. KRHNZ & 



Only S Chair Barber Shop in the City 

lOftH E. Plke*s Peak ftve. 



BaTH TUBS F. R. SMITH 

e©., Barbers 

Try the t lectric Vibrassage Machine 
eOLORADO SPRINGS. GOLO. 



THE TIGBR 



TRY THE 

NEW eOLLINS HOTEL 

Cripple Greek. Colo. 

Home Dairy Restaurannt in connection 
Popular Prices 



Get your KODAK SUP- 



STUDENTS 

PLIES at GOERKE'S 

Only exclusive Photo Supply store in the city 
Opp. Opera House 21 N. Tejon 

We sell a GOOD FOUNTAIN PEN for $1 

WHITNEY & GRIMWOOD 

Opera House Building 

We are agents for WATERMAN'S IDEAL Fountain 
Pens. Prices from $2.50 up. 



J^red S. jffai/ner 

Watchmaker and Jeweler 

15 South Uejon St. 

*Dr. 2l/. bowler, 

DENTIST 

IS South Uejon St, 



G. W. Pauly, B. S., D. O. Mrs. Lona E. Pauly, B. S. D. O. 

Graduates of A. T. Still's College of Osteopathy, 

Kirksville, Mo. 

DR. & MRS. PAULY, ?I7s?^iYn"I'° 

Office, rooms 303-304 DeGraff Bldg. 118 N. Tejon St., Colo- 
rado Springs, Colo. Plrnnes— Office Ked 1272; Res. Ked323 
Hours 8 to 12 a . m . , 1 to 5 p . m. 



C. W. WAR50P & CO.. 



205 N. Tejon St. 



Draperies, Upholstery Goods, Furniture. Complete line of Screens, 
Pillows, Pillow Tops, Couch Covers, etc. 



Iiardwarc Bicycles 

fl. S. BLSKE 

New Chainless Bicycle $35 and $20 
Rambler, Orient and National Automobiles 

Best Repair Shop in citv 107 n* €eioti 



lUrs* B* R* Crooks 

Coilct Parlors at 20 €ast Kiowa 

Also Room 52, Antlers Hotel 

No Apprentices. Only experienced help employed. 

FRANK F. CRUMP 

FLORIST 

Phone 500 509 E. Columbia St. 

Special attention given to Telephone Orders. 

PARK BAKERY "^^ 

Finest Coffee and Lunch Room in the City 
J. SCHAErER, Prop., Colorado Springs, Colo. 



D. E. MONROE & CO. 
Prescription Druggist 

The best of Drugs, Stationery and Toilet Articles 

NO LIQUORS SOLD. 
eor. Teioti Sf Bifou Phone 311 9f 331 

For $1.00 Per Month 

/ Suit Sponged and Pressed each %>eek 
PANTATORIIM i7 east bijou 

Branch office opp. Plaza Hotel. 

Moles and Superflous Hair removed with Electricity 
Hair Goods made to Order 

lUrs^ Htina Betbniaii» 

HAIR DRESSING PARLORS 

27 E. Kiowa Phone Red 394 Ladies Bath 

Colorado Springs, Colo. 

When in doubt , take the safe side. 

SEND BUNDLES TO THE 

Colorado Springs Laundry 



Est. 20 yrs. 



Ralph Rice. College Agt. 



1 1 a^ LI I li| ^ Dl U^. 22 North Tejon Street 



Will build you a Home. Easy 
monthly Payments Phone 702-A 



t;he TIOCR 



COLORADO COLLEGE, SEPTEMBER 15, 1904. 



Vol. VIL 



No. I 



CONSTITUTION OF ''THE TIGER" OF 
COLORADO COLLEGE 



ARTlCLli I. — NAME. 

This paper shall be known as The Tiger. 

ARTICEE II. — object. 

Section i. The object of this paper shall be to 
promote the interests of Colorado College. 

Sec. 2. The further object of this paper shall 
be to stimulate the literary efforts of individuals. 

ARTICEE III. — THE TIGER BOARD. 

Section . The Tiger Board shall work as a 
whole, that is in all matters of administration the 
majority vote of the board shall prevail. 

Sec. 2. This board shall consist of one Editor- 
in-Chief, one Assistant Editor-in-Chief, one Ath- 
letic Editor, one Literary Editor, one Alumni 
Editor, one Local Editor, one Business Manager 
and one Assistant Business Manager. 

Sec. 3. The Literary Department shall consist 
of three Seniors, one a young woman ; two 
Juniors, one a young woman, and one Sophomore. 
The Business department shall consist of one 
Senior and one Junior. 

Sec. 4- The Editor-in-Chief and Athletic Edi- 
tor shall be Seniors, and the Literary Editor 
shall be a Senior young woman. The Assistant 
Editor-in-Chief shall be a Junior, and the Alumni 
Editor shall be a Junior young woman. The 
Local Editor shall be a Sophomore. 

Sec. 5. lime of Election. — The members of 
the board shall be elected at least four weeks be- 
fore the last number of the current year is pub- 
lished. 

Sec. 6. Manner of Election. — In the election of 
the board, the merit system shall be adopted, 
which as adapted to the needs of C. C. is as 
follows : 

Each member of the Literary Department must 
have competed for his position at least one year, 
during which period his work shall be judged 
according to its quality and quantity in the fol- 
lowing manner, namely, by such faculty members 
as shall be appointed by the faculty from the 
English Department. 

The election of the Literary Department of the 
board shall be made by a committee consisting of 
the three Senior literary members of the board at 
the time of said election. They shall accept in 



full such judgment as said faculty member shall 
make upon work of the competitors, and shall 
elect, taking the following things into considera- 
tion : 

First — Judgment of said faculty member on 
A\ork of competitors. 

Second — Executive ability and eminent fitness 
of the candidates. 

The business manager shall appoint his assist- 
ant each year with the approval of the board. It 
is understood that the assistant shall be a Junior 
and shall succeed to the managership on entering 
his Senior year, provided his work shall have 
been satisfactory. 

The board shall have full power to fill all va- 
cancies under the rules of the merit system. 

ARTICEE I. — DUTIES OF OEEICERS. 

Section i. It shall be the duty of the Editor- 
in-Chief— 

(i) To exercise general supervision of the 
workings of the Literary Department; 

(2) To preside at all meetings ; 

' Z) To write editorials; 

(4) To place on file each week all work sub- 
mitted by competitors ; 

(5) To look over and approve material sub- 
mitted for publication ; 

(6) To see that a requisite amount of matter 
goes to press each week and "read proof." 

Sec. 2. It shall be the duty of the Assistant 
Editor-in-Chief to be of general assistance to the 
Editor-in-Chief in such matters as reading proof 
and looking over material on file, and preparing 
exchanges, and to perform any other duties that 
the Editor-in-Chief may assign. 

Sec. 3. It shall be the duty of the Athletic Edi- 
tor to put in form all Athletic material submita d 
by competitors and to submit all other material 
necessary for the furtherance of Athletics. 

Sec. 4. It shall be the duty of the Literary Edi- 
tor to obtain as many literary productions as pos- 
sible ; to give the paper a distinctly literary tone 
and to perform any other duties that the Editor- 
in-Chief may assign. 

Sec. 5. The duty of the Alumni Editor shall 
be to keep in touch with all Alumni Associations 
and to prepare all Alumni material for publica- 
tior. 



THE TIGER 



Sec. 6. It shall be the duty of the local editor 
to look over and attend to all local correspond- 
ence, under the supervision of the Editor-in-Chief. 

Sec. 7. It shall be the duty of the business man- 
ager to attend to the business interests of the pa- 
per and make a full report once a month to the 
board of the financial condition of the paper in 
order that the board may know the exact finan- 
cial condition and act accordingly. 

Sec. 8. It shall be the duty of the Assistant 
Business Manager to make himself generally use- 
ful to the Manager. 

ARTICIvF, V. — i'UNDS. 

The net proceeds, if any, accruing from this 
paper, shall be divided in the following manner: 
The Business Manager shall receive 60 per cent, 
the Assistant Business Manager 15 per cent, and 
the Editor-in-Chief 25 per cent. 

The profit-sharers shall be responsible for all 
legitimate debts incurred by the paper. 

ARTICLE VI. 

This Constitution shall be ratified by the stu- 
dent body, and they alone shall have the power 
to amend it by a majority vote. 



STAG RECEPTION. 

The reception to all the young men of the Col- 
lege, given by the Y. M. C. A., went off without 
a hitch. The hearty spirit manifested there among 
all the men and the healthy rivalry between the 
two lower classes point to a good year not only 
for the College but for the Association as well. 
After a little warming up game of "shinny," dur- 
ing which the friends were gathering, the pro- 
gram of the evening was given. President Hed- 
bloom of the Association welcomed the men and 
said a few words about the work of the year. 
Professor Schneider and Prof. Parsons then gave 
some words of advice, and then Shaw and Nash 
held forth on "The Man Behind." President 
Slocum next addressed the men and spoke par- 
ticularly of the life of the men in the College 
and what he wished it to be. "Pi" Rice gave 
some of his always-to-be-remembered readings, 
and then refreshments were served. Sophs and 
Freshies now took, and apple bobbing, tugs-of- 
war, fencing and boxing matches followed in 
quick succession, the Sophs taking off most of 
the honors except the boxing match, while the 
Freshies made off with the tug-of-war rope -in 
the hope of winning this event but were ruled out. 
This ended the evening's amusement, and the 
boys went home, voting it a most pleasant time, 
and filled with a better idea of what College life 
can hold. 

ADVICE TO FRESHMEN. 

Never ask questions. People will then as- 
sume that you know all there is to be known 



and consequently lose all joy of conversation with 
you. 

Always push boldly ahead of upper classmen, 
particularly the young women. You may then 
possibly be taken for an upper classman your- 
self. 

Bow to everyone whose looks you like. No 
cne knows whether he has met you or not, and 
will be flattered to think you remember him. 

When meeting a Senior, prostrate yourself 
upon the ground until he passes, bumping the 
head repeatedly in the gravel. This will be an 
outward sign of the humility and respectful awe 
of which your soul is full. 

Never raise your hats to the young women. 
Few of the upper classmen do, and you would 
therefore be immediately identified as a Fresh- 
man. 

Always speak as low as possible in recitations. 
A loud tone is not considered refined, and it in- 
creases the professor's interest if he is obliged to 
give you close attention. 

Always take a bag of peanuts or popcorn to 
class with you and share it with your neighbors. 
This will insure popularity. 

Whisper freely during Chapel. Prexy likes 
tc have the new students feel at home. 

Freshness consists not in ignorance but in 
wisdom. 

There once was a Freshman at Colo., 
Who tried all instructions to folio., 
He took all advice. 
Disagreeable or nice, 
Nor failed any story to swallo. 



Y. M. C. A. 



The first meeting was held last Sunday. Pres- 
ident Slocum spoke, taking for his subject the 
line from Joshua I, "Be strong and of good cour- 
age." His speech was excellent, but the attend- 
ance was poor. Owing possibly to a misunder- 
standing there were very few upper classmen 
there. A better attendance is hoped for next 
time. 

Next Sunday the meeting will be held in the 
Apollonian clubhouse at 4 p. m. Rev. E. W. 
Work will speak. 

The Y. M. C. A. stands for the higher ideals 
ir. College and invites all those who sympa- 
thize with its motives to join. There seems to 
be here a misconception of its purpose. This 
organization does not stand for the propagation 
of "holiness" doctrines. To join you need not 
become a foreign missionary. It is not even 
necessary for you to be a church member, and 
this organization is not distinctively evangelistic. 
But it does stand for honesty, Christianity and 
purity. The meetings we hope to make practical 
and attractive, and as "such we ask you to join. 



THE TIGBR. 



LETTERS FROM A SENIOR TO A FRESH- 
MAN. 

D£;ar Fre;sh : 

Though I find it hard to go back in memory 
tc the dim and distant past of my Freshman year, 
I shall try to do so in order to point out -the 
pitfalls into which your infant feet may stray. 

Now that my hair is gray from study and 1 
have forgotten how to smile, I find it a little 
strange to think that once I was as bright and 
joyous and care free as you are, dear Fresh. 
"Alas, the dear, dead days that are no more." 

When some one tells you that "the Seniors 
are the wildest crowd in College," look on me 
and ponder before you accept it as gospel truth. 

But all this is aside from my purpose. You 
probably think because of your arrival the Col- 
lege will at once begin to increase in wisdom 
and stature and in favor with God and man. 

This is a common fallacy — common with 
Freshmen, I mean. But cheer up. A high 
opinion of one's self is sometimes an excellent 
thing, for then you know that at least one person 
thinks well of you. But pray do not allow this 
opinion of yourself to get out "amongst 'em," for 
if will inevitably receive some hard knocks. 

If you are an exceedingly fresh Freshman, 
dear Fresh, you will doubtless need to take a 
few doses of our excellent remedy for such a 
disease. It is called Dr. S. I. T. On's Sure Cure 
for Freshness. It is unpleasant to take, but last- 
ing in its effects if the doses are large enough. 

Remember, dear Fresh, that the Seniors are 
persons whom you must hold in profound awe. 
Perhaps you may not consider them particularly 
awe inspiring, but "appearances are deceitful." 
Nothing is such a mark of greenness as the 
bck of proper respect for a Senior. 

If you are wise for your years, you may ask 
everyone you meet if he is a Senior. Yet even 
this plan has its drawbacks. There are some 
Frofs, young in looks and not stricken in years. 
The safest plan is to begin the conversation by 
saying, "And of what are you professor?" Then, 
if he disclaims this honor, descend slowly through 
the classes till you find his proper place. 

I trust, dear Fresh, that you may profit by these 
few words of advice. It is given free of charge, 
and there is more where it came from. Only 
one thing more, remember that freshness is re- 
freshing for a short time and in small quantities, 
but the limit is soon reached. Yours, '05. 



7:30 P.M. — Apollonian, Club House (Closed 

meeting). 
7 130 P. M. — Pearsons, Cutler, up stairs. 
7 :30 P. M. — Miltonian, Room 12, Perkins. 
7 :oo P. M.— Y. W. C. A., at Ticknor Study. 

SATURDAY^ SEPT. 1 7. 

2 130 P. M. — Tigers vs. High School on Wash- 
burn Field. 

SUNDAY, SEPT. 18. 

4:ooP. M.— Y. M. and Y. W. C. A. Addressed 
by Dr. E. W. Work. Ticknor 
Study. 



CALENDAR. 



FRIDAY, SEPT. 16. 

4 :oo P. M.— Minerva, at Apollonian Club House. 
4 :30 P. M. — Hypatia, Room 12, Perkins. 



I'd like to be a Senior, 

And with the Seniors stand; 
A fountain pen behind my ear; 

A note book in my hand. 
I would not write in it at all. 

But keep it clean all day. 
For I would be a Senior, 

And with the Seniors stay. 

I would not be President ; 

'Tis hard to be a king, 
I would not be an emperor, 

Though all the world 'twould bring. 
I would not be an angel, 

For angels have to sing; 
But I would be a Senior, 

And never do a thing. 

Whoever complains of our gym. 
As lacking essentials for him 
Should heed well this word — 
His complaint won't be heard, 
His patience is clearly to slim. 

— The Tech. 

"What do the newspapers mean when they 
talk about the seat of war and the standing army?" 

"Why, don't you know ? The seat of war is for 
the standing army to sit on when it gets tired." 
— The Kaimin. 

Street Car Conductor — How old are you, little 
girl? 

Young Bostonian — If the corporation does not 
object, I'll pay full fare, and keep my own sta- 
tistics. 



To get-rich-quick, with reckless haste. 

We risk our little store; 
To get-wise-quick, we cram the young 

With fifty kinds of lore. 

The college student, in rendering an account of 
his expenses, inserted, "For charity, thirty- five 
dollars." His sire wrote back, "I fear charity 
covers a multitude of sins." 



THE TIGER 



THE TIGER 

Published weekly during the College year by 
The Tiger Pu1)lishing Co., in the interest of Colo- 
rado College. 

J. Y. Crothers Editor-in-Chief 

T. Hunter Assistant Editor-in-Chief 

J. I. Muffley Athletic Editor 

Miriam Carpenter Literary Editor 

Mabel Barbee Alumni Editor 

A. H. Fisher Local Editor 

Bert Wasley Business Manager 

C. A. Hedblom .... Assistant Business Manager 

CORRESPONDENTS : 

Mr. Nash, Mr. Nead, Miss McDowell, Miss Isham, 
Mr. Willis, Miss Kidder, Mr. Anderson. 

Subscription, $1.25 per year, payable in advance. 
Single copy, 5 cents. 

The Tiger is forwarded to all subscribers until 
ordered discontinued and all arrearanges are paid. 



Students, Professors and Alumni are invited 
to contribute literary articles, personals and items. 
Contributions must be accompanied by the writer's 
name. 

Address all communications to The Tiger, 
Colorado College, Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Entered at the Postoffice at Colorado Springs, 
Colo., as second-class matter. 



Patronize Tiger Advertisers 



EDITORIAL 

DO IT NOW. 

A HEARTY welcome has been extended to all 
new students by the different organizations 
of the College, and The Tiger's welcome is not 
a whit less hearty than the others. We have 
noticed a tendency on the part of Faculty and 
Seniors to give unlimited quantities of advice, 
l)ut the advice has been so good that it will bear 
itpeating. In the first place, identify yourself 
with one of the Christian organizations of the 
College. Whatever may be your views on Chris- 
tianity, remember that Colorado College was 
founded with a distinctively Christian ideal, and 
k is owing to this ideal that you enjoy your 
present advantages. As an educated and refined 
gentleman or lady you must know something of 
the greatest influence in the world. Next, be 
sure to join some literary society. Your College 
course will not amount to much if you do not 
learn to express to others what you have ac- 
quired. Every College graduate should be able to 
think on his feet before an audience, and nothing 
will teach him this so well as the constant prac- 



tice received in the literary society. Do not neg- 
lect the physical man. Your intellectual attain- 
ments will avail little if not backed up by energy. 
In this beautiful climate there is no excuse for 
a person's not spending several hours each day 
out of doors. If you cannot play football, bas- 
ketball, baseball or tennis, you can at least walk 
or run, and get your lungs full of Colorado air. 
Last, but not least, contribue to The Tiger^ pat- 
ronize Tiger advertisers, subscribe for The Tiger. 
Do it now. 



THE CONSTITUTION. 

A N another page is printed the Constitution of 
The Tiger, in order that new students may 
understand on what basis the paper is published. 
Before last year each board elected its successors, 
but was not responsible to any one for its choice. 
Consequently favoritism was sometimes charged 
against the iretiring board. This has been 

changed, however, and now if you do not get 
on The Tiger Board it is your own fault, or 
perhaps your misfortune in not being so able and 
persistent as another. The election is now purely 
on a competitive basis. All the contributions of 
the year are preserved, and presented to a Fac- 
ulty member of the English Department, who 
makes his recommendations. With this in mind, 
the Senior members of the board elect the lit- 
erary members of the next year. Each contri- 
bution must be accompanied by the author's name, 
though this will not be published if he so re- 
quests. Drop all articles in The Tiger box at 
the right of the Librarian's desk. 



THE OUTLOOK. 

j N some respects the outlook for athletics is 
very bright — in no respect is it discouraging 
if the students will pull together. So far as ma- 
terial, both old and new, is concerned, we should 
have a championship team in football. Our 
coach, Juneau, has been successful in boosting 
other teams to victory, and can be relied on to 
do his share of the work. The financial state- 
ment, in another part of The Tiger, is riot alto- 
gether rosy, but it can be made immensely more 
encouraging if the students get together and boost 
as they should. All students should be at ev- 
ery home game, and many at the games away 
from home. Be willing to sacrifice a little for the 
College. One student has offered to donate a 
week's work toward getting the field in shape if 
others will do the same. That kind of spirit will 
give us the championship as decisively as we 
won it in '99 and '00. Get into the games — ev- 
erybody, and let us be champions in everything 
ir 'o4-'o5. You can do it if you revive the real 
Tiger spirit. 



THE TIGBR 



P EGINNING with next week the Academy De- 
partment will run full blast. All Academy 
students are urged to help their editor make a 
success of his portion of The Tiger. 



OUR ADVERTISERS. 



VOUR attention is called especially to the ad- 
vertisements found in The TigEk. The man- 
agers have been careful in their selection of ad- 
vertisers, and feel confident that they are deserv- 
ing of your patronage. Getting advertisements 
has been very discouraging work for over a year 
in the Springs, and especially for The TigeR 
managers. Some men give their ads as a char- 
ity proposition, but most business men look for 
substantial returns. The Tiger could not be run 
without its ads, and these can not be secured 
without the co-operation of the students. Buy of 
Tiger advertisers, and don't be afraid to tell 
them you saw their ad in The TigeR. It is in- 
teresting to watch the broad smile of satisfaction 



on the face of a man when you tell him your pat- 
ronage comes as a result of his ad. 



FAREWELL. 



CENIORS and Juniors especially were sorry 
to learn that Dr. Lancaster has severed his 
connection with Colorado College. Fed and 
Psych will hardly seem like the same studies 
without Lanky to teach them. The boxing bout 
at the stag reception is always more interesting 
when the Doctor's head is being punched. Then, 
what will the Faculty do for a first-baseman 
next year when they come up against the Seniors ? 
But the place where Dr. Lancaster is missed most 
is as chairman of the Students' Self-Help Com- 
mittee. He had given of his time most gener- 
ously to this work, and was very successful in 
it, as the people of the city had great confidence 
in him. 

It is now President Lancaster, President of 
Olivet College, Michigan, a college with as many 
students as Colorado College. We wish the 
Doctor the greatest success in his new work. 




ATHLETIC 
DEPARTMENT 



STATEMENT 

of the Colorado College Athletic Association for 
the year 1903-04, dated Colorado Springs, August 

5. 1904- 

Condition oe the Association. 

eiabieities. 
Outstanding notes — 

Field debt $300.00 

Current debt 400.00 $700.00 

Outstanding bills for supplies — 

Strang 281 .30 

Burns .(baseball suits) 35-00 

Newton Lumber Co 6.75 323.05 

Other debts — 
Baseball — 

Windsor Hotel 13-75 

Medical- 
Doctors' bills 91.00 

Medicines 34-45 125.45 

Contingent expense — 

Students' work i7-05 



Transfer Co 4.25 

Window card,s 3.50 

Printing 7.75 

Cash book 1.25 33.80 



Total indebtedness $1,196.05 

RESOURCES. 

Cash on hand $7-57 

Supplies on hand (estimate)... 125.00 

Total resources 132.57 



Present net indebtedness 1.063.48 

Indebtedness, Sept. i, 1904 1,427.54 



Net gain for the year $364.06 

GAINS. 

Football ^ $652.45 . 

Donations — 

On field debt $625.00 

Rummage sale, Apr., 

1903 3T9-90 



8 



THE TIGBR. 



Incorporation charges — ■ 
C. W. Haines . . . 50.00 
N. W. Campbell . 25.00 

Other items 37.11 1,057.01 

Rummage sale, Apr., 1904 . . 369.80 

Minstrels 108.38 

Fees 720.80 $2,908.43 

LOSSES. 

Supplies— Paid $395-35 

Owed 32305 

718.40 
On hand 125.00 593.40 

Manager, fall, 1903 25.00 

Coach 800.00 

Baseball — Paid 194-25 

Owed 13-75 208.00 

Track 99.86 

Medical — Paid ...... 34.50 

Owed 91.00 

Owed (drugs 34.45 159-95 

Basketball 5.25 

Interest 58.27 

Contingent expense 

Paid 268.58 

Owed 33-8o 

302.38 

Less 30.30* 272.08 

Training table 232.70 

Students' work 89.86 2,544.37 

Gain for the year 364.06 

*$30 from High School — rent of field. 

The statement shows that with the large amount 
of money that has been either given or earned, 
r.nd in spite of a very heavy expense, the con- 
dition of the Association is better than it was a 
year abo by $364.06. But since no further dona- 
tions on the Field account can be expected, and 
since it is hardly likely that the statement of 
gains for this coming year will include the pro- 
ceeds from two rummage sales and a minstrel 
show, it is of the greatest importance that ex- 
penses be cut wherever it is possible to do that. 
Atherton No yes. Treasurer. 



THE SQUAD. 



With the arrival of Coach Juneau all the old 
football stars and many new aspirants for grid- 
iron honors reported for practice. The squad is 
large and looks good. Many new fellows are in 
the squad, and competition for places on the 
'varsity promises to be sharp. 

Captain Lennox has been busy for several 
weeks working up enthusiasm and inducing new 
men to try for the team. The captain is in fine 
trim and will no doubt play a star game at end. 



Bale, who for three years has played center, will 
again try for the place. Mosteller of the Kan- 
sas University squad will also try for the position 
at center. Billy Johnston and Shorty Randolph 
will again likely do the work at quarter; and 
Hill, Morgan, Scibird and Mack are trying for 
halves. Faucett is being tried at full. He is a 
big fellow from Park College, and bids fair to 
make a place. Hedblom, the two Vandemoers, 
Gibbs, Howbert, Nead and Seybold are possi- 
bilities for the line positions. Fisher is trying 
for left end and will make some of them hustle, 
for he is bigger and faster than he was last year. 
Anderson, Fisk, Kaull, Tucker and Rice are also 
and may be in the lineup ere the season is very 
old. 

Two good men did not return. They are D. G. 
Rice and Earl Xamb, the two stars of last year's 
team at guard and end respectively. Their loss 
will be keenly felt, and we very much regret 
that they cannot wear the moleskins for Old C. C. 

But the squad looks good. We think de have 
a good coach. And now, students, let us support 
the team at every opportunity, and there can be 
but one result. Colorado College will make a 
great fight for that flag. 



THE COACH. 



Football practice in real earnest was begun on 
Monday evening under the instruction of Coach 
Juneau. The new coach certainly looks good, 
and he bids fair to fulfill the high hopes that are 
enthroned in the breasts of all loyal students. Mr. 
Juneau played four years on the varsity of the 
University of Wisconsin, and wherever Wis- 
consin football is known, the captain of the team 
of '02 is known and respected. Juneau played 
end on the champion team of '01, and was cap- 
tain in 1903. For three years he played an end po- 
sition, and in his last year at Wisconsin he played 
at halfback. He has accomplished the difficult 
feat of making a successful drop kick from the 
45-yard line. Last year Mr. Juneau coached the 
high school team that won the state champion- 
ship in Wisconsin. 

It is interesting to know that Mr. Juneau played 
in the games against Merrill between Beloit and 
Wisconsin, and always furnished his share of 
Beloit's defeat. Besides coming with this bril- 
liant record, Mr. Juneau is highly recommended 
as a gentleman and a coach. Let us all "stand 
pat" for the team and the coach, and put Colo- 
rado where she belongs. 



THE ATHLETIC FEE. 

By studying carefully the financial statement 
of the Athletic Association the student may ap- 
preciate the fact that something must be done, 



THE TIGBR. 



and that soon. It has been suggested by several 
of the students who are particularly interested in 
seeing Colorado College stand at the top, that the 
athletic fee for boys be raised to $5.00 a year, from 
its present amount of $3.00. The students them- 
selves voted to tax themselves to the amount of 
our present athletic fee, which is certainly small 
enough. If it is to be raised, the fellows are the 
ones to do it. Our fee would still be smaller 
than that of almost any institution which pre- 
tends to be doing anything at all in athletics. 

It is wonderful how much the Association has 
accomplished while handicapped by such a burden 
of debt. We cannot expect to do our best until 
we get out of debt, and can furnish our team 
with the very best of equipment. Nothing but 
the best will satisfy the supporters of Colorado 
College in the state this year, and it is up to the 
fellows to see that they are not disappointed. 

Do not pass this matter hastily, but thing it 
over, and talk it over, especially. The: Tiger 
would be glad to have some expressions of opin- 
ion on this matter next week. If we are to in- 
crease the fee it should be done soon, and the 
cash be paid in immediately. 



out suggestion? If so, then it must be conceded 
that there is no love of sport for sport's own sake. 
On the contrary, if it is wrong, then why do 
coaches and teachers suggest or permit it? 

A victory thus won is transitory; the effects 
of such an act last a lifetime. — Boston Herald. 



HONOR IN FOOTBALL AMONG THE 
FIRST ESSENTIALS. 



TIGER NOTES. 

Among the new members of the Sophomore 
Class are Miss Scott from C. A. C, Mr. Kaull 
from D. U., and Mr. Paulson from Boulder. 

Miss Bateman is ill with typhoid fever, but ex- 
pects to return to school after a time. 

"Public Speaking A" has been made an elective, 
with one hour's credit. 

Miss Kemp, Miss McMillan, Miss Humphreys 
and Miss Beach, former students of C. C, are 
back this year. 

Professor and Mrs. Schneider chaperoned a 
jolly crowd to Red Rock Canon Saturday. 

Miss Irene Whitehurst is seriously ill with 
typhoid fever. 



The approach of the football season gives rise 
to some thoughts concerning this great game that 
flourishes to a wonderful extent in the educa- 
tional institutions of the country. It is a note- 
worthy fact that this English conception has taken 
hold of schools as no other game has done, and 
its development, its play, and incidental features 
have all been the subejct of thought by young 
men receiving impressions and those employed 
to teach them. 

This being the case, the most important point 
for present comment is the ethical incidents to 
the game. Remembering that the game is largely 
one attracting the educated youth of the country, 
and that these young men are at the period of 
life .when teaching, be it from the book or any 
other medium, makes a deep and lasting impres- 
sion, does it not appear paramount that honor 
in the play be one of the first necessary lessons? 

How often, however, is it apparent that teach- 
ers, coaches, and fellow students fail to practice 
this realization? For example, it is earnestly 
desired to win a game against a certain team; 
there is a particularly strong player on that 
eleven; with him out of the game "our" team can 
win. The coach suggests these facts and the 
players do the rest — they play to disable the star, 
weakening the strongest link in the opponents* 
chain. 

Is it argued that this is justifiable? That the 
team — or any team — would naturally do this with- 



Bush is to be at Ann Arbor this year. 

Miss Ragan and Miss Kidder entertained a 
number of Freshman girls at a spread Friday 
night. 

Miss Sara Wallace is to spend the winter vis- 
iting in Milwaukee. 

Earl Lamb is at Stanford this year. 

Miss Helen Banfield goes to Vassar this year 
rmd Miss Leah Crane to Oberlin. 

Miss Jessie Smith and Miss Jessie Sammons 
entertained a few of their friends at a birthday 
spread Saturday night. 

The Y. W. C. A. reception Thursday after- 
noon was a very pleasant affair and afforded the 
new girls a chance to become acquainted. 

The "Sat-On-Family" have admitted a new 
member. To belong to this "Family" is an honor 
to which many aspire but few attain. 

We've started again. 

Pres. S., in his ethical : "I am glad to see you 
all back again." 



IC 



THE riGBR 



Don't forget that the football team need your 
support, "be it ever so humble." 



The fraternities will get you if you don't watch 
out. 



Silently they wander back, one by one. 



Vandemoer won the cane contest. 



Any young man who wishes to put in his bid 
as manager of the Glee and Mandolin Clubs may 
see J. H. Nash, President, or Ray B. Shaw, Sec 
retary pro tern, concerning duties and responsi- 
bilities. 

Don't fail to attend the opening meeting of 
the Pearsons Literary Society on Friday night, 
September 16. All young men invited. 

The Minerva society has issued invitations for 
its opening dance on Saturday evening, September 
17th. 

There seems to be a scarcity of new members 
in the upper classes. 

Where, oh, where are the Senior boys ! 

Miss Smith and Miss Sammons entertained 
their friends at a birthday spread Saturday even- 
ing. 

The tennis courts seem to be unusually pop- 
ular this fall. 

Poor English Literature ! 

Prof. Ruger is giving his class in Pedagogy a 
course in kindergarten work. 



Prof. Urdahl wi 
day. 



return to his classes Wednes- 



As usual the Freshman class has several mem- 
bers who yet have to endure the ordeal of "be- 
ing squelched." 

Miss Douthit and Miss Weaver of the Soph 
class are attending Boulder this year . 

If you were particularly attentive, you might 
have noticed some "rushing" going on. 

Two of our best athletes, D. G. Rice and Earle 
Lamb, are on the absent list. 

Painter is missing, but will return later. 

Men are wanted on the football squad. Don't 
be bashful ! 

Coach Juneau has "arrove," by Jove ! 



We welcome Professors Birchby and Crab- 
tree among our new profs. May they bear much 
fruit ! 

If you have a thought, put it in the TiGER box. 
It it is a happy one you'll see it in print. 

We have no Chapel on Saturday now. Those 
who W'ant to may go once more on Sunday in- 
stead. 

How about that last verse, Shaw? 

Earl Cooley, '00, was seen on the campus this 
week. 

Caj — All those whom I know need not stay at 
the board. 

McCreery takes his seat. 

Caj (staring at him) — Who are you? 

If you haven't been to the mountains' this 
^^eek, at least be sure to go next. 

The new students get their Dutch five days 
ahead of time. 

Freshman (to President Slocum) — Is this Mr. 
Prexie? 

The students enjoyed a "conversation" with 
J B. Mahaffy of Dublin University last Tuesday 
morning. It was a rare treat to have such dis- 
tinguished scholars with us. 

The poor Chapel monitor for the Freshmen 
must learn 103 new faces (minus those who 
flunked last year). 



Y. W. C. A. 



The first meeting of the Y. W. C. A. was well 
attended, and much interest was shown con- 
cerning the work of the coming year. 

Miss Haynes took for her topic, "The Best 
Things in College Life," and read the beautiful 
parable of the vine from the fifteenth chapter of 
John, which contains the words of Christ to his 
disciples, "That ye love one another as I have 
loved you." 

She brought out in her talk the fact that we 
should have a definite purpose in our College life, 
and that although we are placed in a certain en- 



THE TIGER 



IT 



vironment still we have the power largely to 
govern our own environment by the friendships 
we make, and by no means to leave God, our 
greatest Friend, out of our lives. 

She cited as a fitting example for our daily 
lives the qoutation from Phillips Brooks, in which 
he speaks of life as a perfect cube, the length rep- 
rtsented by personal ambition, breadth by giving 
to others, and height the uplifting to God. 



ALUMNI NOTES. 

CIvASS OF 1904. 

Eulalie Reinhardt has secured a position as 
instructress of Spanish in the Cripple Creek 
High School. 

Daketa Allen is teaching in Walsenburg, Colo- 
rado. 

T. C. Hunt is principal of the Pike View 
School. 

Katriena Hay den is one of the teachers in the 
Helen Hunt School. 

Wm. M. Vories is in Colorado Springs, contin- 
uing his Y. M. C. A. work. 

The school at Gillette, Colo., claims Albert 
Hardy as its principal. 

Edith Hall has a position in the Saguache 
County High School. 

Francis Loud is Professor of Science in the 
Fort Morgan High School. 

Ethel Harrington is assistant principal and in- 
structress of Physics in the Central City High 
School. - 

Homer Reed and George Gardner will study 
law at D. U. 

Jessie Gordon will teach at Eaton, Colo. 

Peter Keplinger has the eighth grade in the 
Monte Vista School. 

Barnes is working for the Electric Light Com- 
pany in the Springs. 

L. R. Stillman will teach near Monte Vista 
the coming year. 



EXCHANGES. 



"It is true that you began life without any cap- 
1 ?" asked the reporter who was interviewing 



tlic m 



ulti 



lionaire. "No, indeed," replied the 



A Kansas farmer is authority for the statement 
that a full-grown and able-bodied cyclone will lift 
everything on the place except the mortgage. 



^elf-made man, "I began with a capital L" 

The sea hath pearls. 

And yet — 'tis no joke — 

You see all the waves 
On the beach going broke. 

Concerning college football teams 

It often comes to pass. 
The man who's half-back on the field 

Is full back in his class. 



Guide — This is the machine shop.. 
Visitor — Oh, yes ; where machinists are made. 
Guide — This is the engine room. 
Visitor — Oh, yes ; where engineers are made. 
Guide — This is the forge room. 
Visitor — Certainly; where forgers are made. — 
Rocky Mountain Collegian. 

You can never make a woman believe that the 
grocer who stops to admire the baby is giving her 
short weight. 

They've made a wireless telegraph 

A horseless carriage, too. 
And there's no way of telling what 

The mind of man can do. 
We'll soon be eating henless eggs, 

And drinking cowless milk. 
And wearing clothes of sheepless wool, 

Or mayhap wormless silk. 

How would you like a treeless peach. 

Or a piece of hogless pork? 
I'd be content, if they'd invent, 

A kind of tireless work. 
Or, mayhap, noiseless noise. 

And I'm kfraid if they keep on 
They'll yet make dadless boys. 

Bachelor Maid— I do wish the Lord had made 
me a man. 

Unsympathetic Caller— Perhaps he has, but you 
haven't found him yet. 

Students, if in need of glasses or repairs on 
same, see Ashby, the Optical Jeweler, the oldest 
established in the county. You will find every- 
thing right. 

Uncle (trotting Harry on his knee)— Do you 
like this, my boy? 

Harry---Pretty well; but I rode a real donkey 
llie other day at the Zoo. 



THE TIGER. 



• The Hook — Do you catch on? 
The Coat— I'll be hanged if I do. 

Teacher — What is a furlough ? 

Small Boy — It's a mule. 

Teacher — Why do you thing so? 

Small Boy— I've got a book that's got a picture 
of a mule in it, and it says under it, "Going home 
one his furlough." 

"Paw," said little WilUe, "is there such a thing 
as a cradle of the deep?" 

"Certainly, son," replied Paw, "there's got to 
be something to stop the squalls at sea." 

Tom — Say, Fred, lend me your shaving mug 
to shave? 
Fred — Oh, get away ! shave your own mug. 

Payne, examiner at Cambridge University, asked 
a student to give a definition of happiness. "An 
exemption from Payne," was the reply. 

"Shall I brain him?" cried the hazer, and the 
victim's courage fled. 

"You can't; it is a Freshman. Just hit him on 
the head." 

Three men entered a hotel and began exchang- 
ing confidences. Mr. A. said, "Yes, once I was 
taken for the Prince of Wales." 

"That was nothing," said Mr. B., "I was once 
taken for the Duke of Argon." 

"Ah !" said Mr. C, "Once I stepped into a store 
and a man stalked up and grasping my hand 
said, 'Holy Moses, are you here?'" — Hastings Col- 
legian. 

She — You make love like a novice. 

He — Then we are both defective. I ought to 
make love like an expert, and you ought not to 
know the difference. — Illustrated Bits. 

"But you promised," she protested, "that you 
wouldn't ask me to name the day until I felt per- 
fectly sure that I loved you. 

"I know," he replied, "and I'm sorry you're 
still in doubt. By the way, I sold short on Steel 
IcSt summer and have just cleaned up — " 

"How would a week from Thursday suit you?" 
she interrupted. — New York Herald. 

"I see that those New York society women 
have discovered a method of hiding their 
blushes." 

"What is it?" 
"They paint them over." — Cleveland Plain 
dealer. 

Professor (exasperated) — Why don't you speak 
louder? 



Pupil — A soft answer turneth away wrath. 

"Patrick, you haven't given fresh water to the 
goldfish." 

"No, miss ; they ain't drunk what they had." 

Vassar College is not yet a half century old, 
dating from 1861. Wellesley, Smith, and Rad- 
cliffe have existed only a quarter of a century. 
Bryn Mawr was begun in 1880. Yet together with 
Barnard in 1900 they had '3,378 students, and the 
students of all woman's colleges in that year 
numbered 15,000, just one-third of the 50,000 
students in the nation's men's colleges, some of 
which boast foundations more than two cen- 
turies old. — Oberlin Review. 

A man to whom illness was cronic. 
When told that he needed a tonic. 
Said, "O Doctor, dear, 
Won't you please make it beer?" 
"No, no," said the Doc ; "that's Teutonic." 
Princeton Tiger. 

"I wonder why they always speak of truth as 
being at the bottom of a well?" asked the inquisi- 
tive boarder. 

"Because a lot of pumping is usually neces- 
sary to bring it out, I suppose," answered the 
human encyclopedia of usless information. — Silver 
and Gold. 

Mr. Scrappy — Do you know I found my hat in 
the china closet? I suppose you put it in that 
ridiculous place. 

Mrs. Scrappy — Well, don't you say anything, 
John; you are always putting it on something 
ridiculous. — Brooklyn Life. 

TALE OF A FRESHMAN. 

Ivittle Willie was a Freshman, 
Green as grass and greener, too; 

Of all persons in creation 

None there were so green in hue. 

One day, while he was out walking 
Through a field he chanced to pass. 

And a brindle cow devoured him 
Thinking he was only grass. 

Little Willie is in Heaven, 

Vacant are two places now. 
In the class there is no Willie; 

In the field there is no cow. 



Thomas Millinery cordially invite you to their 
semi-annual opening of Imported Hats, Fur Sets 
I'nd Millinery Novelties, Wednesday afternoon and 
evening,' Sept. 14, 1904. 13 S. Tejon street. 



THE TIGER 








i:ssv..^iiil„o.:^« 



THE gRESeENT A LLEYS McINTIRE & JENNINfiS 1IM17 N. Cascade 

lr\ /^ j^ m You are next to a good hair cut or shave when you patronize 

^^/^*^* The Manhattan Barber Shop, J, R. WEYMAR, Prop. soTbijoU 



WHITAKER & GARDNER 

30 N. TEJON ST. 

Headqfiaftef s for 

gollege Shoes 

OF EVERY DESCRIPTION 

We have the best mining and civil engineering boot 
in the market 

WHITAKER & GARDNER 



ROOMS 

Finely furnished. At 730 N. Weber 

FOR RENT: Very reasonable. 
Large, lig-ht, comfortable mod- 
ern Rooms. 218 East Dale. 



#^I5 



AUND(?y 



THE STAR is the leader for prompt 
and satisfactory service. 

SPECIAL RATES to students of col- 
lege and academy 

S. E. BENNETT, College Ag't. 



w. I. Lcefls 



Columbia, Hartford , Rambler, Ideal & Tribune Bicycles 

The only first-class renair shop in town. Chainless wheels 
a specialty. Wheels for rent. Phone 517- A. I29N. Tejon 

Vli^ 6tlli$ Brothers 

THE LITTLE STORE WITH BIG BUSINESS 

Cigars, Tobacco and Periodicals === Cripple Creek 



Every St\i<lent 

Buy Shoes where the Style and 

PRICES ARE RIGHT 



r " 

J iifi 



S ENTITLED to a Special Discount on the best Shoes made at 
lis South Tejon Street R. A. HANDY SHOE CO. 



14 



THE TIGBR 



Colorado College 



THE OLDEST INSTITUTION FOR 
HIGHER EDUCATION IN THE WEST 

FOUNDED AT COLORADO 
SPRINGS IN J874 



Colorado College now offers advantages of the same 
grade as the best institutions. 

For information concerning Courses of Study, Rooms 
and Board, Physical Culture, etc., apply to 

WM. F. SLOCUM, President, 
or EDWARD S. PARSONS, Dean. 

For information in regard to the College Department of 
Music, inquire of 

EDWARD S. PARSONS, Dean. 

Those wishing information as to the Courses in Drawing, 
Painting, Designing, etc., etc., inquire of 

EDWARD S. PARSONS, Dean. 

For information concerning the Engineering Depart- 
ment, apply to 

FLORIAN CAJORI, 
Dean of Engineering School. 



Cutler Academy 

Cutler Academy is the Associated Prepartory School of 
Colorado College, in which students are prepared for any 
American College. Address, 

M. C. GILE, Principal. 



THB TIGBR 



15 



The Albert Sechrist Manufacturing Co. 

WILL INSTALL GAS and 



1033 16th 
Street 




ELECTRIC FIXTURES 

in your residence at Colorado Springes 
same price as Denver, without extra 
charge. Call and select your fixtures, 
or will send you a catalog-ue. 



DENVtR, 
COI.O. 




The Sutherland 
Engraving Go^ 

1814 Curtis Street 




Denver, Colorado 



Office Phone 309-B 



Residence Phone Red 871 



DR. HARRY L MOREHOUSE 

DEXTIST 

Hours 9-12, 1:30-5 First N t'l Bank BIdg., room 8 

The 50-mile-an-hour Wheel 

Reading Standard Bicycles 

SBEFF & RIfiGS Opposite Plaza Hotel 



The epx Shoe eo. 

107 S. Tejon St. Colorado Springs, Colo. 
J. M. eex 



LADIES, MISSES AND CHILD- 
REN'S SHOES 

MEN'S, YOUTHS' AND BOYS' 
SHOES 



S^erki'ns Crocker t/ Co. 

F. A. PERKINS, Manager 

/20 ^. Vejon Si. 


JOHN MOFFAT 

Tine Cailoring 

Repairing, Cleaning, Pressing. Special rates to 

College Students 
Over Waiting's Book Store 16 South Tejon St. 


1 


*h 


e Sonsolidat 
Publishing 
Company 


e 


d 


VBE WIING 

24 E. Kiowa St. Colorado Springs, Colo. 




Priivters aLi\d P\ibl sKers 






G. C. LAKE 


\ij : J :iL J.1 i_ 




119 


I 


we are equippeu wiin me newesi 

and best assortment of type and 

printing machinery in Colo. Springs 

iHST PIKE'S PERK HY 


EIM 


UE 


Cbe (College Shoemaker 

Enquire at Engine House on Campus 



NEW EMPIRE THEATRE 3 shows Daily ^^ l Matinee 3 P. M 

Evenings 7:30 and 8:45 



10C 



VAUDEVILLE 



10C 



i6 



THE TIGER 



El Paso Cleaning & Tailoring Co, Pressing Dyeing Alte ing 

10 E. Kiowa St. Phone Main 6674 Colo. Springs Cleaning Repairing Tailoring 



Prof. Chas, J. Hausdorf 

TEACHER OE MANDOLIN, GUITAR AND BANJO 

Music furnished for weddings, receptions, 

entertainments, etc. 

21 North Tejon. 



ESTABLISHED 1878 

AIKEN'S 
MU5EUM 

COLORADO SPRINGS COLO 



C. E. Arcularius & Co. 
Jewekrs 

Diamonds and Watches 

Fine Jewelry Manufacturing 

9 South Tejon St. Colorado Springs 

The 

Crissey & Eowler Lumber 
Company 

Phone 101 117 to 123 West Vermijo Ave. 

For Prompt attention and Satisfactory 
Work, patronize the 

Monarch Hand 
Laundry 

KARL L. IVIOHLER, Prop. 
W. J. WALLRICH, College Agt. 

A perfect fiUtng shirt necessitates hand %>ork 
Phone 540 329 E. Pikes Peak Ave. 

FINE CHOCOLATE BON BONS 



Name on every Piece 

Ice Cream, Hot and Cold 

Sodas 

Fresh Candies made exery hour 



INION ICE AND COAL COMPANY 

W. M. BANNING, Prop. 




Coal, mood atid Tec 

Dealers in all kinds of Coal and Artificial and 
Natural Ice 

YaidOffice, 105 W. Vermijo Ave. City Office, 5 N. Tejon 




H. E. BOATRIGHT 

Public Steno^^rapher 

33 GIDDINGS BLDG. 
Rates be per 100 words, 50c per hr. extra carbons 5c per page 



Carriages, Cabs, 

'Busses, Baggage and 

Transfer Wagons 

Office, 15 Xorth Cascade 



Denver Law School 

Law Department of the 
University of Denver 

Three years' course leading to the degree of 
Bachelor of Laws. Courses in Mining and Irri- 
gation Law. Full resident faculty. For informa- 
tion address 

LUCIUS W. HOYT, Dean 

Ernest & Cranmer BIdg., Denver, Colo. 

Burqess' 
Groceries 



That they are in every way the 
best^ you quickly learn by test 

112 North Tejon St. 

Titsworth & Davidson 
DAIRY 

2 MILES S. E. or COLORADO SPRINGS. P. 0. BOX 6 

The HoucbPavidson Coal and Transfer Co. 

Dealers In 

CANON CITY, MAITLAND 

AND LIGNITE COAL 

Phone 473-B. Office US N. Tejon. P. O. Box 275 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 






15h e Gowdy-Simmons Printing Company 

FOR WINDOW CARDS, TICKETS, ETC. ENGRAVED 
CARDS AND INVITATIONS ON SHORT NOTICE 



X See 

* ALBANY. N. Y. 

* Makers of CAPS and GOWNS to American Col- 

* leges and Universities from the Atlantic to 

- the Pacific. Bulletin, samples, etc. 

- upon application. 



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21 9^oriA 
TJejon Si, 



eOTRELL & LEONaRD, 



THE DERN TEA AND COFFEE CO. 

Dealers in TEAS, COFFEES, SPICES, 
EXTRACTS, BAKING POWDERS, Etc. 



Phone 575 



29 S. Tejon St. 



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The People's Qtocktj and Market 



PHONE MAIN 868 



U 



S. JAMES & SON, Props. 



222 EAST PIKE'S PEAK 



Colorado Springs, Colorado 



ST, JOHN & BARNES 

Oldest and largest plumbing and heating 

establishment in city. Your 

patronage solicited 



Telephone 13 



206 N. Tejon St. 



Phone Main 151 



Established 1897 



D. W. SMITH 

FAMILY GROCER, TEA AND 
COFFEE MERCHANT . : : : : 
Orders Called for and Promptly Delivered 

731 N. Weber St. Colorado Springs, Colo. 



112 Pike's Peak Ave. 



Telephone 230 



THE COLORADO SPRINGS 
FUEL COMPANY 

H. C. HARMON, Manager. 

Retailers of all the best grades of 

eOAL, eOKE, WOOD and GHAReOAL 

Exclusive Agency in Colorado Springs for all 
coal mined by the Colorado Fuel & Iron Co. 

The best Colorado Springs Lignite Coal for 
both domestic and steam use furnished promptly. 



For Goodness Sake^^ 

Use TUDOR lower vein Coal 
It beats all other Lignite 

TUDOR COAL COMPANY, Cor. Cascade and Cucharas 

THE MISSES PICK 

dressmakers from the Cast 

Sf?ooms ^atfon ^/dsr.^ ^O SPt Ace's ^aa/e .^tfe. T/jastatra 

Students wishing a special course in Drawing, 
Water colors, Oil or China Paintings should call at 
ART STUDIO, 108 N. Tejon. MARION R. TORBUSH, 

Member of Art Institute, Chicago. 

The ©Id 
6urio Store 

Wholesale and Retail 
Dealers in 

GENUINE INDIAN GOODS AND 
CURIOSITIES 

. J. S. CANDELARIO, Prop., 
301 and 303 San Francisco Street, 
SANTA FE, N. M. 



Phone 556-B 



DOVGI^AS est HSTHBIUNGTON 

Architect 4: 

Rooms 15-16 Outwest Building, Colorado Springs, Colo. 



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* The Yoxixi^ Men^s Store* ♦ 



♦ CLOTHES FOR COLLEGE MEN 

4» Styles that have the **Snap and Go" required by the young fellows 

4i "Swell" three button » single-breasted sacks 

* Five button, single-breasted sacks and three button double-breasted sacks 

${0.00 to $20.00* 



4* 
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* SPECIAL DISCOUNT 

* TO STUDENTS 
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HOLBROOK & PERKINS 



THE DENVER EIRE CLAY CO. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 
AND DEALERS IN 



Chemical and Physicial Apparatus and Chemicafs X 



A FULL LINE OF LABORATORY SUPPLIES AND ASSAY GOODS 
Write for Illustrated Catalogues 



1742-1746 Champa Street, 



DENVER, COLORADO ; 



Excellent iPhotoffraphs 

at BINGHAM & WOOD'S, 18 S. Tejon 



^ H. C. COLBURN, Pfcs. 



E. A. COLBURN^ Jr., Scc'y and Trcas. 



The ^yintler4: ^yiutotnobile Co. 

LIVERY, STORAGE. REPAIRING 

Telephone Main 122 S-IO JV, /ifeifada A-Oe, Colorado Springes, Colo, 




O. E. HEMENWAY 



Groceries and Meats 



us South Tejon St 
Colorado Springs, Colorado 



4'«i'4'if*4*4>4>4*4>4»<i>4>4»4*4**i*4>«i>4'4>4>4»4>*i*«i>4»4>4'4>4>«i>4>4'4*«i*4>*i*4*«i»4'*l*<»4> 




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£H£ TIGCR 



Colorado College 



^ 



J 



\ 




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VOLl/MK VII. 



, 1904 

dumber 2. 



ft: 



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Special Rates to Students 

On Rented Pianos 




The KNIGHT - eAMPBELL 
Music (Sompany 



New Lennox Block 



Opposite North Park 



St. John Bros-r""^*^"'"""'"' 

Gas and Steam Fitters 

Hot Water Heating a Specialty 

Prompt attention given to Repair Work. 

Curtis goal go. 

Office 132 IV. Teion St. Telephone 91. 

Try "NEW RANGE" for the Kitchen, $400. 
BiTUMNOus Coal at Standard Prices. 

SELDOMRIDGE BROTHERS, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

Flour, Feed, Grain, Hay and Seeds 

108 South Tejon Street 

Bepairing while You Wait Satisfaction Guaranteed 

A complete plant of New Machinery for 
the Manufacture of Fin© Boots and Shoes 

The Lightning Shoe Shop 

BROWN & COMPANY 
We make a specialty of Shoes to Measure and Shoes for 
Cripples. 28V^ North Tejon St. Coloba do Springs 

Visiting Cards in Latest Styles. 

VftlT ^^ advertising in THE TIGER that we 

I UU. .......... appreciate your custom. 

/^ 22 E. Kiowa St. Thc Pfofflpt Prmtef J 



The 

Hassell Iron Works Co, 



Founders and IVIachinists 



2l/e 7l/eicome 



THE STUDENTS, 

new and old, at our studio, 

Corner Cascade and Kiowa 




^^ 



Dealer in Kodaks and Supplies. 



COLLEGE GOWNS, CAPS 

The Best Workmanship 
at Lowest Prices 

Silk Faculty Gowns and Hoods 




COX SONS & VININfi 

262 Fourth Avenue., NEW YORK 



F00T BALLS 

Pants, Nose Guards, 
Tennis Goods 
and Sweaters 



at Strangs 

119 Xortti Teion Street 



Mueth's 

Soda, Ice 6reain 

enXERING 

CHAS. T. FERTIG 

"^al Estate, Loans and Insurance 

29 N. Tejon Street 

Uhe Colorado Spr/n^s <^loral Co* 

FLORISTS 



y^'^ T^ortA Z7e/on Sfrsot 



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USE ELECTRIC LIGHT 
IN YOUR HOMES 



The Colorado Springs Electric Co, 



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THE TIGER 



Student's Book Store Books stationery; an Engi- 

neer's Supplies; College Pins 

and Watch Fobs. Century Tountain Pens $1 to $4, Waterman's $2.50 

^"*' "P REYER & PLATT. 



E. R. DURFEC 



The ANTLERS PRESSING and CLEANING CO. 



No. 5 West Huerfano 



Strict Attention, Good Work, Fair Prices, Prompt Delivery. Your orders solicited. Ladies and Gentle- 
men's work carefully done. 1 Also do Tailoring and Alterations. 



THE COLORADO SPRINGS CO. 

The Original Locators of 

Colorado Spr/nys and 7/fanitou 

is still offering for sale choice 
lots on North Weber Street 
and North Wahsatch Avenue 

Also lots for sale in other parts of Colorado Springs 
and in Manitou 

Apply at ROOM 8, OUTWEST BUILDING 

LOUIS STOCK steam Dye and Cleaning 

Office and Works, 115 N. Tcjon St. 

TELEPHONE 517-B 

Cleaning, Dyeing, Scouring in all its branches 

Ostrich Plumes Cleaned, Dyed and Curled 

Kid Gloves Dyed and Cleaned. 

GIDDINGS BROS, 

Fine dress Goods and Ladies' 
TAILOR Suits, Ladies' 
Furnishings 

Kiowa and Tejon Streets. 



CHARLES P. BENNETT 

Real Estate, Loans 
and Insurance,^ ^ 

NO. 5 PIKE'S PEAK AVENUE 

GEO. BRINK CO MPANY 

COFFEE ROASTERS 
Wholesale Teas^ Spices^ 
Extracts, Baking Powders 

HE. Kiowa St. Phone Main 779 Colorado Springs 

THE HEFLEY-ARCULARILS DRUG CO. 

Kodaks, Cameras and all kinds of Photographic 
Supplies. Developing and Printing for Amatuers. 
Free Delivery. 
Phone 144 21 South Tejon Street 



Fine Rooms for College 
Students. 1 16 E. Boulder 

ROOMS for Students of College. 
Strictly Modern, rates reasonable. 

6i6 N. Weber. 

A. G. SPAILDING 
& BROS. 



Athletic Outfitters. 

HENRY TAMR^ 

Druggist 

PRESCRIPTIONS 
TOILET ARTICLES 
STATIONERY 

All Popular Drinks Served 
at our Soda Fountain 

Plaza Hotel, Cor. Cache la Poudre & Tejon Sts. 

THE RUGBY=PRIMROSE COAL CO. 

HU Kinds of Fuel 

Phone 481-A West 44-A 21 N. TEJON ST. 



H.KRnwZ POReBLniN 

H, KRHNZ & 

Of»l<y 8 Chair Barber Shop in the City 
10672 B. Pike's Peak Ave. 



BATH TUBS 

e©., Barbers 



p. R. SMITH 



Try the Llectric Vibrassage IVfachine 
eOLeRADO SPRINGS, e0LG. 



THE riGBR. 



TRY THE 

NEW eOLLINS H©TEL 

erippie ereek. Colo. 

Home Dairy Restaurannt in connection 
Popular Prices 



STUDENTS 



Get your KODAK SUP- 



PLIES at GOERKB'S 
Only exclusive Photo Supply store in the city 
Opp. Opera House 21 N. Tejon 

We sell a GOOD FOUNTAIN PEN for $\ 

WHITNEY & GRIMWOOD 

Opera House Building 

We are agents for WATERMAN'S IDEAL FOUNTAIN 
Pens. Prices from $2.50 up. 



i^red S. J^aj/ner 

Watchmaker and Jeweler 

15 South Uej'on St, 

'Dr. To. bowler, 

DENTIST 

IS South TJejon St, 



G. W. Pauly, B. S., D. O. Mrs, Lona E. Pauly, B. S. D. O. 

Graduates of A. T. Still's College of Osteopathy, 

Kirksville, Mo. 

DR. & MRS. PAULY, ?IYs?&Y#s'^ 

Office, rooms 303-304 DeGraff Bldg. 118 N. Tejon St., Colo- 
rado Springs, Colo. Phones— Office Kedl272; Res. Red 323 
Hours 8 to 12 a. m., 1 to 5 p. m. 



C. W. WARSOP & CO.. 



205 N. Teion St. 



Draperies, Upholstery Goods, Furniture. Complete line of Screens, 
Pillows, Pillow Tops, Couch Covers, etc. 



hardware Bicycles 
a. S. BLHKE 

New Chainless Bicycle $35 and $20 
Rambler, Orient and National Automobiles 

Best Repair Shop in city 107 n. Cejon 


D. E. MONROE & CO. 
Prescription Druggist 

The best of Drugs, Stationery and Toilet Articles 

NO LIQUORS SOLD. 
eon Teioti S( Bijou Phone 311 Sf 331 


Coilct Parlors at 20 East Kiowa 

Also Room 52, Antlers Hotel 

No Apprentices. Only experienced help employed. 


For $(.00 Per Month 

/ Suit Sponged and Pressed each 'l^eek 
PANTATORILM i? east bijou 

Branch office opp Plaza Hotel. 


FRANK F. CRUMP 

FLORIST 

Phone 5»o 509 E. Columbia St. 

Special attention given to Telephone Orders. 


H. E. BOATRIGHT 

Public Stenographer 

33 GIDDINGS BLDG. 

Rates oc per 100 words, 50c per hr. extra carbons 5c per page 


PARK BAKERY '^^^ 


When in doubt, take the safe side. 

SEND BUNDLES TO THE 


Finest Coffee and Lunch Room in the City 


Colorado Springs Laundry 


J. SCHACrER, Prop., Colorado Springs, Colo. 


Est. 20 yrs. RALPH RiCE. College Agt. 



Hastings Bros. S 



BlILDERS Witt build you a Home. Easy 
Tejon Street monthly Payments Phone 702-A 



nhe TlOCIt 



Vol. VII. 



COLORADO COLLEGE. SEPTEMBER 22, 1904. 



No. 2 



FIRST IMPRESSIONS OF THE 

WEST. 



It was a glorious moonlight night, and the 

New England girl sat at the car window, the 

soft night wind blowing in her face, and gazed 

dreamily at the country flying past. 

^ "We cross the Mississippi in a few minutes," 

said her companion. 

"I can hardly believe it,' she said. "I have 
wanted to see it for so long." The train stopped 
and then crept slowly on. The girl shut her eyes. 
The hollow sound peculiar to a train crossing a 
bridge attracted her attention. She looked and 
saw lights and their reflections in the water. 

"This isn't the Mississippi?" she asked incredu- 
Icusly. Only that morning she had looked abso- 
lutely unbelieving at the expanse of Lake Erie, as 
it stretched away like an ocean, and here in a 
few short moments the Mississippi was crossed. 
The girl who had known only New England but 
had dreamed of seeing the Mississippi, went to 
bed in disgust. 

The morning brought stretches of corn, vast 
and unending. The New England girl, fascin- 
ated, was watching the sunflowers. She had seen 
them grow slenderer of stalk and of petal, and 
more delicate of hue. Where she had seen a few 
clusters of blossoms now she looked upon a wild 
profusion. Here she saw great fields of them, and 
again, the yellow blossoms, scattered through the 
corn, swayed with the dark masses of stately 
green. 

The sun set and the gathering twilight brought 
■c.v, uncanny atmosphere to the desolate and for- 
saken plains. It was an almost incredulous girl 
who looked out to find only the rolling prairie 
as far as she could see, and it was with amaze- 
ment that she saw the yellow and blue tones which 
she had never dreamed of in nature before. 

It was when she found herself really at the foot 
of the Rocky Mountains that she realized her 
disappointment in them. They had neither the 
soft green majesty of the White Mountains nor 
the shining white glory of the pictured Alps. In 
the full and uncompromising light of the morn- 
ing sun, they seemed to her like massive dumps 
of brown dirt. 

"But where is Pike's Peak?" she asked, doubt- 



fully. "That Pike's Peak!" She preserved a dis- 
creet silence, but she thought a great many 
thoughts. She had fancied the peak slender, 
pointed, snow-capped, and standing out impress- 
ive and alone. Here it was one of many, brown 
and round, rising in a superior sort of way, with 
one shoulder hitched up higher than the other. 
Goody-goody was the only word that seemed to de- 
scribe it, and morning after morning she got up 
with an uncofitrollable desire to shake her fist 
at it. It was later that she met with unceasing 
jeers and laughter when she inadvertently re- 
marked that she would give the whole range for 
one glimpse of Mt. Tom. 

One night when the moon was shining with the 
dazzling brilliancy of Colorado moons, she was 
prevailed upon to sleep out of doors. She lay and 
Avatched the soft clouds drift across the moon and 
fell asleep, marveling on the wonders of a dry 
climate. 

It seemed but a moment before she was 
awakened to find herself in a perfect hurricane 
of wind. She clung desperately to the coverings 
and was trying to accustom herself to existing 
conditions when without warning a torrent of 
rain descended. She buried her head under the 
light bed clothes and groaned inwardly. Had 
she not been assured that it never rained in Colo- 
rado? She smiled grimly to herself. 

A heavily sweet smell now filled the air about 
her. It was new and absolutely different from 
anything she had ever smelled before. After this 
she often noticed it in the morning and evening. 
She felt as if she had been endowed with a sixth 
sense, for her companions could never detect it. 
She always thought of it as the smell of Colo- 
rado. 

She gradually became accustomed to changing 
her wraps indiscriminately, without regard to her 
New England bringing up, which absolutely for- 
bade one's removing a heavy coat or furs in the 
middle of the day and donning a light summer 
jacket. 

One bright morning she sallied forth to break- 
fast in a white shirt waist and breathed in the 
fresh morning air with delight. She seated her- 
self at the table and replied to interested in- 
quiries on the weather, that it was warm and 



THB TIGBR 



bright. The look of amazement she had grown 
to know so well passed round the table, and 
she learned that the thermometer stood at eight 
degrees below zero. Henceforth and forever, the 
New England girl kept firmly in the background 
when the weather was under discussion. 

In December when she picked violets in the 
garden or felt the sun hot on her cheek, a sort 
of shiver went over her. To her it seemed un- 
real and unnatural. It was as weird and uncanny 
as if she had waked to find the sun shining in 
the middle of the night. She dreamed that she 
heard the sleet against the windows, and she 
Icnged unceasingly for a northeast storm. 

But these were but first impressions, and it 
was not long before the New England girl grew 
to — ah, but as Kipling says, "That is another 
story !" 




NEW FACULTY MEMBERS. 




Prof. Fred Crabtree. 

Mr. Crabtree graduated from the Massachu- 
setts Institute of Technology in '89. Since that 
time he has been engaged in iron and steel work 
all over the country. First he was chemist in the 
steel works at Joliet, then in charge of the blast 
furnaces at Chicago. Later the Monongahela Iron 
and Steel Works at McKeesport, Pa., had him as 
chief chemist. He has been superintendent of 
tlie blast furnaces for several other companies. 



Dr. Henry A. Ruger. 

The man who takes Dr. Lancaster's place as 
?ssistant professor of Philosophy and Pedagogy 
is Henry A. Ruger. He took his degree of A. B. 
at Beloit in '95, and the following year was edu- 
cational director of the Young Men's Christian 
Association of Omaha. For the next four years 
he was principal of the Port Byron Acaderhy, at 
Port Byron, Illinois. In the year 'oo-'oi Mr. Ru- 
ger was a graduate student at the University of 
Chicago, and in 'oi-'o3 was fellow in Philosophy 
at the University of Wisconsin. Last year he was 
assistant in Psychology at Columbia University. 




Prof. Geo. J. Lyon. 

Mr. Lyon took his degree of B. S. from the 
University of Nebraska in '99. For the next few 
years he was gaining practical experience in rail- 
road work, structural steel work, and municipal 
engineering. In '04 he took the degree of C. E. 
from Columbia University. Mr. Lyon takes es- 
pecial interest in the machine shops of Colorado 



THH TIGHR 



College, which are rapidly improving in facilities. 
A Riehle testing machine which gives a pressure 
of 100,000 pounds is now on the way. This will 
l)e of immense importance to the students, en- 
abling them to test various buildinar materials, and 
obtain definite results from their work. 



FOOTBALL. 



The gretest desire of every loyal student of 
Cutler Academy has at last been realized — we 
are to have a football team. 

At the meeting of the Council Merrill was 
elected temporary captain and Bernard manager. 
There are now over fifteen fellows out every 
night at practice, and they are developing rapidly, 
specially as so few have ever played before. 

It is interesting to know that although many 



of the fellows are out for the first time, yet there 
are quite a few old players. AUibrand from 
Sunnyside High of Pittsburgh, Hutchison of the 
C. S. Y. M. C. A., and Tuttle of Los Angeles 
High are well "versed" in football and are of 
great service in getting the material into shape. 

The lineup is at present indefinite, but the can- 
didates for positions are : Willet, center ; Haight, 
Sechrist and McGowan, guards; Stauffer and 
Tuttle, tackles; Hoover, Currier, Lundy, ends; 
Graham, Willfley, Dickerman, Hutchinson, bitcks. 
AUibrand will probably play a tackle and alter- 
n.ate in the back field. Graham and Hutchison 
will do the punting as both are doing well now. 

Taken all in all, the prospects are the best. 
The schedule has not been very definitely ar- 
ranged, but offers for games are not lacking, and 
Manager Bernard promises a fine line of games. 



BIG BLOODY BATTLE. 



Sophs Score Complete Victory — Enemy Annihilated, 



By Tiger Special Leased Wire. 

Caramillo Street, Sept, 21, 11 P. M.— The 
Sophokis have completely overwhelmed the 
Freshovitches in a pitched battle, with the com- 
plete surrender of the besieging forces. Things 
began to go their v\ ay early in the campaign, when 
the Freshovitches captured the renowned com- 
mander Androgo. On a plea of having some 
work to do the wily commander was released. 
Later in the day another Sophoki was also cap- 
tured, bound and gagged, but being left alone, 
managed to escape. All the Sophokis reached the 
fort early in the evening except four. 
THE SIEGE. 

The Freshoviteches now proceeded to lay siege 
to the fortress in hopes of starving the enemy 
out. That did not seem to work, for the be- 
sieged seemed to have unlimited provisions. Then 
they tried a new plan of attack, known as the 
"hot air" bravado. But the only result was that 
they were told they might "swing on the gate." 
New troubles were encountered when they tried 
taking the contraband of war (hose) from a 
neutral power. The Peace Tribunal compelled 
them to deliver up the goods. Numerous repre- 
sentatives of the great world powers appeared 
on the scene from time to time, and threatened 
vengeance if silence were not observed, but as 
the whole thing was noise, it seemed hardly fair 
to cut that out. The non-combatants were thrown 
into confusion by the report that they were ac- 
tually playing "postoffice" inside. There seemed 



to be danger of a general attack. The curfew now 
rang, and half of the Freshovitches being under 
fifteen, had to go home. They went so fast it 
recalled old times, when Whatcher Givenus used 
to sprint. 

THE SORTIE. 

' However, the attack came from the other side. 
The enemiy had been reinforced by the addition 
of four men, including their commander-in-chief, 
Sciku. The sally took the besiegers by surprise, 
and soon half of them were biting the dust. Had 
all of them shown the spirit of Thomski there 
would have been a different tale to tell, but as 
it was each was treated to a cold shower bath, 
and turned loose on parole swearing never again 
to bear arms against his most noble enemy. One 
of them was heard to wish most earnestly that 
he had been driven away from the scene of action 
an hour before. Altogether it was an exceed- 
ingly meek bunch of Freshovitches that dripped 
its way home in the large hours of the night. 
The cold water cure seems to be an excellent 
thing for reducing swellings. 

AFTERMATH. 

On a little wooden slab on a raised mound at 
the scene of battle is to be read the inscription : 

o ■ . -o 

I HIC JACET ERESHMAN | 



OBIIT SEPT. 21, 1904. 
REQUIESCAT IN PACE. 



Sic transit gloria mundi. 



THE TIGBR. 



THE TIGER 

Published weekly during the College year by 
The; Tiger Publishing Co., in the interest of Colo- 
rado College. 

J. Y. Crothers Editor-in-Chief 

T. Hunter Assistant Editor-in-Chief 

J. I. Muf fley Athletic Editor 

Miriam Carpenter Literary Editor 

Mabel Barbee Alumni Editor 

A. H. Fisher Local Editor 

Bert Wasley Business Manager 

C. A. Hedblom Assistant Business Manager 

CORRESPONDENTS : 

Mr. Nash, Mr. Nead, Miss McDowell, Miss Isham, 
Mr. Willis, Miss Kidder, Mr. Anderson. 

Subscription, $1.25 per year, payable in advance. 
Single copy, 5 cents. 

The; Tiger is forwarded to all subscribers until 
ordered discontinued and all arrearanges are paid. 

Students, Professors and Alumni are invited 
to contribute literary articles, personals and items. 
Contributions must be accompanied by the writer's 
name. 

Address all communications to The Tiger, 
Colorado College, Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Entered at the Postoffice at Colorado Springs, 
Colo., as second-class matter. 



Patronize Tiger Advertisers 



EDITORIAL 

r\URING the present year The Tiger will make 
its appearance on Thursday afternoon in- 
stead of Wednesday, as last year. This change 
is made necessary by the schedule of some of 
the Board. 



PUBLIC SPEAKING. 

HTHE election of the officers of the Oratorical 
Association of Colorado College calls to mind 
the fact that this is to be the greatest year in 
the history of the College in the line of oratory. 
All of the state contests are to be held in this 
city this winter, which should be enough to 
rouse unprecedented enthusiasm. The prizes 
offered are always worth consistent and sustained 
effort. Aside from mere pecuniary considera- 
tions, the contestant receives incalculable ben- 
efit in the training of facing large audiences — 
at least they should be large. Colorado Col- 
lege has not held the position in the state in 
oratory which it should hold, and which it will 
hold this year if the students take up the work 



with enthusiasm. There is ah abundance of ora- 
tcrical material in College this year, which needs 
but careful training and the Tiger Spirit to en- 
able it to sweep everything before it. 



THE FOOTBALL GAME 

IVl EXT Saturday afternoon comes the first reg- 
ular football game of the year, the game 
with the local High School. In years past the 
High School used to win with ease, when playing 
aganist the College. Then came the time when 
the College ran up big scores, but now the spec- 
tators are assured an interesting contest. Every 
student should be at the game and learn some 
College yells. If we are to win the champion- 
ship this year there must be hearty support on 
the part of all the students. This support mani- 
fests itself in the games in the form of rooting. 
A rooters' club should be formed this week, and 
should be one of the most flourishing clubs in 
college. In some of the larger universities even 
the girls have rooting clubs whose influence is 
felt quite acutely by opposing teams. What'i 
the matter with the Rooters' Club ? It's all right 1 
What's all right.? The Rooters' Club. 



PHI BETA KAPPA. 

A MONG the most important events of the open- 
ing of the year for Colorado College was its 
admission into the most select fraternity in the 
country, the Phi Beta Kappa. Only universities 
and colleges of the highest grade are admitted 
into this organization, consequently a membership 
in it is the goal of the ambition of every young 
institution of higher education. If there have 
been any doubts in the minds of the people as 
to the fact that our standards are as high as 
those of Eastern universities, they will be dis- 
pelled by our admission into Phi Beta Kappa. 
The Faculty of the College has already an or- 
ganization whose numbers reflect honor on the 
scholarship of our instructors. It is interest- 
ing to note that of the three institutions ad- 
mitted into Phi Beta Kappa this year, two are 
in Colorado. We congratulate our brother insti- 
tution, the State University, on the recognition of 
its high standing as shown by its admission, also, 
into this fraternity. 



CALENDAR. 



FRIDAY, SEPT. 22. 

4 :oo P. M.— Minerva, Apollonian Club House. 

4 :30 P. M.— Hypatia, Room 12, Perkins. 

7 :oo P. M.— Y. W. C. A., Ticknor Study. 

7 -30 P. M.— Apollonian, Club House. 

7 :30 P. M.— Pearsons, Cutler. 

7 :30 P. M.— Miltonian, Room 12, Perkins. 



THB TIGBR. 



SATURDAY^ SE^PT. 24. 

3 ;oo P. M.— Football, Tigers vs. High School, 
Washburn Field. Admission, 25c. 
Freshman Party, time and place un- 
known. 
SUNDAY^ SEPT. 25. 
-Y. M. C. A., Cutler. Special music. 



4 :oo P. M. 



ANNOUNCEMENT. 



Five contests in public speaking are to be held 
at Colorado College during the coming year. 
Those who wish to enter should decide the 
matter now and begin preparation at once. The 
contests, in the order in which they will come, 
are as follows. The Freshman- Sophomore Prize 
Contest in Declamation, the Intercollegiate Ora- 
toracal Contest in which the four colleges of 
the state contend, the Inter-State Debate with 
the University of Utah, and the Memorial Day 
Contest in Oratory. Besides these there is also 
the Inter-Society Debate between the ApoUonians 
and Pearsons. 

The Freshman-Sophomore Prize Contest in 
Declamation will be held Dec. 14. The prizes 
will be in cash — $15 and $10 respectively. Four 
speakers from each class will be selected in a 
preliminary contest about Nov. 26th. 

The State Oratorical Contest between the four 
colleges of Colorado will be held at Colorado 
College on Feb. 17th, and the preliminary con- 
test in which our two best speakers will be 
chosen may be expected three weeks or a month 
before that time. ■ Prizes in the final contest are 
respectively $25 and $15. Colorado College has 
not won this contest in several years, and time 
is now ripe for a victory. In this contest we 



are not outclassed in any way. We ought to 
win every time. We did it years ago, and with 
the contest at home this year we can do it again. 

The debate with the University of Utah will 
be held here April 22nd. We had our first de- 
bate with Utah last year and were beaten, but 
luider such circumstances that we feel sure we 
will be able to return the compliment this year. 
A letter is now on the way to Utah asking their 
debating association to submit questions, and as 
bOon as a question is decided upon our men will 
begin work. The two contests above are under 
the direct management of the Oratorical and De- 
bating Association of the College. The officers, 
Mr. Givens, Mr. Albert and Mr. Muffley, will 
be glad to talk to you in regard to them. 

On the 30th of May will take place the Annual 
Memorial Day Contest in Oratory between the 
Apollonian, Pearsons and Miltonian Societies. 
The prizes given are books valued at $15 and $8 
respectively. This event is participated in by the 
Civil War veterans of Colorado Springs, Post 22 
of the Grand Army of the Republic. 

Look over the list above, decide what contest 
or contests you can enter to the best advantage, 
and begin to prepare at once. It ought not to 
l)e necessary to urge students to enter these con- 
tests. The benefits of the experience which they 
offer are self evident. If you expect to be a 
lawyer, a minister, or a teacher; if you expect 
to be active in public life, if you expect to count 
for something in your state or your community 
you should be able to make a speech, and these 
contests will give you just the experience you 
will need. 

I will be glad to see those who are planning 
to enter the contests and give them any assist- 
ance that I can. D0NAI.D D^WiTT. 




-tf4fi^F^F4f4f^F^f^f4F^F^I^ 



ATHLETIC 
DEPARTMENT 



FOOTBALL. 

The football squad did some good work last 
week under the instruction of Coaches Juneau 
and Frost. Most of the work was done on the 
campus, for Washburn Field was not in condi- 
tion. 

It is as yet a matter of conjecture what the 



College lineup will be when we face Boulder on 
October 29, but it is safe to say that the College 
will have a fine team of well-drilled players. The 
team is not so heavy as last year, nor is new ma- 
terial so plentiful, but there are eleven men in the 
squad who last year won their C's. Captain Len- 
nox and W. Lennox or Fisher will likely play 
the ends. Fisher is fast and gritty but lighter than 



THB TIGBR. 



Lennox, who is an experienced and aggressive 
player. Hill, who played a star game at half last 
year stands without a peer in the back field, 
'ihere are several candidates for right-half. Mor- 
gan seems to be the best. He is heady, gritty, 
arid a fierce line-bucker. Scibird is also being 
worked at half, and Fisk, Gibbs and Seybold are 
all good men and may be given a chance. Of 
course Randolph and Johnston will do the work 
at quarter-back. Randolph handles the team the 
better, but Johnston is stronger and faster. If it 
becomes necessary, Billy can give a good account 
of himself at either halfback or end. Vande- 
moer, Hedblom, Bale and Nead are reasonably 
certain to hold their places in the line, and How- 
bert and Faucett are being tried at tackle and 
guard respectively. Willis, Willet, Tucker and 
KauU are working hard, but are handicapped by 
lack of experience. The position of fullback 
seems to be the hardest to fill. Mack is being 
tried, but he has not had the experience so 
necessary for a man in that positon, and he can 
not drop kick or punt. But Mack is working 
hard, and he always plays a good game. 

Altogether the prospects are very bright. The 
team has a good nucleus of experienced players 
and there will be plenty of good substitutes. It 
i:-. plain that Coach Juneau knows his business, and 
with the aid of Coach Richards and his High 
School team for practice, Juneau will give the 
College a first class team. But if the team is to 
win, every player must regularly report for prac- 
tice. There are several members of last year's 
team who seem very indifferent about getting out 
for practice. We hope that the Senior course is 
not so stiff as to keep two of our best men off 
the gridiron. 

Students, on Saturday at 3 o'clock on Wash- 
burn Field, you will have an opportunity of see- 
ing the Tigers in actioi;!. They will meet the High 
School in the annual game, and some good foot- 
ball will be seen, for Coach Richards has a fast, 
husky bunch. Be out, one and all, and show 
the team that you are loyal. Let us take a per- 
sonal interest in every man who is trying for 
the team. They are giving their time and tak- 
ing the hardest kind of knocks all for their loy- 
alty to C. C. So let us show them that we can 
and do appreciate their work. 



TIGERS WON. 



Several of the College fellows with a little 
superfluous energy to work off have formed a 
bowling team and entered the city bowling league. 
They won their opening game last night by a 
good score, as may be seen below : 

dOLORADO COLI^EGE. 

Tyler 170 210 188 

Nash 160 104 136 



Smith 200 162 137 

French 122 137 116 

Bernard 160 160 181 

812 773 758—2343 

HENAGSr's COIvIvEGE. 

Henager 172 167 167 

Hahn 126 135 CI 

Duck .. 144 159 166 

Conway 172 133 I54 

Huber 159 167 146 

771 761 724 — 2256 



FOOTBALL SCHEDULE. 

Sept. 24 — Colorado Springs High School on 
Washburn Field. 

Oct. I — Centennial High School, Pueblo, Wash- 
burn Field. 

Oct. 8 — Denver University on Washburn Field. 
Practice game. 

Oct. 15 — Sacred Heart College, at Denver. 

Oct. 22— Alumni of Colorado College, on Wash- 
burn Field. 

Oct. 29 — Boulder, on Washburn Field. 

Nov. 5 — Denver University, at Denver. 

Nov. 12 — Aggies, at Ft. Collins. 

Nov. 19 — Miners, at Golden. 

On Thanksgiving Day in all probability the 
team from the University of Utah will try con- 
clusions with the Tigers. 



TIGER NOTES. 

TIGER NOTES. 
Miss Frothingham, '08, received a visit from 
her father last week. 

A few of the Academy girls have been enter- 
taining Montgomery lately with serenades. 

The following have been chosen as members 
of the House Committees : 

Ticknor — Misses Beach, Rudd and Williams. 

Montgomery — Misses Johnston, Simington and 
McDowell. 

The first Freshman party will be given Satur- 
day night. Please keep this quiet. 

Misses Hope and Ruth Smith entertained a 
number of College people last Thursday evening. 

All College students will sympathize with 
Misses Alda and Alice Myers in the loss of their 
grandmother, who died very suddenly early Sat- 
urday morning. 

New tape has been laid on the tennis courts. 



The fiG^R. 



The Sophomore Class has elected the following 
officers : 

President, Mr. Scibird. 
Vice-President, Mr. Howbert. 
Secretary-Treasurer, Miss Eleanor Pease. 



Miss Roberts gave a chafing dish party to 
the Freshman girls on the third floor in Mc- 
Gregor Hall. 

Caj. (to a Freshman girl) — ^Do not scribble 
on these new seats to save your life. 



The Minerva gave its opening dance on Satur- 



McGregor Freshman who lives on third floor 
rushes wildly into the corresponding room on 
second floor and finding it unfamiliar announces day evening in McGregor Gymnasium. 

to her friends that "The Sophs have changed ev- 

erything in my room V 



Some of our fellows have been "hashing" at 
the Antlers the last few days. 

The Sophs and Freshmen have elected officers. 
Look out for scraps. 

Drysdale has gone to Ann Arbor. 

Visits to Hucacode Cave are now in style. 

The Oratorical Association elected the follow- 
ing officers : Givens, President ; Albert, Vice- 
President ; Muffley, Secretary and Treasurer. 

The Freshmen have elected as temporary of- 
ficers: Sill, President; Miss Price, Secretary. 

The Junior Class has added to its numbers an 
Irish maid. Miss O'Ball. 

The Minerva dance was certainly the success 
of the week. 

Miss Shepard, ex-'o5, left for Vassar Monday 
evening. 

The girls are looking forward with great in- 



The Freshman Class effected a temporary or- 
ganization after chapel on Friday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Crawford of Denver visited their 
daughter. Miss Helen Crawford, last Sunday. 

■ The Pearsons Society serenaded the girls' halls 
Friday evening. 

Prof Ahlers (to a fellow in German B) — You 
translate like you were trying to push sausage 
through a iunnel. 

Miss Whitehead, '06, spent a few days in the 
Springs last week. She will be at the University 
of Wisconsin this year. 

Miss Kidder entertained at a fudge party Sat- 
urday night, in honor of Miss Whitehead. 

Clara Orr, '06, who was at Oberlin last year, 
is back at C. C. again. 

Contemporary picnic Saturday was a great suc- 
cess and everyone reported a fine time. 

The Junior Class held a meeting Friday and 
elected the following officers : President, Miss 
Barbee; Vice-President, T. Hunter; Secretary 



terest to some interesting games of hockey this ''^"^ Treasurer, W. Johnston, 
winter. 



The Misses Rudd, Brush and Smedley enter- 
tained about twenty-five friends at a birthday 
party in honor of Misses Sammons and Carpen- 
ter Friday night. 

The canons and Manitou are very popular now- 
adays. 

Did you ever take dinner at the Cliff House — 
Sunday noon? They did. 

Mr. Charles Liddell of Golden has been visit- 
ing friends for a few days. 

Cupid has been playing havoc with quite a num- 

Miss Flora McGee is spending a few days ber of our Alumni during the last few months. 

visiting friends in the College. Lillian Chapman, ex-'o4, was married the early 

part of the summer to Mr. George Merrill. They 

McPherson is at Boulder this year. will make their home in Salt Lake City. 



Miss Ada Taylor is a new girl at McGregor. 

Don't forget the football game on Saturday. 

That staid and dignified Senior, Berticus Was- 
ley, made a very dignified (?) descent from the 
third story one night last week. 

That girl in the Freshman Class who tele- 
graphed the Dean on what train she would ar- 
rive must have — . . 



ALUMNI NOTES. 



to THB TIGBR. 

Miss Myrtle Herring, ex-'o2, and Mr. Guy At- Earl Cooley, formerly captain of the baseball 

kinson were married last June. They are now learn and star halfback, was in Colorado Springs 

touring Europe. last week. Since Mr. Cooley's graduation from 

the College in 1900 he has been practicing law in 

The marriage of Lester McLean, '99, and Grace Trinidad. He is now in Denver attending the 

Smith, '00, occurred August i6th. Mr. and Mrs. Republican state convention, to which he is a 

McLean left immediately for Japan. delegate from Las Animas county. 

^, J J. r ^ T^ n^u '^^ ^A Miss Pearl Kelley, '02, is teaching in the Du- 

The weddmg of Grace D. Thompson, 02, and ,01/ 

„ T mi T-v 1- £ rT\ ■ ■■, , 1 rango High bchool. 

Dr. J. Thomas Dowhng of Trmidad was sol- * * 

emnized September 7th. 1 r. 1 . 1 x -d ^ 

Eva Canon, 04, left last week for Boston, 

where she will study library work under Miss 

The engagement of Elsie Rowell, '99, and ^^^^^.^^ -^ Simmons College. 

Francis Smith of Seattle has been announced. 

Wm. L. Hogg, '04, was a visitor at -College last 

Miss Enid Jones, ex-'o6, has announced her en- week. It is understood that he intends to con- 

gagement to Glenville A. Collins, ex-'o5. tmue the study of law at Columbia. 

SOCIETIES AND ASSOCIATIONS 

APOLLONIAN. CONTEMPORARY. 

Opening address Pres. Keyes Contemporary will entertain the new girls Sat- 

Solo Bybee "^day evening. 

Declamation Bartlett 

Speech Hunter MILTONIAN. 

Declamation Albert 

Boxing, four-round contest The meeting next Friday will be closed. 

Randolph and Johnston 

Referee, Dr. Finlay. 

Visitors welcome. HYPAiiA. 

There will be a closed meeting next Friday. 

MINERVA. All members are requested to be present. 

The Development of the English Drama — 

"History of Drama in General" . . . Miss Welling 

"First Forms of English Dramatic Compo- _ ^ . , . . . . , , , 

.,. „ TVT- f^ 1 1- Last Jbriday an mformation meetmg was held 

sition Miss Spalding . , . , , , , ,.^^ . , , 

un ^ ^- r T- 1 -ni » Tv/r- T 1 "^ which was brought out the different ideals 

Presentation of an Early Play Miss Isham ^ 1 •-,,*• • , t^ 

e ior which the Association stands. Reports from 

Jsong . 

_^ the various committees were read and also the 

policy adopted by the Cabinet for this year. 
PEARSONS. 

Roll Call Mark Twain Y. M. C. A. 

Paper — "History of the Russo-Jap War" .... 

Thomas Last Sunday Dr. E. W. Work spoke before 

Debate— "Resolved, That Japanese sovreign- the two Christian 'Associations. His subject was 

ty in Korea would be desirable." the thesis, "The Bible Is an Interesting Book." 

Affirmative Lamb, Angell Certainly his address was interesting. The at- 

Negative Hedblom, Muf fley tendance was about fifty. Crothers presided. The 

Speeches — meeting was held in Ticknor study. 

"Football" Lennox Next Sunday the associations will meet sep- 

"G^^^ts" Shaw arately. The Y. M. C. A. meeting will be held 

"The Eden Disaster" Scibird in Cutler Academy at 4 p.m. It will be in 

Music— Selected charge of the Missionary Committee, and Willis 

Visitors welcome. will preside. 



TUB TIGHR. 



tt 



ACADEMY DEPARTMENT 

Earle S. Alden Kditor 



HESPERIAN. 



ACADEMY NOTES. 



With an impetus characteristic of the society 
the work for tlie year started last Friday night 
at the business meeing held in Cutler Academy, 
'i'he session was taken up with discussion for 
the good of the society and the transaction of rou- 
tnie business. There were ten new names pro- 
posed for membership, which augurs well for the 
ytar's work. 

The points emphasized in the general discus- 
sion were that the society's aim is, and will be 
more and more, quality and not quantity. Not 
only applied to the membership, but to the work 
done as well. Our standards, which have al- 
ways been high in the past, are to be made higher, 
and the society will doubtless branch out in 
many ways, taking up work of a more varied 
kmd and laying special stress on declamation and 
cratory, though by no means neglecting the more 
aistinctly literary side of its work. In the past 
our debating has been made less effective from 
the lack of proper expression, and it will be one 
of the primary aims of our work along this line 
to strengthen that side of debating. 

The officers for the first semester are as fol- 
lows : 

President, Alden. 

Vice-President, Walter. 

Secretary-Treasurer, Conklin. 

Next Friday night there will be a short pro- 
gram, one of the features of which will be an 
address by Prof. Gile, and to this meeting all of 
the boys of the Academy are cordially invited, in 
order that they may get some notion of the work 
we do, rather than that they may be entertained, 
it is impossible to sum up the aim of the society 
in fewer or better words than by quoting from 
the Constitution, in which the following clause 
appears : 

"The object of this society shall be to obtain 
that profit and pleasure which is derived from 
active participation in debating and other literary 
exercises." 

Male students of Cutler Academy are eligible 
for membership, and the society's aim is to 
gather together a body of fellows who enjoy 
work along these lines, and at the same time to 
call attention to the word "pleasure" in the above 
clause. In order that we may have as much 
pleasure as possible in carrying on this work, 
we want a crowd of fellows who have common 
interests and who are as congenial as possible, 
and to this end all new students are invited to 
visit us and get acquainted. 



Where are the girls ? The boys certainly have 
the best of it this year. 

Waiter, VViliett and Mitchell were among those 
wiio chmbed Pike's Teak last Saturday night. 

Bell Sinton, ex-'o5, will be in Throup Insti- 
tute, California, this year. 

C. A. '04 has a goodly representation in C. C. 
this year. 

Among the faces we miss are those of Yeo- 
man, Crapo and Espy. 

Moore came in late and will probably be in 
tne Fourth Class. 

Here's to the largest class C. A. ever gradu- 
ate — " '05." 

Among the wanderers who have come back to 
the fold are: Mitchell, Hoover and McGowan. 
"After all, there's no place like C. A.," is the 
verdict of every one of them. 

The Eong Trouser Brigade has two recruits 
from last year. Who'll be the next? 

The English classes unite in saying that Miss 
Brown is the nicest teacher on the Faculty. 
There are those, however, who secretly have 
offered to wager that when she does come, there 
won't be another cut this year. 

Miss Worster and Mr. Hall are new members 
of the Academy Faculty. 

Academy Freshmen should always • call them- 
selves First Classmen, otherwise it might be 
confusing. Freshmen all are very much alike, 
after all. 

Hoover (pulling a long, dark hair off his coat 
sleeve)— Gee! I don't believe this coat has been 
brushed since I left Denver. 



TIGER NOTES- 
ATHLETIC BOARD. 

Two student members of the Athletic Board 
are to be elected after Chapel, Friday, Sept. 30. 



fHU TlCUR. 



J. A. Pettibone intends to enter the Harvard 
Law School next month. 

W. D. Van Nostran, '03, begins his law course 
at D. U. this month. Owing to illness Mr. Van 
Nostran was compelled to leave school at Christ- 
mas time last year. He is now entirely recov- 
ered and hopes to win his degree in two years. 

The new entrance to Washburn Field adds 
very much to its appearance. Everyone should 
become familiar with it, and learn to read the let- 
ters backwards. See? 

All fellows should register for the presidential 
election if they have lived long enough in the 
precinct, county, state and world. The girls 
could vote in this state, but that would betray 
their age, so we shall not look for them at the 
pools. 

The poor old Library ! If you sit at the long 
cenlertable and look at the finger marks on the 
swinging doors you will be more careful in the 
future. Then, too, we are in danger of an eth- 
ical address whose subject "has been suggested 
1c me by a" bicycle leaning against the porch of 
Coburn. There are racks outside for all bicycles. 



EXCHANGES. 

Professor (exasperated) — Why don't you speak 
louder ? 

Pupil — A soft answer turneth away wrath. 

"How do you know that Caesar had an Irish 
sweetheart? 

'-Because when he came to the Rhine he pro- 
posed to Bridget." 

An absent-minded -professor, instead of put- 
ting a mustard plaster on his chest, put it on 
his bald head. He went out on the street soon 
after — it was a cold winter day — but soon re- 
turned and asked his wife for his umbrella, say- 
ing that he found the heat of the sun unbear- 
able. 

Three is a crowd, and there were three. 
The girl, the parlor lamp, and he. 
Two is company, and no doubt 
That is why the lamp went out. 

Back Street, 

Banana Peel, 
Fat Man, 

Virginia Reel. 

The Rat (breathless) — Goodness! here comes 
the cat; I suppose the lunch is on me. 



"Is Mr. Fusse much afraid of microbes?" 
"Well, I should say; he washes the antiseptic 
gloves he wears in an antiseptic fluid before he 
ever handles the sterilized glass that contains the 
boiled and filtered mineral water he intends to 
drink." — Baltimore Herald. 



Thomas Millinery cordially invite you to their 
semi-annual opening of Imported Hats, Fur Sets 
and Millinery Novelties, Wednesday afternoon 
and evening, Sept. 14, 1904. 13 S. Tejon street. 



Frank H. Small, jeweler and silversmith, 113 
Pike's Peak avenue, watches, diamonds, fine 
watch work, repairing. Special price "to students. 



A Symposium. — "What is the secret of suc- 
cess ?" asked the Sphinx. ■ 

"Push," said the button. 

"Never be led," said the pencil. 

"Take pains," said the window. 

"Always keep cool," said the ice. 

"Be up-to-date," said the calendar. 

"Do business on tick," said the clock. 

"Never lose your head," said the barrel. •' 

"Make light of everything," said the fire. 

"Do a driving business," said the hammer. 

"Aspire to greater things," said the nutmeg. 

"Be sharp in your dealings," said the knife. 

"Never do anything off hand," said the glove. 

"Do the work you are suited for," said the flue. 

"Trust to your stars for success," said the 
night. 

"Spend much time in reflection," said the 
■ mirror. 

"Strive 
the seal. 

"Get a 
door bell. 

"Make much of small things," said the mi- 
croscope. 

"Turn all things to your advantage," said 
the lathe. 

"Find a good thing and then stick to it," said 
the glue. 

"Make the most of your good points," said the 
compass. 

"Be always on the lookout for a snap," said 
the camera. 

"Be ever ready to do a good turn for any one," 
said the crank. 

"Never take sides, but be round when you are 
wanted," said the ball. — The Courant, Western 
University of Pennsylvania. 



to make a good impression," said 
good pull with the ring," said the 



Students, if in need of glasses or repairs on 
same, see Ashby, the Optical Jeweler, the oldest 
established in the county. You will find every- 
thing right. 



THE TIGER 



13 



*.'? 







THE eRESeENT HLLEYS MclNTIRE S JENNINfiS 113=117 N. Cascade 



next 



You are next to a good hair cut or shave when you patronize 



The Manhattan Barber Shop, J. R. WEYMAR, Prop, 3o e. bijou 



WHITAKER & GARDNER 

30 N. TEJON ST. 

Headquarters for 

golleqe Shoes 

OF EVERY DESCRIPTION 

We have the best mining and civil engineering boot 
in the market 

WHITAKER & GARDNER 



^h 



AUNDr^Y 



THE STAR is the leader for prompt 
and satisfactory service. 

SPECIAL RATES to students of col- 
lege and academy 

S. E. BENNETT, College Ag't. 



SEE OUR 
WINDOW 



College Pillow Tops 

7 Views. Best Souvenir or Gift Yet 

Ashford & Roberts 

126 N. Tejon St. 

t5 per cent discount io students on framing 



w. I. Lueas 



Columbia, Hartford , Rambler, Ideal & Tribune Bicycles 

The only first-class re air shop in town. Chainlets wheels 
a specialty. Wheels for rent. Phoue517-\. I29N. Tejon 

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Cigars, Tobacco and Periodicals === Cripple Creek 



Every St\iclet^t 

Buy Shoes where the Style and 
PRICES AKE RIGHT 



y 116 



S ENTITLED to a Special Discount on the best Shoes made at 
118 Soulh Tejon Street R. y^. HANDY SHOE CO. 



14 



THB TIGBR 



Colorado College 



THE OLDEST INSTITUTION FOR 
HIGHER EDUCATIOiS[ IN THE WEST 

FOUNDED AT COLORADO 
SPRINGS IN 18 74 



Colorado College now offers advantages of the same 
grade as the best institutions. 

For information concerning Courses of Study, Rooms 
and Board, Physical Culture, etc., apply to 

WM. F. SLOCUM, President, 
or EDWARD S. PARSONS, Dean.. 

For information in regard to the College Department of 
Music, inquire of 

EDWARD S. PARSONS, Dean. 

Those wishing information as to the Courses in Drawing, 
Painting, Designing, etc., etc., inquire of 

EDWARD a PARSONS, Dean. 

For information concerning the Engineering Depart- 
ment, apply to 

FLORIAN CAJORI, 
Dean of Engineering School. 



Cutler Academy 



Cutler Academy is the Associated Prepartory School of 
Colorado College, in which students are prepared for any 
American College. Address, 

M. C. GILE, Principal. 



THE TIGER 



15 



The Albert Sechrist Manufacturing Co. 

WILL INSTALL GAS and 



1033 16th 
Street 



* 



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in your residence at Colorado Springs 
same price as Denver, without extra 
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or will send you a catalogue. 



DENVtR, 
COLO. 




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1633 Arapahoe Street 



DENVER 



Office Phone 509-B 



ResideNce Phone Red 871 



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Hours 9-12, 1:30-5 



First N4tM Bank BIdg., room 8 



The 50-mile-an-hour Wheel 

Reading Standard Bicycles 



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VEE WIING 

m\mm. Km mmmm, 

24 E. Kiowa St. Colorado Springs, Colo. 



ROOMS 



Finely furnished. At 73Q N. Weber 

FOR RENT: Very reasonable. 
Large, light, comfortable mod- 
ern Rooms. 218 East Dale. 



NEW EMPIRE THEATRE 3 shows Daily ^« l Matinee 3 P. M 

Evenings 7:30 and 8:45 



IOC 



VAUDEVILLE- 



IOC 



i6 



THB TIGBR. 



El Paso Cleaning & Tailoring Co> 

10 E. Kiowa St. Phone Main 667=A Colo. Springs 



Pressing Dyeing Altering 

Cleaning Repairing Tailoring 



Prof. Chas. J. Hausdorf 

TEACHER or MANDOLIN, GUITAR AND BANJO 

Music furnished for weddings, receptions, 

entertainments, etc. 

21 North Tejon. 



ESTABLISHED 1878 

AIKEN 5 
MUSEUM 

COLORADO SPRINGS COLO 



C. F. Arcularius &Co» 
Jewelers 

Diamonds and Watches 

Fine Jewelry Manufacturing 

9 South Tejon St. Colorado Springs 

The 

Crissey & Fowler Lumber 
Company 

Phone 101 117 to 123 West Vermijo Ave. 

For 'Prompt attention and Salisfadory 
Work, patronize the 

Monarch Hand 
Laundry 

KARL L. MOHLER, Prop. 
W. J. WALLRICH, College Agt. 

A perfect fiUtng shirt necessitates hand %)ork 
Phone 540 329 E. Pikes Peak Ave, 

FINE CHOCOLATE BON BONS 



Name on every Piece 

Ice Cream, Hot and Cold 

Sodas 

Fresh Candies made exery hour 



UNION ICE AND COAL COMPANY 

W. M. BANNING, Prop. 




Coalt mood atid Tec 

Dealers in all kinds of Coal and Artificial and 
Natural Ice 

YardOffice, 105 W, Vermijo Ave. City Office, 5 N. Tejon 




Moles and Superflous Hair removed witli Electricity 
Hair Goods made to Order 

nirs^ Htina Betbinatit 

HAIR DRESSING PARLORS 

27 E. Kiowa Phone Red 394 Ladies Bath 

Colorado Springs, Colo. 



Carriages, Cabs, 

'Busses, Baggage and 

Transfer Wagons 

Office, 15 North eascade 



Denver Law School 

Law Department of the 
University of Denver 

Three years' course leading to the degree of 
Bachelor of Laws. Courses in Mining and Irri- 
gation Law. Full resident faculty. For informa- 
tion address 

LUCIUS W. HOYT, Dean 

Ernest & Cranmer BIdg., Denver, Colo. 

Burqess* 
Groceries 



That they are in every way the 
best^ you quickly learn by test 

112 North Tejon St. 

Titsworth & Davidson 
DAIRY 

2 MILES S. E. OF COLORADO SPRINGS. P. 0. BOX 6 

The Houck=DaYidson Coal and Transfer Co. 

Dealers In 

CANON CITY, MAITLAND 

AND LIGNITE COAL 

Phone 473-B. Office US N. Tejon. P. O. Box 275 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 



X See 



^he Gowdy-Simmons Printing Company 

FOR WINDOW CARDS, TICKETS, ETC. ENGRAVED 
CARDS AND INVITATIONS ON SHORT NOTICE 



TJej'on Si* 



X eOTRELL St LEONARD, 

4* ALBANY. N. Y. 

* Makers of CAPS and GOWNS to American Col- 

* leges and Universities from the Atlantic to 
T the Pacific. Bulletin, samples, etc. 

- upon application. 



THE DERN TEA AND COFFEE CO, 

Dealers in TEAS, COFFEES, SPICES, 
EXTRACTS, BAKING POWDERS, Etc. 



Phone 575 



29 S. Tejon St. 



The PeopIe^s Qtoczty and Matket 



PHONE MAIN 868 




♦ S. JAMES & SON, Props, 



222 EAST PIKE'S PEAK 



Colorado Springs, Colorado 



4* 






ST. JOHN & BARNES 

Oldest and largest plumbing and heating 

tstablishment in city. Your 

patronage solicited 



Telephone 13 



206 N. Tejon St. 



Phone Main 151 Established 1897 

p. W. 8MITH 

FAMILY GROCER, TEA AND 
COFFEE MERCHANT . : : : : 
Orders Called for and Promptly Delivered 

731 N. Weber St. Colorado Springs, Colo. 



112 Pike's Peak Ave. 



Telephone 230 



THE COLORADO SPRINGS 
FUEL COMPANY 

H. C. HARMON, Manager. 

Retailers of all the best grades of 

eOAL, eOKB, WOOD and eHAReOAL, 

Exclusive Agency in Colorado Springs for all 
coal mined by the Colorado Fuel & Iron Co. 

The best Colorado Springs Lignite Coal for 
both domestic and steam use furnished promptly. 



For Goodness Sake^^^ 



Use TUDOR lower vein Coal 
It beats all other Lignite 

TUDOR COAL COMPANY, Cor. Cascade and Cucharas 



THE MISSES PICK 

^ressma/cers from the ^asi 

^00 JUS SSaeoTt ^/d^.^ ^O ^t Zee's ^aa/e J^um. T^jtstatr-s 

Students wishing a special course in Drawing, 
Water colors, Oil or China Paintings should call at 
ART STUDIO, 108 N. Tejon. MARION R. FORBISH, 

Member of Art Institute, Chicago. 

The ©Id 
Curio Store 

Wholesale and Retail 
Dealers in 

GENUINE INDIAN GOODS AND 
CURIOSITIES 

J. S. CANDELARIO, Prop., 

301 and 303 San Francisco Street, 

SANTA FE, N. M. 



4* 
4^ 
4* 
4* 

4» 

4* 



DOVGLAS ®L he:the:r.ington 

^rchitecf4^ 

Phone 556-B Rooms 15-16 Outwest Building, Colorado Springs, Colo. 

i»4»4>4>4»4»4»4>4»4>4>4»4*4*4*4*4*4*4*4»4*4»4*4»4*4*4*4*4*4*4*4*4»4*4>4*4>4*4»4»4>4>4*4 



4*4*4>4*4'4*4*4*4*4>4>4*4*4>4>4*4'4»4»4»'i*4»4*<i*4*4»4*ii'€*4'^4>*l*4'4>4»4>*i*4>4>4»«l*4'4>4>4» 

4* The Yoxin^ Men^s Store* 4* 



♦ CLOTHES FOR COLLEGE MEN 



4» 
4> 

Styles that have the "Snap and Go" required by the young fellows ♦ 

"Swell" three button, single-breasted sacks 4* 

Five button, single-breasted sacks and three button double-breasted sacks * 



4* 
4* 
4» 

♦ 
4' 
* 
4> 

* SPECIAL DISCOUNT 

* TO STUDENTS 



$(0.00 to $20.00 « 
HOLBROOK & PERKINS I 



THE DENVER EIRE CLAY CO. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 
AND DEALERS IN 



% Chemical and Physicial Apparatus and Chemicals % 



% 1742-1746 Champa Street, 



A FULL LINE OF LABORATORY SUPPLIES AND ASSAY GOODS 



Write for Illustrated Catalogues 



DENVER, COLORADO 




Excellent ^hoto^frap/is 

at BINGHHM & WCOD'S. 18 S. Tejon 

H. C COLBURN, Pres. E. A. COLBURN, Jr., Sec'y and Treas. 

The ^yjfttler^s ^yixitoinohile Co. 

LIVER. Y, STORAGE, REPAIRING 

Telephone Main 122 8-10 JV, J^e-Oada ^-Ve. Colorado Springs, Colo, 



t- 



sJf. 




O. E. HEMENWAY 

Groceries and Meats 



nS South Tcjon St. 
Colorado Springs, Colorado 




4* 
4* 

4* 
4* 
4* 

♦ 

4» 
♦ 
4* 

♦ 
4> 
4> 
♦ 

4* 

♦ 
4> 

♦ 
4» 
♦ 

♦ 
4* 



^^^^ififif^^^*4f^*4p*^**^*^4p*****^^*^****^**4f*^** 



!«£ TIGER 




VOX.VJVJE VII. 



29, 1904 

JVumber 3. 



* 

4* 

♦ 
4» 
4> 
4* 

4* 
4> 

4* 

♦ 
4* 
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4* 
4> 
* 

4* 

4> 

4* 

4* 
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♦ 
4* 
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4> 

4* 

4* 

4> 

4* 
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♦ 



4*4*4>4>4*4*4>4>4*4*4>4'4*4*4*4>4*4>4>4>4>4> 

Special Rates to Students 

On Rented Pianos 




The KNIGHT -eaMPBELL 
Music Company 



Hew Lennox Block 



Opposite North Park 



St. John Bros-r"'"'™'"' 

Gas and Steam Fitters 

Hot Water Heating a Specialty 

Prompt attention given to Repair Work. 

gurtis goal go. 

Office 132 N. Teion St. Telephone 91. 

Try "NEW RANGE" for the Kitchen, I4.00. 
BiTUMNOUs Coal at Standard Prices. 

SELDOMRIDGE BROTHERS, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

Flour, Feed, Grain, Hay and Seeds 

108 South Tejon Street 

Kepairing while You Wait Satisfaction Guaranteed 

A complete plant of New Machinery for 
the Manufacture of Fine Boots and Shoes 

The Lightning Shoe Shop 

B E O W N & COMPANY 
We make a specialty of Shoes to Measure and Shoes for 
Cripples. 28V^ North Tejon St. Colorado Spbings 

Visiting Cards in Latest Styles. 



WE SHOW 
YOU 



By advertising in THE TiGER that we 
appreciate your custom. 

22 E. Kiowa St. The Prompt Printer j 
The 



Hassell Iron Works Co. 



Founders and Machinists 



4>4»4*'l>4><»4*4*4*4'4'*i>4*<i><l>*l>«4*4»^#4* 



7l/e 2l/elcome 



THE STUDENTS, 

new and old, at our studio, 

Corner Cascade and Kiowa 




7n£at i 



Dealer in Kodaks and Supplies. 



COLLEGE GOWNS, CAPS 

The Best Workmanship 
at Lowest Prices 

Silk Faculty Gowns and Hoods 




COX SONS & VINING 

262 Fourth Avenue., NEW YORK 



F00T BALLS 

Pants, Nose Guards, 
Tennis Goods 
and Sweaters 



at Strangs 

119 Xorth Tejon Street 



Mueth*s 

Soda, Ice (Sream 

eATERING 

CHAS. T. FERTIG 

'Jfea.l Estate, Loans and Insurance 

29 N. Tejon Street 

Z7/te Colorado Springs ^ioral Co* 

FLORISTS 



/O'^ ^oftA Vtt/om Str^»t 



♦ USE ELECTRIC LIGHT 
J IN YOUR HOMES 



The Colorado Springs Electric Co. : 



4»4»4»4>4'4>4*4*4*4i4i4*4*<l»4*4*4*4»4»4»4*4>*ti4»4»4*4*«i*4>4»4*«4'4»4»4*4i4»4»'i*4»4»4>4>«4* 



THB TIGBR. 



Student's Book Store Books stationery; an Engi- 

neer's Supplies; College Pins 



and Watch Fobs, 
and up. 



Century Fountain Pens $1 to $4, Waterman's $2.50 

REYER & PLATT. 



E. R. OURFEE 



The \NTLERS PRESSING and CLEANING CO. n- 5w.stH.erf.». 

Strict Attention, Good Work, Fair Prices, Prompt Delivery. Your orders solicited. Ladies and Gentle- 
men's work carefully done. 1 Also do Tailoring and Alterations. 



THE COLORADO SPRINGS CO. 

The Original Locators of 

Coioracio Spr/n^s and T^an/tou 

is still offering for sale choice 
lots on North Weber Street 
and North Wahsatch Avenue 

Also lots for sale in other parts of Colorado Springs 
and in Manitou 

Apply at ROOMS, OUTWEST BUILDING 

LOUIS STOCK steam D.ye^and Cleaning 

Office and Works, US N. Tejon St. 

TELEPHONE 517-B 

Cleaning, Dyeiug, Scouring in all its branches 

Ostrich Plumes Cleaned, Dyed and Curled 

Kid Gloves Dyed and Cleaned. 

GIDDINGS BROS. 

fine dress goods and ladies' 
tailor suits, ladies' 
^''^ Furnishings 

Kiowa and Tejon Streets. 

CHARLES P. BENNETT 

Real Estate, Loans 
and Insurance^^ ^ 

NO. 5 PIKE'S PEAK AVENUE 

GEO. BRINK CO MPANY 

COFFEE ROASTERS 
Wholesale Teas^ Spices, 
Extracts, Baking Powders 

n E. Kiowa St. Plione Main 779 Colorado Springs 

THE HEFLEY-ARCILARIUS DRUG CO. 

Kodaks, Cameras and all kinds of Photographic 
Supplies. Developing and Printing for Amatuers. 
Free Delivery. 
Phone 144 21 South Tejon Street 



Fine Rooms for College 
Students. 1 16 E. Boulder 

ROOMS for Students of College. 
Strictly Modern, rates reasonable. 

6i6 N. Weber. 

A. G. SPAILDING 
& BROS. 



Athletic Outfitters. 

HENRY TAMR^ 

Druggist 

PRESCRIPTIONS 
TOILET ARTICLES 
STATIONERY 

All Popular Drinks Served 
at our Soda Fountain 

Plaza Hotel, Cor. Cache la Poudre & Tejon Sts. 

THE RUGBY=PRmROSE COAL CO. 

All Kinds of Fuel 

Phone 481-A West 44-A 21 N. TEJON ST. 



H. KFnnz 



H. KRANZ & 



Only 8 Chair Barber Shop in the City 
\ObV2 B. Pike'9 Peak 7\ve. 



BATH TUBS F. R. SMITH 

e©., Barbers 

Try the tiectric Vibrassage Machine 
eGLORADO SPRINGS, eOLO. 



THE TIGBR. 



TRY THE 

NEW eOLLlNS HOTEL 

eripple Creek. Colo. 

Home Dairy Restaurannt in connection 
Popular Prices 



STUDENTS 



Get your KODAK SUP- 



PLIES at GOERKE'S 
Only exclusive Photo Supply store in the city 
Opp. Opera House 21 N. Tejon 

We sell a GOOD FOUNTAIN PEN for $1 

WHITNEY & GRIMWOOD 

Opera House Building 

We are agents for WATERMAN'S IDEAL FOUNTAIN 
PENS. Prices from $2. 50 up. 



^red S. J^aj/ner 

Watchmaker and Jeweler 

15 South Uejon St, 

DENTIST 

IS South Jjejon St. 



G. W. Pauly, B. S., D. O. Mks. Lona E. Pauly, B. S. D. O. 

Graduates of A. T. Still's College of Osteopathy, 

Kirksville,Mo. 

DR. & MRS. PAULY, ?IVs?c"iS?s'" 

Office, rooms 303-301 DeGraff Bldg. 118 N. Tejon St., Colo- 
rado Springs, Colo. Ph. nes-Office i:<edl272; Res. Red323 
Hours 8 to 12 a. m., 1 to 5 p. m. 



C. W. WARSOP & CO.. 



205 N. Tejon 5t. 



Draperies, Upholstery Goods, Furniture. Complete line of Screens, 
Pillows, Pillow Tops, Couch Covers, etc. 



I^ardivarc Bicycles 

a. S. BLHKE 

New Chainless Bicycle $35 and $20 

Rambler, Orient and National Automobiles 

Best Kepair Shop in city 107 n. Ccjoti 

nirs. 1^« K« brooks 

Coilct Parlors at 20 East Hioiva 

Also Room 52, Antlers Hotel 

No Apprentices. Only experienced help employed. 

FRANK F. CRUMP 

FLORIST 

Phone 500 509 E. Columbia St. 

Special attention given to Telephone Orders. 

PARK BAKERY '^^ 

Finest Coffee and Lunch Room in the City 
J. SCHACrER, Prop., Coiorcclo Springs, Colo. 



D, E. MONROE & CO, 
Prescription Drugflist 

The best of Drugs, Stationery and Toilet Articles 

NO LIQUORS SOLD. 
eor. Teioti S( Biiou Pbone 311 S( 331 

For $1.00 Per Month 

/ Suit Sponged and Pressed each %eek 
PANTAIORIUM i7 east bijou 

Branch office opp Plaza Hotel. 

H. E. BOATRIGHT 

u^ublic Stenographer 

33 GIDDINGS BLDG. 
Rates oc per 100 words, 50c per hr. extra carbons 5c per page 

When in doubt , take the safe side. 

SEND BUNDLES TO THE 

Colorado Springs Laundry 



Est. 20 yrs. 



Ralph Rice, College Agt. 



FRANK H. SMALL watches, Diamonds, fine Watch Work. Special 
Jeweler and Silversmith ^^'^^^ to Students. 113 Pike's Peak Ave. 



Z;he TlOCIt 



Vol. VII 



COLORADO COLLEGE, SEPTEMBER 29, 1904. 



No. 3 



Constitfition of the Coloirado College Otaiotical 
and Debating Association. 



ARTICI^E I. 

Section i. This organization shall be known 
as The Colorado College Oratorical and Debat- 
ing Association, and its membership shall consist 
of the students of the College. 

ARTlCIvS II. 

Section i. The object of this Association shall 
be to have charge of and to promote the oratori- 
car and debating interests of the College. 
ARTICI.E) III. 

Section i. The officers of this Association 
shall consist of a President, a Vice-President, and 
a Secretary-Treasurer. 

Sec. 2. The officers of this Association shall 
be elected on the first Friday in October, and 
shall immediately enter upon the duties of their 
respective offices. 

Sec. 3. It shall be the duty of the President 
to preside at all meetings. In case of a tie in 
voting he shall cast the deciding vote. He shall 
call a meeting at the written request of seven 
members, giving at least one day's notice of such 
meeting. 

Sec. 4. In the absence of the President it shall 
be the duty of the Vice-President to preside. 

Sec. 5. It shall be the duty of the Secretary- 
Treasurer to keep an accurate account of each 
meeting; to put on record the names and rank 
of the several orators at each contest; and to 
notify such contestant of the appointment of 
judges. Further, it shall be his duty to take 
charge of all funds of the Association. He shall 
pay bills only when signed by the President, and 
shall present a written report of the financial 
condition of the Association at its annual meet- 
ing. He shall perform such other duties as the 
Association shall authorize. 

Sec. 6. The officers of the Association shall 
constitute the Executive Committee. It shall be 
ihe duty of the Executive Committee to take 
cliarge of all contests of the Association as here- 
inafter provided. 

Sec. 7. No officer of this Association shall be 
eligible to compete in any contest unless he shall 
have resigned his position two weeks before said 
contest. 



ARTICLE IV. 

Section i. The annual oratorical contests of the 
Association shall take place on the Monday of 
Commencement week. 

Sec. 2. Any member of this Association who 
is a regular enrolled student, carrying at least 
ten hours work per week in the Liberal Arts 
Departments of the College, shall have the privi- 
lege of engaging in any local contest. 

Sec. 3. The Executive Committee shall meet 
cne month before an appointed local contest for 
the purpose of selecting three judges. 

Sec. 4. Any judge shall be removed on the 
protest of any contestant, made in writing within 
five days after receiving notice of his appoint- 
ment; provided, no contestant shall be allowed 
more than one protest. 

Sec. 5. The judges shall judge upon the effort 
as a whole, and shall confer with each other be- 
fore giving decision. 

Sec. 6. It shall be the purpose of the Associa- 
tion to hold at least one Inter-Collegiate debate 
each year, and all neccessary arrangements for 
such debates shall be in charge of this Associa- 
tion. 

Sec. 7. It shall be the purpose of this Associa- 
tion to hold local debates from time to time as 
may seem wise. 

Sec. 8. All inter-collegiate debaters shall be 
chosen from members of this Association. 

ARTICLE V. 

Section i. This Association shall offer a prize 
of twenty-five dollars to the winner of the local 
oratorical contest. 

ARTICLE VI. 

Section i. The presence of twelve members 
shall be nec-^ssary to constitute a quorum at any 
meeting of this Association. 

ARTICLE VII. 

Section i. This constitution may be amended 
by a two-thirds vote of those present at any an- 
nual meeting, or at any meeting called for this 
special purpose, and notice of said amendment 
shall be posted on the College bulletin board at 
least one week previous to this meeting. 



THE TIGER. 



Sec. 2. All questions involving parliamentary 
forms not provided for in this Constitution shall 
be referred to Roberts' Rules of Order. 
By-Laws of The Colorado C01.1.EGE Oratorical, 
AND Debating Association. 

Law I. In the contests of the Association no 
oration shall contain more than two thousand 
words. 

Law 2. All expenses shall be provided by the 
Association, 

Law 3. These By-Laws may be amended by 
a two-thirds vote at any meeting. 

It seemed best to the Executive Committee 
that the following changes should be made in the 
Constitution in order to make it up to date : 

Article III, Section 7. Be stricken out entirely. 

Article IV, Section i. The annual oratorical 
contests of this Association shall take place at 
such time and place as the society, by a tvvo- 
thirds vote of those present at any meeting, shall 
decide upon. 

Sec. 2. After "Arts" and before "Departments," 
to insert "or Engineering." 

Sec. 5. That beginning with "and" shall be 
stricken out entirely. 

Article V, Section i. This Association shall 
offer prizes for the first two positions in the pre- 
liminaries for the state oratorical contests as the 
Association shall decide. 

There will be a meeting Thursday, October 6, 
after Chapel, to vote upon these amendments, 
and it is urged that as many as possible be pres- 
ent at that meeting. The question for the Inter- 
state Debate will probably be here in a week 
or ten days, when the Association will choose 
sides and work can commence at once. Those 
\\ho are thinking of entering the debate should 
remember that two hours credit is given to 
those who make the team, and an hour's 
credit to the winners of the first two places in 
the oratorical contest. Both contests are to be 
held here this year, and it is our duty to win 
til em. 



MR. MAHAFFY'S SPEECH. 

Mr. Mahaffey's speech on the American Uni- 
versity system, was rather a severe criticism 
of that institution. It illustrated the "old school" 
idea of education. He said in part : 

The greatest fault of the American University 
courses is their lack of uniformity and definite- 
ness. This is due partly to the growing tendency 
of doing away with matriculation examinations, 
but vastly more to the modern elective system. 
Such a system is unwise in that it leaves entirely 
to the discretion of the student, who is not the 



best judge of his needs, what studies shall be 
pursued. It is the well trained professor who 
knows what subjects are best for the young 
man's wants. Moreover, the elective system is 
not advisable in that plans for the future must, 
in the majority of cases, be entirely changed, and 
with them the subjects studied. So it is better 
to master thoroughly a few subjects, which will 
last a life time, and which will be a basis for any 
further education. Besides, no education is val- 
uable unless each one of you is compelled to do 
things that he does not like. 

University courses should be made up of Eng- 
lish Composition, Greek, Latin, Mathematics and 
Logic. It is necessary that everyone be acquaint- 
ed with the principles of English composition. 
But the courses of today in English literature are 
one of the most mischievous inventions of mod- 
ern times. They falsify completely the position 
that English literature ought to hold in the 
world. Greek and Latin must also form a large 
part of our education, since a thorough mastery 
of these subjects is the greatest achievement of 
any education. Mathematics and Logic form the 
only basis for correct reasoning, and therefore 
their study should be begun at an early age and 
continued through college. 

The so-called modern improvements of edu- 
cction have not essentially bettered things. 

The culture of • an old fashioned university 
course can not be obtained in a democracy where 
the masses and not the few are able to attend. 
To gain the culture of such a course required 
years of study and leisure, and so was confined 
necessarily to the aristocracy. 

The end of all education is character. With 
any other object in view, education is a failure. 
(Omitted last week by mistake.) 



To THE Editor oe The Tiger. 

Dear Sir: On looking over the statement of 
the condition of the Athletic Association, pub- 
lished in the first issue of the TiGER, one sees 
that it is absolutely necessary to place the Asso- 
ciation on a firmer financial basis. 

Furthermore, the only plausible method of do- 
ing this is that of increasing the present athletic 
fund from $3.00 to $5.00. Already there has been 
some discsusion as to whether this is advisable 
or not. There are a number of simple reasons 
to show that it is. 

The first is that if the financial credit of the 
Association is to be maintained, more funds will 
liave to be forthcoming to meet the expenses. 
Already some business firms in both Colorado 
Springs and Denver are beginning to be a little 
backward in letting the Athletic Association of 
Colorado College incur bills of any large amount. 
This fact shows as plainly as figures that our 



THE TIGBR 



credit is , becoming untrustworthy in the eyes of 
business men. If the present state of affairs con- 
tinues for any length of time, financial ruin will 
be the inevitable result. 

Moreover, the Athletic Association can not look 
to business men for the same donations and help 
that their generosity in former years has seen fit 
to bestow. To go down town and raise one or 
two hundred dollars by subscription today is a 
much more difficult task than it has been in 
former years. However, it is not just to expect 
the athletics to be maintained entirely by out- 
siders. It is the students themselves who derive 
the greatest benefit, and therefore it is from 
them that the greatest part of the financial sup- 
port can be rightly expected. 

All large institutions of the counry, unless 
their athletics are endowed, charge as high a fee 
as $5.00. It is true that at many of the large 
state institutions and rich universities — notably 
Cornell — a charge of ten dollars admits a stu- 
dent to all games, as well as pays his fee. But 
Colorado College does not afford a parallel ex- 
ample. Here the athletics are not richly endowed, 
and necessarily they must be supported by the 
students. 

If something is not done to better our condi- 
tion, one of two things must result. Either 
Colorado College will have to give up its present 
high standard that it holds in football and base- 
ball and cease to compete for the championships ; 
or, ..else, our credit will eventually be ruined, if 
we keep on trying to put out well-coached cham- 
pionship teams. Respectfully, 

Bert Wasley. 

WiEE G. Johnston. 

L. S. BaeE. 



CALENDAR. 



12:45 P. M.- 

4:00 P.M.- 
4:30 P. M.- 

5 :oo P. M.- 
7:00 P. M.- 
7:30 P.M.- 
7 :30 P. M.- 

3 :oo P. M.- 



4 :oo P. M. 
6:45 P.M. 



FRIDAY, SEPT. 30. 

—Election of two members of the 

Athletic Board. 
-Minerva, Apollonian Club House. 
-Hypatia, Room 12, Perkins (closed 

meeting). 
-Contemporary, Ticknor Study. 
-Y. W. C. A., Ticknor Study. 
-Apollonian, Club House. 
-Pearsons, Cutler Academy. 

SATURDAY, OCT. I. 

■Tigers vs. Centennial (Pueblo) H. 
S., Washburn Field. Admission, 
25 cents. 

SUNDAY, OCT. 2. 

-Y. M. C. A., Cutler Academy. 

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 5. 

-Y. M. C. A., Hagerman Hall. 



"THE KNOCKER." 

About the least consistent man ' 

I know uv, near cr far, 
'S the one thet's allu/. knuckin' 'round 

'Cuz things is ez they are. 

The Farmer'll knock becuz it rains 
Too hard ; an' when it stops 

He'll knock agin, fer all he's worth, 
About the dried-up crops. 

Some Mothers, 'stead uv keepin' house, 

In clubs of knockers meets 
Tew chaw the rag 'bout raisin' kids, 

While theirs runs in the streets ! 

The Workin' man will knock becuz 
The rich man's wealth hez grown ; 

An' yet he's workin', tooth and nail, 
Tew git some uv his own ! 

The Vegetar'an man knocks hard 
'Cuz other folks "slays" meat ; 

An' then go kill "pore, suff'rin' cows" 
Tew make shoes fer his feet ! 

I reckon most of uv us wud knock 

In ruther milder tones, 
Ef we shud clean our own faults out, 

Before a-slingin' stones. 

— IVm. Men-ell Vories, '04 

. Architect — Where would you prefer the draw- 
ing room, sir? 

Mr. Yellowdust (fresh from Klondike) — Look 
here, young man, I've let you put in a smokin' 
room when I don't smoke, a music room when 
I couldn't play a mouth-organ, an' a nursery 
when I ain't got no nurse, but I'm going to pull 
up at a drawin' room when I couldn't even draw 
-1 straight line ! — Tit Bits. 



ADVERTISERS PLEASE NOTICE 

We don't want to buy your dry goods, 
We don't like you any more. 

You'll be sorry when you see us 
Going to some other store. 

You can't sell us any collars. 
Four-in-hands, or any fad. 

We don't want to trade in your store 
If you don't give us your ad. 



She gave me the turn-down yesterday ; 

Did I wail, and weep, and holler? 
Well, no; for she was clerking and 

I asked for that kind of a collar. 



The tiger. 



THE TIGER. 

Published weekly during the College year by 
ThjE Tiger Publishing Co., in the interest of Colo- 
rado College. 

J. Y. Crothers Editor-in-Chief 

T. Hunter Assistant Editor-in-Chief 

J. I. Muffley Athletic Editor 

Miriam Carpenter Literary Editor 

Mabel Barbee Alumni Editor 

A. H. Fisher Local Editor 

Bert Wasley Business Manager 

C. A. Hedblom .... Assistant Business Manager 

CORRESPONDENTS: 

Mr. Nash, Miss McDowell, Miss Isham, Miss 
Kidder, Mr. Lamb, Mr. Reeks, Miss Arbuckle. 

Subscription, $1.25 per year, payable in advance. 
Single copy, 5 cents. 

The Tiger is forwarded to all subscribers until 
ordered discontinued and all arrearanges are paid. 

Students, Professors and Alumni are invited 
to contribute literary articles, personals and items. 
Contributions must be accompanied by the writer's 
name. 

Address all communications to The Tiger, 
Colorado College, Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Entered at the Postoffice at Colorado Springs, 
Colo., as second-class matter. 



Patronize Tiger Advertisers 



EDITORIAL 

AS OTHERS SEE US. 

A GREAT deal of criticism has been passed on 
the students of Colorado College within the 
past week, and not without some justice. Un- 
fortunately, the people at large are only too apt 
to seize on the worst reports that get into the 
daily papers and base their judgments upon them. 
They never think of inquiring into the truth of 
these reports. As a matter of fact the truth it- 
self in the present case is not the most pleasant 
subject of contemplation. Class scraps are doubt- 
less a good thing in the proper place, but that 
place is not at a private residence, where prop- 
erty is almost invariably injured, and the peace 
of the occupants is disturbed. In some of the 
larger universities the boys of the two lower 
classes get together the first of the year and 
settle finally the question of supremacy. Sev- 
eral years ago the College tried this plan, but 
some of the contests were so ridiculous that the 
plan fell into disuse. The matter of letting the 
superfluous energy of the under classmen blow 



off through a safety valve instead of allowing 
it to burst the boiler, is to be taken up shortly. 
The results will be awaited with interest, espe- 
cially by those interested in the welfare of the 
College. When the fellows come to appreciate 
fully the burdens they are adding to shoulders 
already heavily laden with troubles, they will be 
ii:ore careful of their actions. There will be 
hard fought contests in the future, but the blows 
will fall on those who are not in a position to 
object. 



THE PIKE'S PEAK NUGGET. 

A CCORDING to the hand-book, the Nugget 
of the Class of 1906 is to appear on the 
first day of May. As a matter of fact, the Nugget 
never has appeared on the scheduled day, causing 
a great deal of knocking on the part of some 
students. Although the Nugget Board may to 
a certain extent be responsible for the delay, the 
students themselves are more to blame. They 
do not get their material in to the Board. Now 
is the time to commence to write your stories 
and poems, and to collect your jokes. The 
prizes offered by the Board are well worth 
striving for. The Nugget this year will without 
doubt surpass all others in its photography, which 
adds so much to a publication of this kind. 
Whether its drawings and literary matter shall 
be of the same degree of excellence, lies with 
the students. The Nugget Board is already 
iiard at work, but will be glad to spare a few- 
minutes to explain to students anything they 
may wish to know concerning competition for 
prizes. 



COLLEGE SPIRIT. 

r\ ID you notice the splendid display of enthu- 
siasm displayed last Saturday afternoon on 
Washburn Field? If not, you missed something 
long to be remembered. The rooting was enough 
to make one wish that for the time he had been 
stone deaf. The number of Faculty and stu- 
dents out to see the game was very encouraging 
to the Athletic Association. If the attendance 
should increase much more several new grand- 
stands would have to be built, which would en- 
tail an expense on the aforesaid Association 
which is carefully to be avoided. If there are any 
new students who do not know all the College 
yells and songs it is because they were not at 
Saturday's game, for all of them were given, 
cither by College or High School. It is but one 
month till the most important game of the sea- 
son. If we are to win, the students will have 
to support the team more heartily than they did 
last Saturday. You will have another chance 



THE TIGER 



next Saturday to show your loyalty, when comes 
the game with the Centennial High School of 
Pueblo. Everybody come. 



'TO prevent any slight unpleasantness, the edi- 
tors of The Tigkr would suggest to new 
students that it would be well to inform them- 



selves as to who is on the Tiger Board before 
criticising it freely in public. The Board has huge 
ambitions and is reluctant to thing that The 
Tiger this year will be either "cheap" or "third- 
rate." It is the desire of the Board that anyone 
thus pessimistically inclined would contribute 
freely in order that the standard may be raised. 




»i»5»i»i»i»s»5»i»i»b»ir)C^ 



ATHLETIC 
DEPARTMENT 



High School Dirttbbed by the Tigers. 



The High School team lined up against the 
Tigers Saturday for the regular annual game. A 
good-sized crowd of supporters of both teams 
was there to witness what was supposed to be an 
even game, but during the first half when the 
College regulars were in, the boys whom Coach 
Richards teaches did not have a chance, but in 
the second half when the College team was com- 
posed of substitutes the Terrors had somewhat 
the best of it. 

There were many glaring defects in the play 
of both teams, but as it is still early they can 
easily be remedied. Both teams fumble fre- 
quently, but the Terrors fumbled more consist- 
ently. The College backs ran too high, and the 
line was rather slow at charging, but on the whole 
the team showed up well.. There was an ag- 
gressiveness and gameness which pleases us all, 
for it means that the Tigers of 1904 will be hard 
to beat. 

The High School was confident that the Col- 
lege could not score two touchdowns, but were 
surprised, for if the first team had been kept 
ir. the score would have been very large. But 
Coach Juneau gave nearly everybody a chance 
and now knows what each fellow can do. 

Lennox and Fisher on the ends, Randolph at 
quarter, and Hill, Morgan, Mack and Vandemoer 
did some good work. 

High School chose the south goal, and Nead 
kicked off to Lockhart, on the ten-yard line, 
who returned the ball ten yards. McCune made 
a yard through tackle, and Lockhart hit guard 
for no gain. McCune's kick was blocked, Mor- 
gan falling on the ball. Morgan went through 
tackle for three yards, but on the next play the 



ball was fumbled. Vandemoer dropped back 
for a punt, but fumbled the pass and it was 
High School's ball on the College 40-yard line. 
McCune tried right end for no gain. Randolph 
on a quarter-back run made two and one-half 
yards for the Terrors. McCune punted, but 
Shorty "hobbled," and it was the Terrors' ball 
on the College 20-yard line. W. Randolph tried 
a quarterback run, but Vandemoer caught him 
for two and one-half yards loss a la Rice at 
Boulder. Lockhart couldn't gain, and McCune 
fumbled, Morgan falling on the ball. Then came 
the march to the goal. HiH hit tackle for two 
^ards, and Morgan made two more and slid 
through guard for three. On the next play 
Morgan skirted left end for twenty yards, and 
Hill went through tackle for three yards. Hill 
liit center for three and Mack found the same 
place for two more, which put the ball on the 
2-yard line. Hill was pushed over for a touch- 
down. Lennox kicked a neat goal. Score, 6-0. 

Nead kicked to Perkins, who brought the oval 
back 15 yards. Lockhart made three yards 
around right end, and Perkins failed to gain at 
center. It was College's ball. On the first play 
Morgan got through tackle for ten yards, and 
PI ill made three through guard and two around 
right end. Morgan made five through guard. 
Mack made three yards through tackle. Hill 
hit tackle for three yards, and Morgan made the 
touchdown through the same hole. Lennox 
kicked a difficult goal. Score, 12-0. 

Nead kicked off to Lockhart, who fumbled 
but recovered the ball and made five yards be- 
fore Lennox tackled him. The College was play- 
ing fierce ball, and on the next play Lockhart 
lest two and one-half yards, and time was up. 



8 



THE TIGBR 



When they lined up for the second half there 
were six substitutes on the College team. Mc- 
Cune kicked off to Morgan, who returned the 
ball twenty-five yards. Fisk made two yards 
and Morgan three. Then Mack plunged through 
center for four yards. Morgan lost two yards 
in trying to skirt left end, but Fisk made four 
through tackle. Mack made five and one-half 
yards and Morgan three. Faucett had his shoul- 
der knocked down, and Willis went in at guard. 
The Terrors braced up and in the middle of the 
field held the Tigers for downs. Lockhart made 
three yards, and on a fake kick McCune got around 
right end for thirty-five yards. Here the Tigers 
held for downs, and on the first play Johnston 
skirted left end for forty yards, but had to bring 
the ball back for holding. Billy tried again and 
made nine yards, but Fisk and Morgan could not 
make the necessary distance, so Vandemoer 
dropped back for a punt. The pass was very 
bad, and it was the Terrors' ball on the 25-yard 
line. Lockhart made one yard and McCune lost 
three, and time was up. 

Final score, 12-0. 



High School. 

Morrison 

Jones 

Shaw 



LINJi UP. 

Tigers. 

. Lv. E Fisher- Willett 

. . . L. T Vandemoer 

. . L. G Faucett- Willis 



Draper C Bale-Mosteller 

Roe R. G Hedblom 

Hackett R. T Nead-Howbert 

Randolph Q. B. . . Randolph-Johnston 

McCune L. H. B Hill-Fisk 

Lockhart R. H. B Morgan 

Perkins F. B Mack 

Umpire, Frost. Referee, Dubach. Timekeep- 
ers, Armstrong and Hester. Halves, 15 minutes 
each. 



ATHLETIC BOARD. 

Two student members of the Athletic Board 
are to be elected at a meeting of the students after 
Chapel September 30. 



TIGER NOTES. 

Hypatia entertained the new girls at an 
"Autumn Spread" Wednesday night in Ticknor 
Study. 

Freshman Girl (to upper classman quoting 
Chaucer)— Well, you have a mighty bad case of 
put-on. 

Miss Burns and Miss Metcalf are new residents 
of Montgomery. 



The Sophomore girls in Montgomery gave a 
fudge party Friday night. 

Miss Marie Roberts entertained the "Celes- 
tials" at a fudge party Friday night. 

The Freshman girls enjoyed Saturday even- 
ing with the Contemporary Club. 

Wanted — Four dumb waiters. Apply at the 
Phoedus Club. 

A number of Freshman girls went to the 
canon last Friday. 

The Freshmen lived through their first Quad- 
ratic exam. 

The Christian Endeavor Society of the First 
Presbyterian church will give a social in honor 
of the College students Thursday at the church 
parlors. 

The Rev. Mr. Ormes is to be "the > man behind" 
the desk at the Library during the present year. 

Mr. M. G. Wyer is at present Librarian for the 
University of Iowa. 

English S enjoyed a cut Monday afternoon. 
They liked it better because they thought it a 
stolen sweet. 

A Correction. — The Tiger is not in a position 
to confer titles. Mr. Henry A. Ruger is not a 
Doctor of Philosophy yet. 

By common agreement of the girls' literary 
societies, no new upper classmen will be ad- 
mitted until the first Friday in October. And 
no Freshmen will be admitted or pledged until 
the first Friday in December. 

Lost. — Monday morning, somewhere off the 
campus, one Librarian. Reward offered for re- 
turn of same to Librarian's desk. 

Arrangements are being made for the fall 
tennis tournament, and it is hoped that a large 
number of entries both among the young men 
and young women in the College will be pro- 
cured. There will be a generous number of 
prizes this year, and enough for all concerned. 
These prizes have been donated by the business 
men, and it is hoped that the entries will reward 
their kindness. There will be first and second 
prizes for men's singles ; first and second prizes 
for ladies' singles ; first prize in men's doubles 
and first prize in mixed doubles. No admission 
fee other than the regular dues will be required. 



Thb tiger 



Miss Loomis gave a very beneficial and en- 
tertaining talk to Hypatia last Friday. 

Those desiring to try for the Glee Club will 
watch the bulletin board for a notice of trial of 



Soph to Freshie — Say, have you got my hat? 

I guess it cost the Freshies something for 
their fun (?). 

Fisher is taking his vacation eariy. 



Any of the fellows who have ability in the 
bowling line are asked to do their best in the 
support of the team. 

A few gentle class scraps just to pass the time 
away. 

The Freshmen did not have a party on Satur- 
day night. Ask the Sophs. 

Don't forget that there is a football game 
Saturday. This means you. 

Faucett had has shoulder displaced in Satur- 
day's game, but "he really didn't notice it at all." 

Those people who persist in leaving their 
wheels in front of the Library will soon hear 
from it, for Prexy is back. 

The boys in Hagerman were pleasantly enter- 
tained by Mr. and Mrs. Ruger in the reading 
rooms on Monday night. Games and music fur- 
nished the evening's amusements. 

Shaw's voice was heard at the game Satur- 
day. 

Miss Phoebe Ward had a visit from her moth- 
er last week. 

Miss Miriam Carpenter and Miss Dorothea 
Beach were guests of Prof, and Mrs. Gile for 
dinner Sunday. 

Last Sunday Miss Jessie Smith was pleasantly 
surprised by a visit from her father. 

Miss Enid Jones, ex-'o6, is enrolled in the 
Conservatory this year. 

Miss McNeen's father visited her Sunday. 

Mrs. Slocum's talk to the Y. W. C. A. Friday 
night was very interesting and most helpful. 

At a meeting of the Campus Association the 
following officers were elected : President, Miss 
Smedley; Vice-President, Miss Ragan ; Secre- 
tary and Treasurer, Miss Cowing. 

Strieby in Chem. B — And there were several 
people killed — 



How long has it been since Howbert visited 
a hen coop? 

Who are the students going to support this 
year, the football team, or the theaters? 

Prexy has been a shining star at St. Louis 
for the week past. 

The Freshies got down on their faces in the 
dirt, and showed proper humbleness in the pres- 
ence of their superior classmen last Wednes- 
day night, the 22nd. 

The Soph girls at Montgomery Hall were treat- 
ed to "Dutch Beds" the night of the party. Who 
did it? 

The Seniors have elected the following officers : 
Maurice Hall, President; Clara Cowing, Vice- 
President ; Mary Porter, Secretary-Treasurer. 



ALUMNI NOTES. 

Lucile Allerdice, '04, is teaching in the Minne- 
qua School, Pueblo. 

Florence Leidigh, '01, is expected in Colorado 
Springs in the near future. 

Watson McHendrie, '00, is one of the condi- 
dates for district attorney in Trinidad. 

Louis Gillette, '01, will soon leave for Mex- 
ico, where he is going as engineer for a mining 
company in which Dr. Cragin is interested. 

Friends of William Warner, '02, will be grieved 
to hear of the death of his father about two 
weeks ago. 

Mabel Jenks, '04, will attend Radcliffe this 
year. 

Mary Strachan, ex-'o5, left last Monday for 
Massachusetts, where she will continue her 
studies in Wellesley College. 

Florence Isham, '01, and ' Judson Cross, '01, 
were married Sept. 13th in New Haven, Conn. 
They will make their home in Ivernbull, Conn., 
where Mr. Cross is pastor of the First Congre- 
gational church. 



td 



THE flCUR. 



B. L. Rice, 'oi, will enter the Tennessee Theo- Marie Gashwiler, '02, has just returned from 

logical Seminary this fall. Columbia, where she spent the summer in study. 



4^#«^<<«^«^##tf^^«<tf^#4^i?^ 



SOCIETIES AND ASSOCIATIONS 



APOLLONIAN. 



CONTEMPORARY CLUB. 



Program, Sept. 30: 
Paper^ — "History of Economic Conditions 

Leading up to the Cripple Creek Strike" . .Nead 
Speech — "Constitutional Questions Involved 

in the Governor's Policy" Hunter 

Banjo Solo Piatt 

Speech — "Was the Governor Justified in 

Calling out the Militia ?" Lake 

Debate — "Resolved, That the mine owners 

were more at fault than the union miners 

in Colorado's recent labor troubles." 

Affirmative McClintock, Randolph 

Negative Tucker, Wasley 



MINERVA. 



The Predecessors of Shakespeare — 

"Influence of the Classics" Miss Palmer 

"Marlowe and His Work" Miss Cheley 

"Recent Presentations of Pre- Shakespearean 

Plays" Miss Ingersoll 

Readings from "Ralph Roister Doister" . . . 

Miss Armstrong 



PEARSONS. 



Program, Sept. 30 : 

Book Review Crothers 

Music Orchestra 

Debate — "Resolved, That in their geenral 
tendencies labor unions in the United 
States are detrimental to the public wel- 
fare." 

Affirmative Scibird, Mack 

Negative Bennett, C. Hall 

Extemporaneous Speeches 

Bale, Boatright, Wallrich 

Persian Serenade Vocal Quartet 

Boomerang Debate Hedblom 

Roll Call answered by quotations from Bill Nye 
Visitors welcome. 



The program for Friday, Sept. 30, will be as 
follows : 

"Feudal System of Japan" Miss Porter 

"Japanese Folk Lore" Miss Rudd 

All guests are welcome. 



CONTEMPORARY RECEPTION. 

Saturday evening the new girls were enter- 
tained by the Contemporary Club in Ticknor 
Study, which was attractively decorated with 
red pillows and navajos. A short pantomime, 
"The Bachelor's Dream," was presented, during 
which Miss Dudley sang "Dreaming, Dream- 
ing," from "The Serenade." The lights were 
turned low and through a red netting was seen a 
bachelor asleep in his easy chair, while all his 
p?st loves appeared before him. 

Ice cream was served in Contemporary colors, 
and the girls danced informally for the rest of 
the evening. A slight diversion was caused by 
the entrance of some uninvited guests, appropri- 
ately clad, however, in red dominoes. Having 
braved the dangers, they eagerly partook of the 
refreshment offered them and seemed reluctant 
to leave. 



HYPATIA. 
The meeting on Sept. 30 will be closed. 



Y. W. C. A. 



Mrs. Slocum gave an interesting talk on her 
visit to the Silver Bay Conference at Lake 
George. 

The conference was attended by the City, Col- 
lege and Boarding School Associations. 

The hours of the day were divided into mission 
study meetings, Bible study meetings, and student 
meetings ; in the evening an address was deliv- 
ered by some well known minister or church 
worker. 

The conference is undenominational and was 
attended by representatives of all sects who were 
interested in the work. . 



ThB fiGHR. 



it 



Many ladies, not connected with any Associa- 
tion work, but wishing to come in closer touch 
with the girls, attended the convention and by 
their enthusiastic co-operation', in all matters! 
added much to the success of the conference. 



Y. M. C. A. 
The Y. M. C. A. held a profitable meeting last 



Wednesday evening. The subject was "Honesty 
in the Class Room." Mr. Tucker presided. 

Sunday's meeting was given over to the cause 
of missions and mission study during the ensu- 
ing year. Mr. Seabigh, of Yale, who was en 
route to establish a college in central China, was 
the speaker of the afternoon. Mr. Seabigh gave 
a strong address, bringing forward the more 
practical side of Christianity, comparing it with 
several heathen religions. Mr. Willis presided. 



ACADEMY DEPARTMENT 



EARLE S. ALDEN, Editor. 



HESPERIAN. 



INITIATION. 



Mr. Brehaut gave an interesting talk before 
the Society on the Olympic Games, speaking in 
detail of the feats of the Greek athletes and the 
attitude of the Greeks toward physical training. 
The society thoroughly enjoyed his address and 
is very grateful for an occasional treat like this 
from a member of the Faculty. 

Richardson read a well-written essay on "Old 
and New Japan," a happily chosen subject in 
view of the great conflict in which that nation 
is now engaged. Richardson has much need of 
self-assurance and easy bearing on the platform, 
and his lack of this was perhaps the only un- 
favorable criticism that could be offered. 

Walter's speech on current events closed the 
program. It is very gratifying to note the im- 
provement in Walter's manner on the stage and 
the apparent ease with which his thought comes 
when he is speaking before the society. While 
he still has room for improvement along these 
lines, most of the society is lacking in this re- 
spect, and constant practice in speaking without 
manuscript will overcome the fault. 

At the business meeting which followed, the 
following new members were elected to the so- 
ciety : Maguire, Mitchell, Jackson, Hoover and 
Johnson. The names of several other candidates 
were laid upon the table for two weeks before 
action should be taken. 

The society is always glad to welconje visitors 
and would be pleased to have every fellow in the 
Academy drop into the Friday evening meetings 
as often as he finds the time to do so. Espe- 
cially are those invited to attend the meetings 
who are interested in literary society work and 
who anticipate joining our society. 

The program for next Friday evening is posted 
in the bulletin board in Cutler Academy. The 
meeting will be called to order at 8 o'clock. 



The Sigma Fraternity of Cutler Academy held 
its first initiation of this year at the home of one 
of its members. Four fine fellows were pulled 
through the thirty rings. The climax of the 
horseplay was reached when the Contemporary 
girls were visited. 

A supper was served after the initiation, and 
on Sunday afternoon the fraternity and its 
friends enjoyed an automobile trip through the 
Garden of the Gods to Manitou and the canons. 



ACADEMY FOOTBALL. 

When Managers Bernard for Cutler and Ross 
for C. S. H. S. went to Denver Saturday morn- 
ing they did not think that they would j^e mas- 
ters of the situation, but when the council met 
and all new memebrs were admitted they found 
tljat things were indeed "coming their way." 
There were six southern, representatives and ffive 
northern, but Boulder Prep, to avoid being ex- 
cluded from the council, was forced to vote 
v.ith them on all important measures. The 
number of championship games necessary now 
are two games between each of the teams in the 
circuit instead of one as formerly. The circuit 
was divided so that the southern circuit embraces 
C. S. H. S., Cutler, Centennial H. S., Central 
H. S. at Pueblo, and Cripple Creek and Victor 
High Schools ; and the northern, Boulder Prep 
and the four Denver schools. The champions 
of each division are to play on Thanksgiving 
day for the championship of the state. 

The schedule for Cutler is : 

Oct. 15— ^Centennial at Pueblo. 

Oct. 22 — Cripple Creek at Cripple Creek (not 
certain). 

Nov. 5 — Central at Pueblo. 

Nov. 8— C. S. H. S. at home. 

Nov. 12 — Centennial here. 

Nov. 9 — Central here. 



t^ 



The Tigur 



The games with Cripple Creek and Victor are 
not definitely arranged, however, but one game 
each will prabobly be played instead of two 
games as with all the others. The subject of 
standing of players in their courses was brought 
up, but nothing was done concerning it. 

The team is coming ahead slowly, but not near- 
ly all the fellows who could be out are coming- 
out. Every fellow who is able should feel it his 
duty to be out and help the team, if he cannot 
play on it. New fellows are coming out every 
night, but more could come, and they should do 
so. The game Saturday plainly illustrates that 
we need much practice, such as two full teams 
could get. Let us see them out ! 



ACADEMY NOTES. 

It is all the style to have your father visit 
you. 

Bernard went to Denver Saturday to attend 
the meeting of the State Athletic Council, com- 
posed of delegates from the councils of the vari- 
ous preparatory schools in Colorado. The results 
of the meeting appear in another column. 

Tuttle has sworn off sending telegrams. 

The following members were elected to the 
Athletic Council from their respective classes : 
Conklin, '05 ; Jackson, '06 ; Campbell, '07 ; Lin- 
coln, '08. The Alumni members elected were 
McCreery and James, while Prof. Gile and Mr. 
Fitch will be the Faculty representatives. 



Considerable joy has been experienced during 
the week by the charter members of the Sigma 
incident to the initiation into their order of four 
men, viz : Allebrand, Hoffman, Graham and Bu- 
chanan. 

Richardson's father and mother, who have 
been visiting him, have returned to New York. 



CONTEMPORARY CLUB. 

The program for Friday, Sept. 30, will be as 
follows : 

"Feudal System of Japan" Miss Porter 

"Japanese Folk Lore" Miss Rudd 

All guests are welcome. 



EXCHANGES- 
REVISED PROVERBS. 

It is never too late to spend. 

Money makes the mayor go. 

A slippered foot gathers no tacks. 

You can drive a man to drink, but you can't 
make him pay. 

It's a long course that has no lectures. 

A subscriber and his money are hard to part. — 
Columbia Jester, 

"Romeo! Romeo!" sobbed the swarthy Juliet. 
"They will notta letta us love-a ana more. My 
people tella me I mus' notta marry you." 

"What I care?" replied Romeo, savagely. 'T 
will t'rowa deesa bomb on da fron' porch. I will 
blowa youra people all over deesa ward." — New- 
ark News.' 



The different classes have elected the follow- 
ing officers for the year: 

Fourth Class — Alden, President; Miss Bernard, 
Vice-President; Miss McCreery, Secretary-Treas- 
urer. 

Third Class — Allebrand, President; Miss Gile, 
Vice-President; Miss Churchill, Secretary-Treas- 
urer. 

Second Class — Gregg, President ; Willfley, Vice- 
President; Buchanan, Secretary-Treasurer. 

First Class — Lincoln, President; Miss Parsons, 
Vice-President ; Haight, Secretary-Treasurer. 



He (on porch) — If I should attempt to kiss 
you would you call for help? 

She (Miss A.) — Would you need any? 

The constant drop of water wears away the hard- 
est stone, 

The constant gnaw of Towser masticates the 
toughest bone. 

The constant wooing lover always carries off the 
maid, 

And the constant advertiser is the one who gets 
the trade. 



Espy, ex-'o6, will be at Lawrenceville Acad- 
emy this year. Hemming, ex-'o4, will be at 
Phillips. 



Maguire, Johnson and 
enne Mountain Saturday. 



Jones climbed Chey- 



"Bill" Moses was a visitor in town over Sun- 
day. He attended the initiation mysteries. He 
will probably return to school later on. 



Teacher (in geography) — There are so many 
people in China that every time you breath some- 
one dies. (To small boy, puffing vigorously) 
Johnny, what are you puffing so for? 

Johnny — I'm killing Chinamen. 



Students, if in need of glasses or repairs on 
same, see Ashby, the Optical Jeweler, the oldest 
established in the county. You will find every- 
thing right. 



THE TIGER. 



IS 




THE eRESeENT HLLEYS MclNTIRE & JENNINGS 113-117 N. Cascade 



next 



You are next to a good hair cut or shave when you patronize 



The Manhattan Barber Shop, J. R. WEYMAR, Prop. 3oe. bijou 



WHITAKER & GARDNER 

30 N. TEJON ST. 

Headqtiafters for 

e olleqe Shoes 

OF EVERY DESCRIPTION 

We have the best mining and civil engineering boot 
in the market 

WHITAKER & GARDNER 




gjAUNDyy 



THE STAR is the leader for prompt 
and satisfactory service. 

SPECIAL RATES to students of col- 
lege and academy 

S. E. BENNETT, College Ag't, 



SEE OUR 
WINDOW 



College Pillow Tops 

7 Views. Best Souvenir or Gift Yet 

Ashford & Roberts 

126 N. Tejon St. 

15 per cent discount to students on framing 



w. I. Lceas 



Columbia, Hartford, Rambler, Ideal & Tribune Bicycles 

The only first-class re air shop in town. Chainless wheels 
a specialty. Wheels for rent. Phone 517- \. I29N. Tejon 

m. eniis Brothers 

THE LITTLE STORE WITH BIG BUSINESS 

Cigars, Tobacco and Periodicals === Cripple Creek 



Every Stxidleiit 

Buy Shoes where the Style and 

PRICES ARE RIGHT 






S ENTITLED to a Special Discount on the best Shoes made at 
118 South Tejon Street R. A. HANDY SHOE CO. 



^4 



THE TIGER 





i 






Colorado College 






THE OLDEST INSTITUTION FOR 






HIGHER EDUCATION IN THE WEST 

> 




FOUNDED AT COLORADO 




SPRINGS IN J874 






Colorado College now offers advantages of the same 






grade as the best institutions. 






For information concerning Courses of Study, Rooms 






and Board, Physical Culture, etc., apply to 






WM. F. SLOCUM, President, 






or EDWARD S. PARSONS, Dean. 






For information in regard to the College Department of 






Music, inquire of ' 




\ 


EDWARD S. PARSONS, Dean. 






Those wishing information as to the Courses in Drawing, 






Painting, Designing, etc., etc., inquire of 






EDWARD S. PARSONS, Dean. 






For information concerning the Engineering Depart- 






ment, apply to 






FLORIAN CAJORI, 






Dean of Engineering School. 




Cutler Academy 


Cutler Academy is the Associated Prepartory School of 




Colorado College, in which students are prepared for any 






American College. Address, 






M. C. GILE, Principal. 





THE TIGER 



15 



The Albert Sechrist Manufacturing Co. 

WILL INSTALL GAS and 



1033 16th 
Street 




ELECTRIC FIXTURES 

in your residence at Colorado Springs 
same price as Denver, without extra 
charge. Call and select your fixtures, 
or will send you a catalogue. 



DENVtR, 
COLO. 




The Williafflson=Haffner 
Engraving Company 


Office Phone 509-B Residence Ptione Red 871 

DR. HARRY L MOREHOUSE 

DENTIST 

H.urs 9-12, 1:30-5 First N fl Bank BIdf., room 8 


The 50-mile-an-hour Wheel 


1633 Arapahoe Street DENVER 


Reading Standard Bicycles 

SUEFF & KI(i(iS Opposite Flaza Hotel 







The eox Shoe 60. 

107 S. Tejon St. Colorado Springs, Colo. 
J. M. eox 



LADIES, MISSES AND CHILD- 
REN'S SHOES 

MEN'S, YOUTHS' AND BOYS' 
SHOES 



^Perkins Crockerj/ Co. 

E. A. PERKINS, Manager 

120 7f. Vejon Si, 

^ XOcLgon Load of ^ ^ 

Ne^w Wood Type 

And Othef Ma^-tcria^ls 

Q/" the -Oery Latent at 
your 'Di'tposc.l _for 

Wirvdow CoLrds 
Tickets, Flyers £££ 

B J^ G 'RA V I J^ C — e- he Fine si 

The Telegraph Job Rooms 119 e. p. p. Ave. 

Ask wKere TKe Tifipr Is Printed 



JOHN MOFPAT 

Tine Cailoriiig 

Repairing, Cleaning, Pressing. Special rates to 

College Students 
Over Waiting's Book Store 16 South Tejon St. 

VEB W1NG~ 



24 E. Kiowa St. 



Colorado Springs, Colo. 



ROOMS 



Finely furnished. At 730 N. Weber 

FOR RENT: Very reasonable. 
Large, light, comfortable mod- 
ern Rooms. 218 East Dale. 



NEW EMPIRE THEATRE 3 shows Daily v^ l Matinee 3 P. M. 

TToc Evenings 7:30 and 8:45 



IOC 



VAUDEVILLE 



i6 



THE TIGER 



El Paso Cleaning & Tailoring Co> 

10 E. Kiowa St. Phone Main 6674 Colo. Springs 



Pressing Dyeing Altering 

Cleaning Repairing Tailoring 



Prof. Chas. J. Hausdorf 

TEACHER OF MANDOLIN, bllTAR AND BANJO 

Music furnished for weddings, receptions, 

entertainments, etc. 

21 North Tejon. 



ESTABLISHED 1878 

AIKEN 5 
MUSEUM 

COLORADO SPRINGS COLO 



C. F. Arcularius & Co. 
Jewelers 

Diamonds and Watches 

Fine Jewelry Manufacturing 

9 South Tejon St. Coiorado Springs 

The 

Crissey & Fowler Lumber 
Company 

Phone 101 117 to 123 West Vermijo Ave. 

For 'Prompt attention and Satisfactory 
Work, patronize the 

Monarch Hand 
Laundry 

KARL L. MOHLER, Prop. 
W. J. WALLRICH, College Agt. 

A perfect fiUtng shirt necessitates hand %>ork 
Phone 540 329 E. Pikes Peak Ave. 

FINE CHOCOLATE BON BONS 



Name on every Piece 

Ice Cream, Hot and Cold 
Sodas 

Tresh Candies made exery hour 



INION ICE AND COAL COMPANY 

W. IV1. BANNING, Prop. 




Coal, mood and Tec 

Dealers in ail kinds of Coal and Artificial and 
Natural Ice 

id Office, 105 W. Vermijo Ave. City Office, 5 N. Tejon 




Moles and Superflous Hair removed with Electricity 
Hair Goods made to Order 

nirs^ Mnna Betbinan, 

HAIR DRESSING PARLORS 

27 E, Kiowa Phone Red 394 Ladies Bath 

Colorado Springs, Colo. 



Carriages, Cabs, 

'Busses, Baggage and 

Transfer Wagons 

affice, 15 North Cascade 



Denver Law School 

Law Department of the 
University of Denver 

Three years' course leading to the degree of 
Bachelor of Laws. Courses in Mining and Irri- 
gation Law. Full resident faculty. For informa- 
tion address 

LLCIUS W. HOYT, Dean 

Ernest & Cranmer BIdg., Denver, Colo. 

Did You Know 

That our stock of package crackers is so 
great in its variety that you could have a 
change for every day for more than two 
months and yet not exhaust our list? Well, 
it's a fact. We have a kind for every pos- 
sible time and occasion — and they are all 
good. Finest bakery goods in the city. 
Fancy Groceries 

W. N. BURGESS, 112 N. Tejon St. 

Titsworth & Davidson 
DAIRY 

2 MILES S. E. OF f QLORADO SPRINGS. P. 0. BOX 6 

The HoMck'Davidson Coal and Transfer Co. 

Dealers In 

CANON CITY, MAITLAND 

AND LIGNITE COAL 

Phone 473-B. Office US N. Tejon. P. O. Box 275 
Colofado Springs, Colo. 






E6 g Gowdy-Simmoi\s Printing Company 

FOR WINDOW CARDS, TICKETS, ETC. ENGRAVED 
CARDS AND INVITATIONS ON SHORT NOTICE 



2/ TfoHh 

TJoyon Si, 



% eOTRELL & LEONaRO, 

* ALBANY. N. Y. 

* Makers of CAPS and GOWNS to American Col- 

* leges and Universities from the Atlantic to 
the Pacific. Bulletin, samples, etc. 

upon application. 



The People's Qtoczty and Matket 



♦ 

4* 
♦ 

♦ S- JAMES & SON, Props. 



THE DERN TEA AND COFFEE CO. 

Dealers in TEAS, COFFEES, SPICES, 
EXTRACTS, BAKING POWDERS, Etc. 



Phone 575 



29 S. Tejon St. 



PHONE MAIN 868 




222 EAST PIKE'S PEAK 



I 



Colorado Springs, Colorado t 



: ST, JOHN & BARNES 



♦ 

4* 
4- 

* 
4* 
4* 
4> 
4» 
4» 
♦ 
4> 
4> 
4» 
♦ 
4* 
♦ 
4* 

4» 
* 
4» 
♦ 
4» 
4» 
4> 
4* 
4» 
4> 
* 
4» 



Oldest and largest plumbing and heating 

establishment in city. Your 

patronage solicited 



Telephone 13 



206 N. Tejon St. 



Phone Main 151 Established 1897 

p. W. SMITH 

FAMILY GROCER, TEA AND 
COFFEE MERCHANT . : : : : 
Orders Called for and Promptly Delivered 

731 N. Weber St. Colorado Springs, Colo. 
112 Pike's Peak Ave. Telephone 230 

THE COLORADO SPRINGS 
FUEL COMPANY 

H. C. HARMON, Manager. 

Retailers of all the best grades of 

eOAL, eOKB, WOOD and eHAReOAL 

Exclusive Agency in Colorado Springs for all 
coal mined by the Colorado Fuel & Iron Co. 

The best Colorado Springs Lignite Coal for 
both domestic and steam lise furnished promptly. 



For Goodness Sake 



Use TUDOR lower vein Coal 
It beats all other Lignite 

TUDOR COAL COMPANY, Cor. Cascade and Cucharas 

THE MISSES PICK 

dressmakers from the ^ast 

^ooms SSaeor* ^/d^gr., ^O ^i/eo's iPea/e .^vo. 20>*f**^'-a 



Students wishing a special course in Drawing, 41 
Water colors, Oil or China Paintings should call at 4i 
ART STUDIO, 108 N. Tejon. MARION R. FORBUSH, ^ 

Member of Art Institute. Chicago. ^ 

♦ 

4* 
4* 



The ©Id 
6urio Store 

Wholesale and Retail 
Dealers in 

GENUINE INDIAN GOODS AND 
CURIOSITIES 

J. S. CANDELARIO, Prop, 



301 and 303 San Francisco Street, 
SANTA FE, N. M. 



DOVGLrAS 



Phone 556-B 
♦ ♦♦♦ 4> ♦♦♦♦♦♦ 4> 



eSL HETHCICINGTON 

^rchitecf^ 

Rooms 15-16 Outwest Building, Colorado Springs, Colo. 
4i4i4i4i4.4i4.4.4i4i4»4*4*«4*4*«4»4*4>4*4>4*4>4>4>4*4>4i4>«'»S 



4>4»4>4*4>«l»«<l»4*4>4>4*4»4*4»*i"l*4>*i»4>«^4*«l>«l>4>4><»4'4»4> *»♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

♦ The Yo^tig Men^s Store* ♦ 

« . : ♦ 






44 



^^ 



You may be thinking of one of these coats. They 
are the Correct thing for Young Men, especially Col- 
lege Young Men. They have that air about them 
that no other coat has. Let us show you the new 
things for this fall. 



SPECIAL DISCOUNT 
TO STUDENTS 



HOLBROOK & PERKINS 



THE DENVER FIRE CUY CO. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 
AND DEALERS IN 

Chemical and Physicial Apparatus and Chemicals 

A FULL LINE OF LABORATORY SUPPLIES AND ASSAY GOODS 
Write for Illustrated Catalogues 



X 1742-1746 Champa Street, 



DENVER, COLORADO I 



: Excellent ^hotoffraphs 



at BINGHAM & WOOD'S. 18 S. Tejon « 



H. C. COLBURN, Prcs. 



E. A. COLBURN, Jt., Sec'y and Trtas, ^ 



The ^yintler>s ^yttiiomobile Co. 

LIVERY. STORAGE. R^EPAIRING 

Telephone Main 122 S-IO J>f, J^e-Oada AH)e. Colorado Springs, Colo, 




O. R HEMENWAY 



Groceries and Meats 



us South Tejon St. 
Colorado Springs, Colorado 




4'4'4'4'4*4*4*«fr«i*«i*«i>4>'»*i>«l>4*4>4i«l*4*4'«i'4*4'4>«i'*i*4*<l>4><i*<i><f4**»4*<l*«i>*l>4**i'4>4*4>4*<l* 



IHE TIGBR 



Colora.d.o College 



\ 



\ Willett, F E 
1 „io\Voodave 




/ 



OCTOBER. 6tH, 



V01.ViV£ VII. 



1904 

J^umber 4-. 



♦ ♦♦♦******4'***«H*4» ij. 4. 4>4'4*4>4>4*'l>4*4"i*'i»4*^4>4>4>4*4*4*4*4*4*<f4*4»4> 



Special Rates to Students 

On Rented Pianos 




The KNIGHT -eHMPBELL 
Music Company 



4* Hew Lennox Block 
* 

4* 

4* 
4* 
4* 
4* 
♦ 
4* 



v*!>pposite North Park 



St. John Bros./"™^™"' 

Gas and Steam Fitters 

Hot Water Heating a Specialty 

Prompt attention given to Repair Work. 

(Eurtis C^oal go. 

Office 132 N. Teion St. Telephone 91. 

Try ''NEW RANGE" for the Kitchen, $4.00. 
BiTUMNOus Coal at Standard Prices. 

SELDOMRIDGE BROTHERS, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

Flour, Feed, Grain, Hay and Seeds 

108 South Tejon Street 

Repairing while You Wait Satisfaction Guaranteed 

A complete plant of New Machinery for 
the Manufacture of Fine Boots and Shoes 



4* The Lightning Shoe Shop 



BROWN & COMPANY 
We make a specialty of Shoes to Measure and Shoes for 



Cripples. 



28Vi North Tejon St. Coloea do Springs 



Visiting Cards in latest Styles. 

VAIT ^^ advertising in THE TiGER that we 

iUU...»....... appreciate your custom. 

/^ 22 E. Kiowa St. The Pfofflpt Pfiiitery 
The 

Hasseli Iron Works Co. 



Founders and Machinists 



2^c TOolcome 



THE STUDENTS, 

new and old, at our studio, 

Corner Cascade and Kiowa 




71UM 4 



Dealer in Kodaks and Supplies. 



COLLEGE GOWNS, CAPS 

The Best Workmanship 
at Lowest Prices 

Silk Faculty Gowns and Hoods 




COX SONS & VININfi 

262 Fourth Avenue., NEW YORK 



F00T BALLS 

Pants, Nose Guards, 
Tennis Goods 
and Sweaters 



at Strangs 

119 North Tefon Street 



Mueth's 

Soda, Ice Gream 

CATERING 

CHAS. T. FERTIG 

^al Estate, Loans and Insurance 
29 N, Tejon Street 

Tjhe Colorado Spr/nys ^lorai Co, 

FLORISTS 



/O'f ^ortJi ZTo/oM S*ro*t 



i USE ELECTRIC LIGHT 
♦ IN YOUR HOMES 



The Colorado Springs Electric Co. 



♦ 4»4»4»4*4»4i<i»4'4*4»4*4*4»4*'i*<»4»4*4*<i*4>4'4»4>4*4»*i*«i>*l*4»4*4>4*4*4»4* 



4*4>4*'i*4»4* 



THE TIGER 



Student's Book Store Books stationery; all Engi- 

neer's Supplies; College Pins 

and Watch Fobs. Century Fountain Pens $1 to $4, Waterman's $2.50 

^"^ "P- REYER & PUTT. 

For $1 00 D6r month ' ^"'^ sponged and Pressed each week 

—^ 1- PANTATORIUIVI. 

17 East Bijou, Branch Office opp. Plaza Hotel. 



THE COLORADO SPRINGS CO. 

The Original Locators of 

Colorado Springs and 97faniiou 

is still offering for sale choice 
lots on North Weber Street 
and North Wahsatch Avenue 

Also lots for sale in other parts of Colorado Springs 
and in Manitou 

Apply at ROOM 8, OUTWEST BUILDING 

LOUIS ST©eK steam ^ye and Cleaning 

Office and Works, 115 N. Tejon St. 

TELEPHONE 517-B 

Cleaning, Dyeing, Scouring in all its branches 

Ostrich Plumes Cleaned, Dyed and Curled 

Kid Gloves Dyed and Cleaned. 

GIDDINGS BROS. 

FINE DRESS GOODS AND LADIES' 

TAILOR Suits, Ladies' 
^'^ Furnishings 

Kiowa and Tejon Streets. 

CHARLES P. BENNETT 

Real Estate, Loans 
and Insurance^ ^ 

NO. 5 PIKE'S PEAK AVENUE 

D, E. MONROE & CO. 
Prescription Druggist 

The best of Drugs, Stationery and Toilet Articles 

NO LIQUORS SOLD. 
C;or. Teion S( Biiou Phone 311 S( 331 

THE HEFLEY-ARCILARIUS DRUG CO. 
Druggists 

Kodaks, Cameras and all kinds of Photographic 
Supplies. Developing and Printing for Amatuers. 
Free Delivery. 
Phone 144 21 South Tejon Street 



liardware Bicycles 

a. S. BLHKE 

New Chainless Bicycle $35 and $20 
Rambler, Orient and National Automobiles 

Best Kepair Shop in city 107 n. Ceion 

nirs. I^« H. Crooks 

Coilct Parlors at 20 East Kiowa 

Also Room 52, Antlers Hotel 

No Apprentices. Only experienced help employed. 





PARK BAKERY 4^1^- 

Finest Coffee and Lunch Room in the City 
J. SCHAErCR, Prop., Colorado Springs, Colo. 

HENRY^AMM^ 

Druggist 

prescriptions 
toilet articles 
stationery 

All Popular Drinks Served 
at our Soda Fountain 

Plaza Hotel, Cor. Cache la Poudre & Tejon Sts. 

THE RUGBY=PRIMROSE COAL CO. 



an Kinds of Fuel 



Phone 481-A 



West 44-A 



21 N. TEJON ST. 



H. KRAlMZ 



PORCELaiX 

H. KRSNZ & 



F. R. SMITH 



Only 8 Chair Barber Shop in the City 
XObVi B. Pik«*s Peak Ave. 



BaTH TUBS 

e©., Barbers 

Try the t lectric Vibrassage Machine 
eOLORADO SPRINGS. eOLO. 



THB TIGHR. 



When in doubt , take the safe side. 

SEND BUNDLES TO THE 

eoiorado Springs Laundry 



Est. 20 yrs. 



Ralph Rice. College Agt. 



Use Gas 



We sell a GOOD FOUNTAIN PEN for $1 

WHITNEY & GRIMWOOD 

Opera House Btiilding 

We are agents for WATERMAN'S IDEAL FOUNTAIN 
PENS. Prices from $2. 50 up. 



Watchmaker and Jeweler 

15 South TJejon Si, 

7)r. lO. bowler, 

DENTIST 

18 South JJejon St, 



G. W. Pauly, B. S., D. O. Mrs. Lona E. Pauly, B. S. D. O. 

Graduates of A. T. Still's College of Osteopathy, 

Kirksville, Mo. 

DR. & MRS. PAULY, TiW^ilM'' 

Office, rooms 303-304 DeGraff Bldg. 118 N. Tejon St., Colo- 
rado Springs, Colo. Ph nes -Office l<ed 1272; Res. Red 323 
Hours 8 to 12 a. m., 1 to 5 p. m. 



C. W. WARSOP & CO.. 



205 N. Tejon St. 



Draperies, Upholstery Goods, Furniture. Complete line of Screens, 
Pillows, Pillow Tops, Couch Covers, etc. 



Tbe 



Denver 



i)rySoo4$e;o 



Denver 



FRANK E. CRIMP 

FLORIST 

Phone 500 509 E. Columbia St. 

Special attention given to Telephone Orders. 



H. E. BOATRIGHT 

Public Stenographer 

33 GIDDINGS BLDG. 
Rates 5c per 100 words, 50c per hr. extra carbons 5c per page 



The epx Shoe eo. 

107 S. Tejon St. Colorado Springs, Colo. 
J. M. eox 



LADIES, MISSES AND CHILD- 
REN'S SHOES 

MEN'S, YOUTHS' AND BOYS' 
SHOES 



FRANK H. SMALL watches, Diamonds, fine Watch Wori<. Special 

113 Pike's Peak Ave. 



Jeweler and Silversmith P"ce to Students. 



t;he TIOCR. 



Vol. VII. 



COLORADO COLLEGE, OCTOBER 6, 1904. 



No. 4 



ISABEL VIOLET ROSAMOND 



I closed my notebook with a sigh of relief and 
hr.rried across the hall to Priscilla's room. 
"Come," said she, in response to my knock, and 
in I went to find her sitting at her desk with 
her head propped on her hands, reading a letter. 

"Hello, Jen," she remarked, "Will you listen 
to this? 'Dear Priscilla:' — (it's from my little 
sister, Janet, you know) — 'Dear Priscilla: T 
have just finished getting my arithmetic and 
thought I 'd write you. It is very warm today. 
Isabel Violet Rosamond lost her hair this morn- 
ing, but I found it again.' I. V. R.'s her doll," 
explained Priscilla. " 'Priscilla, you said you had 
to be economical,' " Priscilla dimpled. "I had to 
write home for money sooner than was proper," 
she said, "and I thought it best to be politic about 
it — 'had to be economical, so I'm 
afraid maybe you ought not to buy me 
a birthday present. My birthday is a week 
from Sunday, you know, and I thought you would 
not like to not give me anything, and I think 
i<: would be nice if you dressed Isabel Violet 
Rosamond for me. Brother Fred said he did, 
too, so I'm going to send her to you and you 
can dress her and send her back. Fred said as 
long as you were so poor you'd better send her 
C. O. D. We can play she has been to Paris, 
and I hope you'll like it. I think it will be lots 
of fun.' (Groan from Priscilla.) 'You said 
you had sprained your wrist. I'm sorry and 
hope it will be better before Isabel gets there. 
I must close now. 

'Your loving sister, 

'Janet M. Sawyer.' 

"Well," ,said Priscilla, "wouldn't that— er— jar 
you, as one has well said? Let me see. Today is 
Thursday and tomorrow I'm on the program for 
society; Saturday we're going on that tramp. I 
can't sew on Sunday. Monday I was thinking 
of — of — reforming the stage a little. Of course 
I'm not exactly going to vaudeville," she hastened 
to explain, "just — just to study conditions, you 
know. Tuesday — let me see— I believe I'm going 
tc give a fudge party. Wednesday I'm going out 
for supper. Thursday I really ought to work a 
little on my seminar; it comes Friday, you know. 
Saturday— I ought to send the doll back before 
then, I think. Well, speak up, Jen; when am I 
going to dress Isabel Violet Rosamond?" 



"I don't exactly know," I confessed. 
"Oh, well, I suppose I'll find some time," said 
Priscilla, "and I can have you girls here help me 
when you come to my party. Isn't it fortunate 
I thought of that? Let's go down now and see 
if I. V. R. has come." 

I. V. R. had come. On the hall table lay an 
express package — prepaid — for Miss Priscilla 
Sawyer. 

We carried it up to her room and opened it. 
Isabel Violet Rosamond was lifted out and 
placed on the bed, from which vantage point she 
regarded Priscilla with a stern and glassy eye. 

Priscilla squirmed. "Don't you think I'd bet- 
ter cut out being on the program tomorrow, and 
dress her then?" she whispered. "She looks as if 
she expected it." 

"I rather think not," I replied. "Try a little 
diplomacy with her, Priscilla." 

Just before ten that night I went into Priscilla's 
room to find her cutting up her silk jacket. It 
vvas comparatively new, and I exclaimed in horri- 
fied tones, "Priscilla, what are you doing?" 

"Cutting out I. V. R.'s dress. Don't you think 
this tan silk will make a lovely shirt waist suit?" 

"Yes; but how can you cut up that lovely 
jacket?" 

*Tm tired of tan," said Priscilla; "I'd rather 
have a black one; so it really doesn't matter — 
there's the bell, Jen, go to bed." 

We saw little of Priscilla till Tuesday night, 
when she gave her fudge party. She requested us 
to bring our "sewing utensils," and put us to 
work as soon as we appeared on the scene of 
action. 

"The dress is all done," she announced. "All 
you have to do is to make the underclothes while 
I tend to the fudge and amuse you. Dear me," 
after a moment of silence, "will some one please 
put Isabel Violet down flat so she'll shut her 
eyes? I'm on the verge of nervous prostration 
now. She disapproves of me awfully, and the 
other night when we were laughing about the 
Seniors being the wildest crowd in college, I 
came in here and she said as plainly as words, 
'Tut, tut! Aren't you ashamed?' Haven't you 
noticed how subdued I've been lately? No won- 
der Janet is such a proper young one. I. V. R. 
would make anyone proper." 

After Isabel Violet Rosamond was dressed in 



THE TIGER 



her new attire Priscilla said she must have some 
relaxation after the strain, and we were a little 
hilarious. So much so, in fact, that the chairman 
of the House Committee descended in wrath and 
called us down. But on being invited in to see 
I. V. R. and have some fudge, she forgot her of- 
ficial position and remained to help in the mer- 
riment. 

At last about eleven a familiar rat-tat-tat 
sounded on the door, and Priscilla whispered, 
"Gracious, the Dean !" 

The chairman of the House Committee and I 
made for the closet ; two girls rolled under the 
bed ; one got behind the screen, and the rest 
faded away into the next room. Then Priscilla 
opened the door. 

"Won't you come in?" she asked. "I know it 
is a trifle late, but Isabel leaves tomorrow, and 
so we were celebrating." 

The Dean came in. "Isabel who?" she in- 
quired. 

"Isabel Violet Rosamond," said Priscilla, des- 
perately. "Do sit down, Miss Durham, and I'll 
explain." 

So she read Janet's letter and then showed 
I. V. R. in all her glory. 

Miss Durham laughed. "But," she said, "sure- 
ly you and — and Isabel Violet Rosamond weren't 
making all that noise. She seems to be a very 
quiet and proper young person, and you aren't 
usually quite so noisy." 

"Have some fudge, do. Miss Durham. I'm 
sorry, but I'm afraid the lights are going out in a 
minute and my candle is upstairs, and — " ~~ 

"I think I know my way, Priscilla, though it 
\z kind of you to be so concerned. But before 
I go I should like to — no, I'm not going to look 
for the other young ladies," as Priscilla backed 
toward the closet door, "I was only about to say 
that I should like to remind you that 3'ou are a 
Senior, not a Freshman. Now that being the 
case, do you think this was a very nice thing to 
do? You—" 

Here the lights went out; there was a thump, 
a crash, and a startled exclamation from Miss 
Durham. 

"Never mind," said Priscilla soothingly, "it 
was only the tea table and you probably haven't 
wakened more than a dozen people. Perhaps I'd 
better take your hand. I know the halls at night 
quite well." 

Next day Isabel Violet Rosamond went home 
C. O. D., according to instructions. That night 
Miss Durham reminded us of our duty as Seniors, 
but, as Priscilla said, "not in her usual happy 
fashion." £. I r. 



THE EDUCATIONAL CONFERENCE AT 
ST. LOUIS. 

President Slocum's remarks last Friday morn- 
ing were confined to his impressions of the great 
educational congress held at St. Louis. The 
substance of his address was as follows : 

The educational congress held at St. Louis 
was probably greater and more world-wide than 
any of those which have occurred in the past. 
The United States sent there over one hundred 
of her foremost college tnd university presidents. 
Oxford and the other renowned institutions of 
Great Britain were likewise represented. Ger- 
many, France and even far away Japan helped 
to make the gathering universal and world-wide. 
Among the many interesting and instructive 
speeches, that of Mr. Bryce was especially note- 
worthy from the fact that he is the author of 
the fammous "American Commonwealth." How- 
ever, the most impressive address of all remained 
to be given by the representative — not of America, 
jnor of England, nor of Germany, but of Japan. 
The speech itself was given in English, by a 
Japanese graduate of Yale University. It echoed 
the deepest sentiment in the hearts of great men 
today, when the Russo-Japanese war was re- 
gretted and condemned as immoral and inhuman. 
Besides the many addresses on the theories of 
education in general, specialists in every branch 
of science read able and instructive papers on 
the present evolution of their particular sub- 
jects. 

The speeches and discussions on the elective 
system showed the tendency of today in regard 
to that theory of education. A number of years 
ago, Harvard, and one or two other institutions 
introduced the elective system. Then it was 
feared that the college, as distinguished from 
the university, would eventually be wiped out, 
and that education for its own sake would be 
abandoned. Today, however, a reaction has set 
in. Many of the foremost scholars of this coun- 
try and of Europe believe that the elective sys- 
tem, if not an absolute failure, is, at least, far 
behind expectations. Now the "old school" idea 
of education for its own sake is again coming 
into favor. More and more are men beginning 
to believe that the mind is a thing worth training 
and developing, simply because it is the mind. 
Germany, especially, emphasizes this doctrine. 
It firmly believes that the only salvation for the 
United States lies in the survival and preserva- 
tion of the college, and in education for its own 
sake. That such a doctrine is sound and rea- 
sonable is shown by the fact that specialists and 
scientists owe their greatest failures to the lack 
of a college course. Likewise four years of good 
college training are necessary to professional 
men, whether lawyers, doctors, teachers, or any 



THH TIGER 



branch of professional life. It is the greatest 
kind of a mistake to make the last year of your 
college course be the first year of your law 
course or to imagine that you are fitted for uni- 
versity work after you have spent two years in 
college. 

Another theory that was advanced, especially 
b> the universities of Great Britain, was the 
value of small colleges. The enrollment of two 
or three thousand students is as much to be de- 
plored from one standpoint, as it is to be re- 
joiced at from another. 

But especially interesting to Colorado Col- 
lege is the fact that this great educational con- 
gress teaches us that our work is worth while. It 
teaches us that that great movement is world- 
wide, and that we are part of it. It teaches us 
that it is worth while to struggle against adver- 
sity, and to try to build up a college here in the 
West. 



MR. AND MRS. RUGER ENTERTAIN. 

The boys in Hagerman Hall were pleasantly 
entertained on Monday last by Mr. and Mrs. 
Ruger in the reading rooms. After a number of 
musical numbers by Messrs. KauU, Doane and 
Nash the boys entered into a wildly exciting game 
of egg-football, in which the "wind" of the en- 
thusiasts was tested to its full capacity. Then 
followed some refreshments really cut out for 
boys, not sample copies but the real thing, and to 
help digestion in her task the boys played "Pass 
the Peanut," or "who can pinch the most peanuts 
without being caught." The rest of the evening 
was passed in the singing of College songs, and 
the whole repertoire was gone through with, from 
"Mr. Dooley" to "My Darling Clementine." The 
boys then departed to short seances with Math 
A and German, voting the evening a most happy 
one and their hostess and host most charming en- 
tertainers. 



THE TENNIS TOURNAMENT. 



Entries are now open for the Fall Tournament, 
and it is hoped that the matches will be hotly 
contested and that everyone will get into the 
play. A large number of prizes have been of- 
fered by prominent firms in the city, and it is 
no more than justice to them that the entries 
should be numerous. Names should be handed 
to Mr. Nash, President. A schedule of matches 
will be posted Friday morning, at which time en- 
tries for the first series will be closed. The fol- 
lowing is a list of matches with prizes and names 
of the firms who have helped to make this tour- 
nament possible : 



I'IRST SiCKIIiS. MEN S SINGI.ES. 

First Prize — Spalding tennis racket, offered by 
the Strang Sporting Goods Co. 

Second Prize- — Tennis sweater, best quality, of- 
fered by the A. H. Whaite Co. 

FIRST SERIES. EADIES' SINGEES. 

First Prize — Tennis sweater, best quality, offered 

by Holbrook & Perkins. 
Second Prize — Leather tennis shoes, offered by 

Vorhes Shoe Co. 
Third Prize — Consolation, silver tennis racket pin, 

offered by Arcularius Jewelry Co. 

SECOND SERIES, men's DOUBEES. 

First Prizes — Gold plated tennis racket pin for 
each player, offered by Ashby. 

THIRD series, mixed DOUBEES. 

Prizes to be announced later. 

N. B. — These entries are open to all members 
of the Association, whether in College or Acad- 
emy. Cards of admission may be demanded. Pay 
your dues now and get into the game. 



Street Urchin (to Chapman) — Gi' me a match. 

Stuffie — Can't give you one, my boy ; I don't 
want to hurt your health. 

Street Urchin — Aw, gon on ; my health is as 
good as yours. 



The Student Volunteer Band for Foreign Mis- 
sions met Sept. 13 and elected the following offi- 
cers : Leader, Mr. French, '08; Secretary, Miss 
Gordon, '06. 

We have already held three very interesting and 
spiritual meetings. We gladly welcome to our 
Band two new members from other schools, and 
six that have just signed the declaration, "It is 
my purpose, if God permits, to become a Foreign 
Missionary." 

The meetings at present are held in Ticknor 
Study, Saturday at i 145 P. M. 



li as I lay dying 

[ should write my epitaph, saying : 

"He lies here who broke 

All the commandments save one" 

Lo, after my death 

Should any ten of my friends assemble, 

Speculating over my solitary virtue. 

They would each pick a different commandment, 

Is it a wonder, then. 

That one has friends? — Leto. 



AS SEEN BY OUR MOTHERS. 

"A rush, a scramble, 
A tackle, a fall; 
Six wounded, three senseless. 
Four dead — that's football." 

— Bxchayii^i- 



fHB fiGER. 



THg TIGER. 

Published weekly during the College year by 
The Tigi:r Publishing Co., in the interest of Colo- 
rado College. 

J. Y. Crothers Editor-in-Chief 

T. Hunter Assistant Editor-in-Chief 

J. I. Muffley Athletic Editor 

Miriam Carpenter Literary Editor 

Mabel Barbee Alumni Editor 

A. H. Fisher Local Editor 

Bert Wasley Business Manager 

C. A. Hedblom .... Assistant Business Manager 

CORRESPONDENTS : 

Mr. Nash, Miss McDowell, Miss Isham, Miss 
Kidder, Mr. Lamb, Mr. Reeks, Miss Arbuckle. 

Subscription, $1.25 per year, payable in advance. 
Single copy, 5 cents. 

The Tiger is forwarded to all subscribers until 
ordered discontinued and all arrearanges are paid. 

Students, Professors and Alumni are invited 
to contribute literary articles, personals and items. 
Contributions must be accompanied by the writer's 
name. 

Address all communications to The Tiger, 
Colorado College, Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Entered at the Postoffice at Colorado Springs, 
Colo., as second-class matter. 



Patroniise Tiger Advertisers 



EDITORIAL 

WANTED ! 

CIERCER competition for positions on the 
Board for next year. Already the contri- 
butions which are filed as a basis of the election 
for next year's editors is assuming some bulk, 
but the contributors are too few. If you want 
to get some practical experience in college jour- 
nalism next year you will have to begin soon 
writing something for the TiGER. Even poems 
will be welcome, though we cannot promise to 
print all that are submitted. However, all literary 
articles dropped into the Tiger box in Coburn 
Library will be preserved, and will count in the 
spring election. In after life you may have oc- 
casion to write something for publication, indeed 
as a college bred person you should broaden your 
influence in this way. It will be of great benefit 
to you to be accustomed to seeing something of 
your own composition in print. 

The hotelkeeper was right, who posted a placard 
saying, "If you like my service, tell others. If 
you don't like it, tell me." You may not like the 



way the TiGER is being edited or managed. If so, 
tell your reasons for your dislike to the editor. 
But that is not enough. The TiGER belongs to 
all the students of the College, and it is the busi- 
ness to every student not only to criticise, but 
to do every thing in his power to make the TiGER 
the best student publication in the state. Each 
college or university in the state sends out its 
school paper to many of the high schools in Colo- 
rado and adjoining states. These papers have a 
very great influence on the decisions of high 
school students as to the institution in which they 
shall pursue their education. Be loyal to your 
College, and help put it on top by contributing to 
the Tiger. 



MORE NOISE. 



ATS/ITH what a haughty tread he spurns the 
' ' earth ! How disdainfully he regards us or- 
dinary mortals ! And yet it is with a countenance 
filled with benevolence for all mankind that he 
goes about his common duties — just as if nothing 
had happened. Were he the Czar of all the Rus- 
sias the journals of the world would have chron- 
icled the event, and a hundred million souls would 
have hailed with joy the arrival of the heir ap- 
parent. As it is, a few of us may expect unprece- 
dented leniency in the matter of cuts and flunks 
for a few weeks, then the grind will be on again. 
The Tiger hopes to be able to announce the first 
tooth before many moons have passed, then the 
first prattling words and the first tottering steps. 
In future years the athletics, oratory, music, schol- 
arship of Colorado College will feel the influence 
of this genius. Hadn't you heard about it? It's 
a boy. Long live Jakey Junior. 



FOOTBALL SCORES LAST WEEK. 

At Chicago — Chicago 56, Indiana o. 

At Carlisle — Carlisle Indians 41, Gettysburg o. 

At Philadelphia — Pennsylvania 24, Virginia o. 

At Ann Arbor — Michigan ^z, Case o. 

At West Point— West Point 12, Tufts o. 

At New York — Columbia 16, Wesleyan o. 

At New Haven — Yale 42, Trinity o. 

At Minneapolis — Minnesota 65', Carleton o. 

At Iowa City — Iowa 88, Cornell o. 

At Lawrence— University of Kansas 34, State 
Normal o. 

At Chicago — Northwestern University 34, 
Northwestern College o. 

At Ames, Iowa— Ames 22, Coe College o. 

At Des Moines — Drake University 18, Buen.i 
Vista College o. 

At Champaign, 111. — University of Illinois 11, 
Knox College o. 

At Madison — Wisconsin 45, Sheridan Sol- 
diers o. 



THB TIGER 




ATHLETIC 
DEPARTMENT 



p00 0j^j^j^ jt^^j^j^j^i^ 



Tigers Win A Gteat Victoi^y 



The large and enthusiastic crowd of rooters 
that gathered on Washburn Field last Saturday 
saw a game of football that abounded in spec- 
tauclar and scientific plays. The College Tigers 
were there, and well did they defend their won- 
derful reputation for fierce, fast playing by de- 
feating the veterans from Pueblo. Never before 
this had the goal of the Pueblo warriors been 
crossed or even in danger, but the Tigers ac- 
complished the wonderful feat. 

There were slight defects, such as ignoring in- 
terference, tackling around the neck, holding with 
both arms, and inattention to signals, noticeable 
in the play of the College team, but it was all to 
be expected of a team that has so recently 
learned to "play the game." On the other hand, 
the veterans from Pueblo played a good game, 
but were unable to play as fast as the Tigers 
wished, but it was probably just an act of cour- 
tesy to soothe our injured feelings. 

No particular player on the College team suc- 
ceeded in playing any worse than another, for 
they all succeeded admirably in showing what 
they do not know about football. 

Moore started the game by kicking off to 
Mack on the 2-yard line, but the ball was fumbled 
and Mack too it out to the 25-yard line and 
punted the ball the whole di-stance of eighteen 
yards. In three plays directed against center, 
Pueblo made first down, and on the next play 
Walters made twenty yards around right end, 
putting the ball on the 15-yard line. Right end 
looked good to Walters, and he tried it again for 
ten yards, when Shorty delayed our humiliation 
about a minute by downing him on the 5-yard 
line. Three fast, vicious plays through the line 
put the ball over. Moore missed an easy goal. 
Pueblo 5, C. C. o. 

Moore kicked to Morgan, who made five yards. 
On the next play Mack fumbled, but Morgan re- 
covered the fall and got around left end for 
twenty yards. Hill dashed around right end for 
ten and twenty yards. 



Morgan made twenty yards around left end, 
but the ball was taken back and the College 
penalized five yards for holding, but Mack didn't 
see the fellow. On the next play the College lost 
five yards, more offside play. Mack made twelve 
yards on a brilliant dash on a fake kick, but it 
was not enough, and Pueblo got the ball. On a 
fake pass Walters made ten yards, but Moore was 
forced to kick, and Randolph almost caught the 
ball. Shorty made ten yards, and Hill got away 
for the same distance. Then Morgan tore off 
forty yards and got up ready to take the ball 
back, but the official said nothing about it, so the 
Tigers kept on playing. Randolph made twenty 
yards, and Mack made a pretty buck for the 
touchdown that defeated Pueblo. Lennox kicked 
goal from a difficult angle. Score, Pueblo 5, 
C. C. 6. 

Moore again kicked off to Randolph on the 
"30-yard line. Runs around the ends by Randolph, 
Morgan, Mack and Hill put the ball on the 25- 
yard line, when time was called for the end of 
the first half. 

The second half was a series of errors and 
rests. Vandemoer did some good work, and Sey- 
bold, who replaced Morgan, played aggressively. 
Neither goal was threatened in this half, and 
both teams seemed to be in a ood humor. The 
whistle blew with the ball on Pueblo's 35-yard 
line in possession of the l^igers. 

The lineup : 

C. C. Pueblo. 

Kaul-Johnston L. E Prior 

Vandemoer L. T Humitts 

Hedblom L. G Taylor 

Mosteller-Bale C Orten 

Faucett R. G Whitlock 

Nead-Howbert R. T Young 

Lennox (c) R. E Clucas 

Hill L. H. B Walters (c) 

Morgan-Seybold ... R. H. B Lannon 

Mack F. B Moore 

Randolph Q. B Graham 



8 



ThU flGBR. 



Referee, Frost, Harvard; Umpire, Johnson, 
Colorado College ; Timekeeper, Cooper ; Lines- 
men, Tucker and Zieger. 



ATHLETIC NOTES. 

Boulder went to Utah last Saturday and defeat- 
ed the State University 2)Z to 6. But Utah does 
not have much of a team. 

The Aggies defeated North Denver High 
School 24 to II. How are the mighty fallen! 

The Miners struck a Tartar in East Denver 
but won in the second half by 10 to o. 

D. U. defeated Sacred Heart in a ragged game, 
17 to o. 

Boulder looks strong, but they have not been 
properly tried out yet. Wait until the 29th. 



ALUMNI NOTES. 

D. U. seems to be the center of attraction this 
year for C. C. Alumni. The Law School is es- 
cially popular. McClintock, '03, and Work, '03, 
are taking second year law, and Marvelle Carter, 
'03, will graduate from the Law School next 
June. 

Carl Plumb, ex-'o3, is a third year medical 
student at D. U. 

"Peggy" Hoyne, '01, is studying medicine in 
Iowa this year. 

Lake, '03, is continuing his studies in the New 
York Law School. 

Rastall, '01, leaves for Madison this week, 
where he will enter the University of Wisconsin. 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Ewing (nee Currier, '03) 
welcomed a baby boy to their home last week. 

Earl Cleaveland, ex-'o5', left last Thursday 
night for Mexico. He will be gone all winter. 

Dr. Mary Noble is a medical missionary in 
India. 

P. D. Rice, '04, passed through Colorado 
Springs Sunday. Mr. Rice reports a splendid 
trip to St. Louis. 



TIGER NOTES. 



Miss Wallace, '08, leaves for her home today. 

President and Mrs. Slocum entertained at 
dinner Saturday night the Misses Leidigh, Fezer 
and Wallace, and Messrs. Keyes, Anderson and 
Fmney. 

A very exclusive crowd took a tramp up to 
Crystal Park Saturday afternoon. They report 
a fine time. 



Miss Brown arrives this week, 
niatron of McGregor Hall. 



She is to be 



The Sophomore girls of Montgomery Hall 
entertained at a spread for Misses Pitman, Frost 
and Pease Saturday evening. 

As is usual in the fall, the Freshman have 
the "Ouija Board" fever and spread every even- 
ing in inquiring into their fulines. 



Blueprint pillows with the College views 
them are all the fad now. 



m 



The members of one table in Ticknor dining 
room have named themselves Celestials in honor 
of their efforts to promote peace and harmony 
at meal time. 



At the Modern Language Conference held 
here last February, a committee was appointed 
to petition the directors of the State Teachers' 
Association for a section devoted to foreign 
modern languages. This petition has just been 
granted and the new section has been formed. A 
program is now being arranged for the meeting 
in Denver during the Christmas holidays. The 
members of the state committee are: Prof. E. 
L. Hills, Colorado College, Chairman; Mr. W. 
C. Arundel, East Denver High School, Secre- 
tary; Miss Alice Hurford, Central High School, 
Pueblo, and Prof. C. C. Ayer, University of 
Colorado. The name. Section of Foreign Mod- 
ern Languages, was adopted, because English, 
the most important of the modern languages, 
was not included. 



A New Member of the Faculty — Your name is 
Professor Urdahl? 
Hedblom— Not if I know it. 

The future Tigers may be seen practicing on the 
east end of the campus every Saturday. 



Jeannette Sholz, '03, is at the College this 
year, studying for the Master's degree. 



Pearson's goat got busy Friday. He is larger, 
stronger and in better condition than ever before. 



THB TIGBR. 



According to the library bulletin board, a foun- 
tain pen was found walking from Palmer Hall to 
Coburn. 

Wasley made a flying trip to Denver Friday. 

How about the fellow that sat on the tank of 
hydrogen ? Ask Crothers. 

Painter was here on a short visit this week. 

Pearsons goat will get his fill when he has 
gotten through with Doane, Moore, Musser, Bur- 
gess, Morgan, Slane, Mohler, Currier, Swing and 
Lovewell. 

Ask Keyes if he has a little fairy in his home. 

Misses Pitman, Frost and Winifred Pease were 
the guests of honor at a spread given by seven 
Sophomore girls at Montgomery Hall. Salad, 
Welsh rarebit, pickles and fudge, with ghost sto- 
ries to add a flavor, were enjoyed by all. 

The parlor at Montgomery has been refur- 
nished , and it is now very attractive. N. B. 

Mr. Painter has been visiting at the College 
this last week. 

Two fudge parties and one spread is not a bad 
week's record even for Montgomery. 

Heard at the Game. — "If the Pueblo team could 
run like the red in their sweaters, they'd make 
a touchdown." 

Prof. Brehaut believes with the Germans that 
to fall into the hands of the women is worse than 
death. 

Did our boys ever hear of the Pueblo High 
School tea? 

"Pll bet the Freshen don't have a party — if the 
Sophs can stop them." 

Strieby in Chem B — Quite a bunch of roosters 
on the back roost up there. (To one of the roost- 
ers) You seem to have that argument very clearly 
in mind, about as clear as mud, I should say. 

Caj — I would like to chew some gum myself. 

We missed Fisher in Saturday's game. 

Some girls do like pork chops. 

Cheer up, Freshies, you will get another chance 
at those quadratics. 



Prof. Ahlers in German B — Not Kaser, but 
Kaiser, — ^Kase, Kaser, I wonder what the superla- 
tive is, limburger, I suppose. 

Prof Ahlers— Is there such a fellow as Fisher? 

Z. — What did you say Prof. C. is doing? 
B. — Gold mining at the Park Bakery. 

The Freshmen say they had a jolly good time 
at the Junior's party. 

Prof. Brehaut, in Tacitus Class— The German 
men did not dare run away from a fignt, for if 
they did they fell into the arms of the women, 
and that was bad for them." (Then he blushed.) 

A birthday spread was given in honor of Miss 
Mabel Lewis Saturday evening. 

A party of twelve Freshman girls feasted on 
hot cakes and syrup at the Park Bakery Friday 
evening. 

Wanted — At the Phoedus Club, one can of 
salmon ! ! 

Miss Park chaperoned a jolly crowd of girls 
to Crystal Park Saturday. 

Four of the Minerva town girls gave a spread 
for some of their friends in the Halls on Friday 
evening. 

President and Mrs. Slocum entertained a few 
of the students most informally Thursday even- 
ing. 

Miss Jessie Smith was the guest of Miss Clara 
Cowing at dinner Sunday. 

Math B was greatly exercised over not getting 
a cut Thursday. 



WHO'S IT? 



The following exchanges seem remarkably ap- 
propriate to the subject. If you do not know 
who is meant by the first, just ask some member 
of Hypatia. 

Some people drink cider just because it is 
good for rheumatism and gout, and others just 
because it is good. 

If the following seems rather obscure, you 
may get some light on the subject by asking one 
of the members of the Faculty: 

There is music in the heir — when the baby 
cries. 



IC 



THE TIGHR 



SOCIETIES AND ASSOCIATIONS 



APOLLONIAN CLUB. 

"Origin and Growth of Socialism" Morgan 

"Political Platform of Socialists" . . Vandemoer 

"The Socialist Leaders" Howbert 

Piano Solo Bartlett 

Debate— "Resolved, That the United States 
government should secure shipyards and 
build its own ships." 

Affirmative M. Smith, McBride 

Negative Middlesworth, West 

MINERVA. 

Programme, Oct. 7 : 

Shakespeare and His Age — 

"The England of Elizabeth". . .Miss Reinhardt 

"Famous Men of the Day" Miss Palmer 

"Shakespeare and His Friends"-. .Miss Cowing 

Song 



PEARSONS LITERARY SOCIETY. 

Roll Call, answered by quotations from Brec 
Harte. 

Oration , Thomas 

Socratic Debate— "Resolved, That the prin- 
ciple of free trade is more logical than 
that of protection." 

Affirmative Givens 

Negative Lamb 

Parliamentary Drill 

Music Cobert 



CONTEMPORARY CLUB. 

The Contemporary program for Friday, Oct. 

7, will be as follows : 

"Feudal System in Japan" Miss Porter 

"Japanese Religions ; Their Relation to Na- 
tional Development" Miss Haynes 

"Some Popular Superstitions" Miss Brush 

All are cordially invited. 



Y. W. C. A. 



The subject of the last meeting" was "Personal 
Influence." Miss Brush led, and brought out 
clearly the importance of setting an example. We 
should be careful in all things, for who knows 
what may be the influence of our actions on oth- 
ers. We should try to exhibit self-control and 
try at all times to be cheerful. In fact, to do 
all in our power to help others throughout all 
our lives. 



Y. M. C. A. 

Sunday afternoon Rev. Haycraft, of the Mt. 
Olive Baptist church, spoke to the young men 
upon "Keeping the Sabbath; or. Sabbath Dese- 
cration." Speaking from the young man's stand- 
point, the more practical side of the question was 
brought out, showing wherein a man could get 
more out of work and study by working six days 
and resting on the Sabbath. Mr. Hedblom pre- 
sided. 



HYPATIA. 



The line of work to be followed this semester 
io a comparative study of Russia and Japan. 

Next Friday Prof. Urdahl will speak to us of 
the early history of Russia and Japan. 

Visitors welcome. 



HYPATIA. 



Last Wednesday evening Hypatia entertained 
the new girls at an "autumn spread." Ticknor 
Study was tastefully decorated in brilliant au- 
tumn foliage. 

Ropes of sumac and wild rose branches were 
looped over doors and windows, vines hung from 
chandeliers and mantlepiece, and here and there 
a yellow Jack-o'-lantern showed his smiling face. 

The same brilliant color scheme was carried 
out in table decorations, red and gold dahlias 
adding brightness to the salad table and nastur- 
tiums to the fudge. 

Dream cakes, fudge and penoche were made in 
chafing-dishes during the evening. Sandwiches, 
salad and olives were served. Last, but not least, 
came Hypatia punch — sweet cider. The sou- 
venirs were little daisies bearing the society pin, 
the date and the menu. 

During the evening the Ouija Board figured 
prominently, the Hypatia girls gave some of their 
society songs. Miss Zinn sang "The Message of 
the Violets" and responded with "Sammy" to the 
encore. The rest of the time was spent in 
dancing. 

All present seemed so pleased with the au- 
tumnal idea whic hmarked all phases of the en- 
tertainment, that the society has decided to make 
the autumnal spread an annual affair. 



Mr. Buttercup — I don't tjiink this tie you 
bought me is quite up to the mark. 

Mrs. Buttercup— Oh, Thomas, don't say that! 
It was marked only 30 cents. 



THB TIGBR 



XI 



ACADEMY DEPARTMENT 

Farle S. Alden Editor 

P . C. Merrill Athletic Editor 



ENTHUSIASTIC MEETING. 

The meeting of the student body of the Acad- 
emy just after Chapel on Monday was charac- 
terized, by the interest manifested by everyone 
present. 

Prof. Gile called the meeting to order and spoke 
of the importance of having more than enough 
men for a team on the field every night, pointing 
out the fact that the work of more than twelve 
men is necessary to make a successful team. Mr. 
Gile emphasized, as he always does, the necessity 
of each student's taking regular exercise, and 
said that football was exactly what a number 
of the fellows need. Speeches by Allebrand, 
Bernard and Painter, of last year's basketball 
team, followed. Painter spoke with his usual 
enthusiasm and in a most convincing manner. 
He spoke, moreover, as one who knows (and 
Painter surely ought to) of the benefit a fellow 
gets from putting good hard work into athletics. 
He said one always gets more out of it than he 
puts in, and at this point Captain Allebrand 
nodded his head in positive affirmation, and 
there was no doubt left as to the truth of the 
statement. 

Mr. Fitch then took the "stump" amid 'the 
cheering, of the students. "Them's my senti- 
ments," said Mr. Fitch, referring to the decided 
expressions of Mr. Painter. He spoke with feel- 
ing of the kind of baseball team the Academy put 
out last year, of the quality of work of the indi- 
vidual members of the team, and of the impor- 
tance of a good team in advertising a school. 

Just before the meeting closed, Allebrand called 
for pledges on the part of the candidates for the 
team, and to a man they arose to their feet, prom- 
ising their support of the team. Nineteen men 
were there and several men were not at Chapel. 
This means at least a first and second team on the 
field every evening. Already the fellows cease 
to speak with the same certainty when referring 
to their position on the team. From present in- 
dications several of the fellows who are now 
holding down regular positions will be given a 
"run for their money." 



HESPERIAN. 



At the last meeting the society had the pleasure 
of welcoming five new members and several pros- 
pective members and visitors. The membership 
roll is increasing constantly, and this year seems 



to promise a larger membership than ever before. 
The program rendered was a literary one, and 
for the most part was a study of Lowell. Hoover 
also made a speech on "Football and Its History." 
Jameson acted as critic, and his suggestions were 
all timely ones. Next Friday's program is posted. 



ACADEMY NOTES. 

Jackson, Maguire, Johnson and Alden went on 
a tramp to Saint Mary's Falls last Saturday. 

Jack — Doesn't Johnson look like Teddy Roose- 
velt? 

William — He looks like a cartoon of him. 

Cash Elliott of the Pueblo Central High School 
was visiting the Sigma Frat over Sunday. 

Assistant Manager Alden of the basketball team 
is in correspondence with several schools con- 
cerning a schedule. The prospects for a good 
schedule seem flattering. 

The Third Class will take the initiative this 
year by giving a party. The date is not yet 
agreed upon. 

Miss Dickinson, ex-'o4, has just left for Chi- 
cago, where she will be in school again this year. 

Dickerman can tell you some interesting tales 
about a burglar. He claims to have discovered 
a brand new thrill. 



Miss Hubbard was 
week. 



for a day or two last 



EXCHANGES. 

He stole a kiss and gave it back, 
'Twas in the sheltering woods, 

She, too, was guilty, for, alack, 
Receiving stolen goods. 

The co-eds of the Northwestern University of 
Chicago have been forbidden to whistle, perhaps 
because when they got their lips pursed up in 
the preparatory pucker they looked just too 
tempting for their fellow students to resist. 

When you examine a dog's lungs under the 
X-ray, what do you find? 



t2 



THB TIGBR. 



EXCHANGES 



A. — The seat of his pants. 
But when you look in his mouth, what do you 
f md ? 
A. — The seat of somebody else's pants. 

Teacher — What is a synonym, Freddie? 
Freddy — A snynonym is a word to be used in 
place of another word you can't spell. 

Fitz-Bile — I never knew till this morning that 
De Broune was a wildly extravagant chap. 
• Van Quizz — Neither did I. Is he? 

Fitz-Bile — Of course. My dear Van, he mar- 
ried a girl who isn't in society — yet. — New Or- 
leans Tim es-Dem o crat. 

He- — Did you hear about the fall-out the other 
day. 

She— No. 

He — It rained. — Bethany Messenger. 

Parson — Why don't you reform and get into 
the race of life in this world ? 

Weary Willy — Why ! I'm already in it — I'm 
a globe trotter. 

A very grandiloquent goat 
Sat down at a gay table d'hote. 



He ate up the corks. 
The knives and the forks, 
Remarking, "On these things I dote." 

Customer — Do you think patent medicines are 
as good as they are represented to be by the 
makers ? 

Druggist — No ; nor as bad as they are ^repre- 
scnted to be by the doctors. 

The editor of the TiGER last year will sympa- 
thize most heartily with his fellow sufferer in 
this: 

Angry Poet (rushing into the office) — See 
here, sir ! That check you sent me for my poem 
is no good ! 

Editor (coldly) — Neither was the poem. Shut 
the door, please. 

John — I hear, Jim, a boarder jumped his board 
at your house yesterday. 

Jim— Don't you believe it, John ; that was only 
a roomer. 

Fond Parent — I understand the Faculty is very 
much pleased with your work. 

Dropped Junior — Yes, they encored my Soph- 
omore year. 



•THE COLORADO RO*OT 




If you Want 



''OffiooASouwt'* 



T/>e 'Bc'St, 

The Quicks4:-t, 
The Mo^i 

Saii^ factory 



Line to Denver or Pueblo buy a Colo- 
rado & Southern Ticket. Get them at 
City Office, i ^ N. Tejon. 

J. H. SPRINGER, Commercial Agent. 
Come in and ask questions. 



THE TIGER 



13 



FresKmerk 

If you will call at 
our store we will 
be pleased to pre- 
sent you with a 

HANDSOME CARD CASE 


THE CRESCENT 

BOWLING ALLEYS 

115-117 North Cascade Ave. 

Telephone Main 863 


TheW. B. DAVIS CLOTHING & FUR- 
NISHING CO., 102 N. Tejon St. 


Private Alleys for Ladies 
Eight Alleys on one Floor 
Special Rates to Parties and Clubs 



Bookkeeping 

Shorthand 

Typewriting 



^- 



CENTRAL 



usiness 



Colle^^i 



College Estab- 
lished in 
Denver in 1887 



L. A. ARNOLD, Pres. J. C. CROY, Prin. 

Nichols Block, 18 and 20 S. Tejon St., 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Rooms inviting, ^ork Thorough, Teachers up-to-date 



Call or Write for Information. 



next 



You are next to a good hair cut or shave when you patronize 



The Manhattan Barber Shop, J. R. WEYMAR, Prop. 3o e. bijou 



WHITAKER & GARDNER 

30 N. TEJON ST. 

Headqtiarters for 

Golleqe Shoes 

OF EVERY DESCRIPTION 

We have the best mining and civil engineering boot 
in the market 

WHITAKER & GARDNER 




pm^^\ 



THE STAR is the leader for prompt 
and satisfactory service. 

SPECIAL RATES to students of col- 
lege and academy 

S. E. BENNETT, College Ag't. 



SEE OIR 
WINDOW 



College Pillow Tops 

7 Views. Best Souvenir or Gift Yet 

Ashford & Roberts 

126 N. Tejon St. 

15 per cent discouni to students on framing 



w. I. Luefls 



Columbia, Hartford, Rambler, Ideal & Tribune Bicycles 

The only first-class re' air shop in town. Chainless wheels 
a specialty. Wheels for rent. Phone 517- V. 1 29 N. Tejon 

Students Wishing a Special Course in Drawing, 

Water colors, Oil or China Paintings should call at 
ART STUDIO, io8 N. Tejon. MARION R. FORBISH, 

Member of Art Institute, Chicag;©. 



Every Stxiclef^t 

Buy Shoes where the Style and 
PRICES ARE RIGHT 



J IS ENTITLED to a 
/ 118 Soulh Tejon 



Special Discount on the best Shoes made at 

sf^^et R. A. HANDY SHOE CO. 



u 



THE TIGBR 



Colorado Coflege 



THE OLDEST INSTITUTION FOR 
HIGHER EDUCATION IN THE WEST 

FOUNDED AT COLORADO 
SPRINGS IN 1874 



Colorado College now offers advantages of the same 
grade as the best institutions. 

For information concerning Courses of -Study, Rooms 
and Board, Physical Culture, etc., apply to 

WM. F. SLOCUM, President, 
or EDWARD S. PARSONS, Dean. 

For information in regard to the College Department of 
Music, inquire of 

EDWARD S. PARSONS, Dean. 

Those wishing information as to the Courses in Drawing, 
Painting, Designing, etc., etc., inquire of 

EDWARD S. PARSONS, Dean. 

For information concerning the Engineering Depart- 
ment, apply to 

FLORIAN CAJORI, 
Dean of Engineering School. 



Cutler Academy 



Cutler Academy is the Associated Prepartory School of 
Colorado College, in which students are prepared for any 
American College. Address, 

M. C. GILE, Principal. 



THE TIGER. 



15 



The Albert Sechrist Manufacturing Co. 

WILL INSTALL GAS and 



1033 16th 
Street 



* 



ELECTRIC FIXTURES 

in your residence at Colorado Springs 
same price as Denver, without extra 
charge. Call and select your fixtures, 
or will send you a catalogue. 



DENVtR, 
tOIO. 




The Williafflson=Haffner 
Engraving Company 



1633 Arapahoe Street 



DENVER 



The 50-mile-an-hour Wheel 

Reading Standard Bicycles 



SaEFF & RIGGS: 



opposite Plaza Hotel 



Irerkins Croc/cerj/ Co. 

F. A. PERKINS, Manager 

120 7f. Vejon Si. 

^ V^a^ort Load of ^ ^ 

Ne^w Wood Type 

And OtHei* Mak.tet*i8cls 

O/" the -Very L,ate4!t at 
your "Di-spo^cLl _for 

Wirvdow Ca^rds 
Tickets, Flyers £££ 

E, J^ CRA V I JS^ G — ^ he rinest 

The Telegraph Job Rooms use, p. p. Ave. 

Ask wKere TKe Tiger Is Printed 



USE THE 
Colorado Midland 

in Going to 

Utah, 

California 

and the 

West 

Best Line to Colorado Points 

T)vo trains daily Den'ver to 
Salt Lake City 




C. H. SPEERS, 

G. P. A. 



H. C. BUSH 

Traffic Mgr. 

R. T. DUNAWAY, C. P. A 
Colorado Springs. 



JOHN MOFFAT 

Tine Cailoring 

Repairing, Cleaning, Pressing. Special rates to 

College Students 
Over Waiting's Book Store 16 South Tejon St. 

VEB WIING 



24 E. Kiowa St. 



Colorado Springs, Colo. 



NEW EMPIRE THEATRE 3 shows Daily ^^ \ Matinee 3 P. M. 

Evenings 7:30 and 8:45 



10C 



■VAUDEVILLE 



10C 



i6 



THE TIGBR 



El Paso Cleaning & Tailoring Co> Pressing 

10 E. Kiowa St. Phone Main 667=A Colo. Springs Cleaning 



Dyeing Altering 

Repairing Tailoring 



Prof. Chas. J. Hausdorf 

TEACHER OE MANDOLIN, bllTAR AND BANJO 

Music furnished for weddings, receptions, 

entertainments, etc. 

21 North Tejon. 



Office Phone 509-B 



Residence Phone Red 871 



DR. HARRY L. MOREHOUSE 



DENTIST 



Hours 9-12, 1:30-5 



First N tM Bank BIdg., room 8 



C. E. Arcularius & Co. 
Jewelers 

Diamonds and Watches 

Fine Jewelry Manufacturing 

9 South Tejon St. Colorado Springs 

The 

Crissey & Eowler Lumber 
Company 

Phone 101 117 to 123 West Vermrjo Ave. 



For 'Prompt atteniion. and Saiisfaciory 
Work, paironizi the 

IVIonarch Hand 
Laundry 

KARL L. IVIOHLER, Prop. 
W. J. WALLRICH, College Agt. 

A perfect fiUtng shirt necessitates hand %>ork 
Phone 540 329 E. Pikes Peak Ave. 

FINE CHOCOLATE BON BONS 



Name on every Piece 

Ice Cream, Hot and Cold 

Sodas 

Fresh Candies madeexery hour 



INION ICE AND COAL COMPANY 

W. M. BANNING, Prop. 




Coal, mood atid Tee 

Dealers in all kinds of Coal and Artificial and 
Natural Ice 

Yaid Office, 105 W. Vermijo Ave. City Office, 5 N. Tejon 




Moles and Superflous Hair removed with Electricity 
Hair Goods made to Order 

nirs^ Jltina Betbmaiit 

HAIR DRESSING PARLORS 

27 E. Kiowa Phone Red 394 Ladies Bath 

Colorado Springs, Colo. 



Carriages, Cabs, 

'Busses, Baggage and 

Transfer Wagons 

Office, 15 North eascade 



Denver Law School 

Law Department of the 
Lniversity of Denver 

Three years' course leading to the degree of 
Bachelor of Laws. Courses in Mining and Irri- 
gation Law. Full resident faculty. For informa- 
tion address 

LUCIUS W. HOYT, Dean 

Ernest & Cranmer BIdg., Denver, Colo. 

Old You Know 

That our stock of package crackers is so 
great in its variety that you could have a 
change for every day for more than two 
months and yet not exhaust our list? Well, 
it's a fact. We have a kind for every pos- 
sible time and occasion — and they are all 
good. Finest bakery goods in the city. 
Fancy Groceries 

W. N. BURGESS, 112 N. Tejon St. 

Titsworth & Davidson 
DAIRY 

2 MILES S. E. OE CQLORADO SPRINGS. P. 0. BOX 6 

The Honck'Davidson Coal and Transfer Co. 

Dealers In 

CANON CITY, MAITLAND 

AND LIGNITE COAL 

Phone 473-B. Office 118 N. Tejon. P. O. Box 275 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 



t oee 

t mi. 
♦ 

4* 

♦ 



^he G owdy-Simnvons Printing Company 

FOR WINDOW CARDS, TICKETS, ETC. ENGRAVED 
CARDS AND INVITATIONS ON SHORT NOTICE 



4.41414.4^41 4.4. 4i4» 

4» 
4» 

♦ 



2/ Tforih 
TJe/on <5V. 



eOTRELL St LEONftRD, 

♦ ALBANY. N. Y. 

t Makers of CAPS and GOWNS to American Col- 
leges and Universities from the Atlantic to 
the Pacific. Bulletin, samples, etc. 
upon application. 



4> 

4* 

4* 

4> 
4* 
4* 

♦ S. JAMES & SON, Props. 



THE DERN TEA AND COFFEE CO. 

Dealers in TEAS, COFFEES, SPICES, 
EXTRACTS, BAKING POWDERS, Etc. 



Phone 575 



29 S. Tejon St. 



The PeopIe^s Qtoczty a.nd Matket 



PHONE MAIN 868 




222 EAST PIKE'S PEAK 



Colorado Springs, Colorado 



4> 
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4* 

41 Telephone 13 



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ST, JOHN & BARNES 

Oldest and largest plumbing and heating 

establishment in city. Your 

patronage solicited 



206 N. Tejon St. 



* Phone Main 151 



Established 1897 



p. W. SMITH 

FAMILY GROCER, TEA AND 
COFFEE MERCHANT . : : : : 
Orders Called for and Promptly Delivered 

731 N. Weber St. Colorado Springs, Colo. 



112 Pike's Peak Ave. 



Telephone 230 



THE COLORADO SPRINGS 
FUEL COMPANY 

H. C. HARMON, Manager. 

Retailers of all the best grades of 

eOAL, eeKE, wood and eHAReOAL 

Exclusive Agency in Colorado Springs for all 
coal mined by the Colorado Fuel & Iron Co. 

The best Colorado Springs Lignite Coal for 
both domestic and steam use furnished promptly. 



For goodness Sake^^ 

Use TUDOR lower vein Coal 
It beats all other Lignite 

TUDOR COAL COMPANY, Cor. Cascade and Cucharas 

c/lsk your dealer for 

VICTOR 



Athletic 
Supplies 




The ©Id 
eurio Store 

Wholesale and Rotail 
Dealers in 

GENUINE INDIAN GOODS AND 
CURIOSITIES 

J. S. CANDELARIO, Prop., 

301 and 303 San Francisco Street, 

SANTA FE, N. M. 



DOVGI^AS eSi HSTHKILINGTON 

^rchifecf^ 

Phone 556-B Rooms 15-16 Outwest Building, Colorado Springs, Colo. 

4>4»«4>4*4»4>4*4»4>4'4*<f*4*4'4*4*4>4>4*4*4*4*4»4*4*4»«i*4>4»*i»*i*4»«i»*i>4*4»<i'4*^<l>4>«»<i> 



4» 4* ♦ ♦ 4* 4* ♦ ♦ 4* ♦ 



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♦ 4*4>4*4>4i4>4»4»4*4>4*4*4*4»4*4*4*4't*l'*i'^'»*i**i>4'4i4>4*4>«4>4* 

The Yoxxfig Nen^s Store* 

Yoxin^ Mcfv^s Overcoa^ts 

^OXPECTING a considerable increase of sales in this Depart- 
^ ment we start the season with a much larger and more ex- 
clusive stock of styles than ever before. 

All the leading styles worn by college men of the eastern 
colleges are represented in our fall lines. 



SPECIAL DISCOUNT 
TO STUDENTS 



Prices $10.00 to $25.00 

HOLBROOK & PERKINS 



THE DENVER FIRE CUY CO. 

MANUrACTURERS OF 
AND DEALERS IN 

Chemical and Physicial Apparatus and Chemicals 

A FULL LINE OF LABORATORY SUPPLIES AND ASSAY GOODS 
Write for Illustrated Catalogues 



•i> 1742-1746 Champa Street, 



DENVER, COLORADO 



Excellent u^hotoffraphs 

at BINGHAM & WOOD'S. 18 S. Tefon 

H. C COLBURN, Pres. E. A.COLBURN, Jt.,S«:'yandTfea». 

The^/Jntler^ ^yixitotnohile Co. 

LIVER.Y. STORAGE. REPAIRING 

Telephone Main 122 S-IO J<f, J^e-Oada A.'Oe. Colorado Springs, Colo, 




O. E. HEME3SP3I7AY 



Groceries and Meats 



us South Tejon St 
Colorado Springs, Colorado 



♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦4'4*4»4>4>4>4*«i>«l>«l'«l>4>4»4»4>4*4'4>4'4>««4>*»4>*|i4> 




\/2. 



<> ,-^ .- '' /^ 



\ i-r-^p- 



im TIGCR 




0CT0BE:R 13tH, 1904 



voL\/MB vn. 



J^umber-^ ^ 




♦ 

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♦ ♦4*4'4*«»4*4>4>4>4>4>4*4>4*4>4*4*4*4>4'4» 

Special Kates to Students 

On Rented Pianos 




The KNIGHT ^eHMPBELL 
Music (Zompany 



Mew Lennox Block 



Opposite North Park 



St. John Bros.r"'"'™'"' 

Gas and Steam Fitters 

Hot Water Heating a Specialty 

Prompt attention given to Repair Work. 

Curtis Goal go> 

Office 132 N. Teion St. Telephone 91. 

Try ''NEW RANGE" for the Kitchen, $4.00. 
BITUMNOUS COAL AT STANDARD PRICES. 

SELDOMRIDGE BROTHERS, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

Flour, Feed, Grain, Hay and Seeds 

108 South Tejon Street 

Repairing while You Wait Satisfaction Guaranteed 

A complete plant of New Machinery for 
the Manufacture of Fine Boots and Shoes 

The Lightning Shoe Shop 

BROWN & COMPANY 
We make a specialty of Shoes to Measure and Shoes for 
Cripples. 28H North Tejon St. Coloeado Speings 

Visiting Cards in Latest Styles. 



WE SHOW 
YOU. 



By advertising in THE TIGER tiiat we 
appreciate your custom. 

22 1. Kiowa St. The Prompt Printerj 



The 

Hassell iron Works Co. 



rounders and Machinists 



********************** 

TOe lOeicome 

THE STUDENTS, 
new and old, at our studio. 

Corner Cascade and Kiowa 




THUM j 



Dealer in Kodaks and Supplies. 



COLLEGE GOWNS, CAPS 

The Best Workmanship 
at Lowest Prices 

Silk Faculty Gowns and Hoods 




COX SONS & VININfi 

262 Fourth Avenue., NEW YORK 



F00T BALLS 

Pants, Nose Guards, 
Tennis Goods 
and Sweaters 



at Strangs 

119 North Tejon Street 



Mueth's 

Soda, Ice 6ream 

eATERING 

CHAS. T. FERTIG 

'^a.l Estate, Loans and Insurance 

29 N. Tejon Street 

XJhe Colorado Springs Jftorai Co* 

FLORISTS 



/O^ ^mrM TTm/om cIVtrw*/ 



DOVGLAS ea HBTHSRINGTON 

^rchitect4: 



^ Phone 556-B Rooms 15-16 Outwest Building, Colorado Springs, Colo. 



THB TIGER. 



Student's Book Store Books, stationery; an Engi- 

. neer's Supplies; College Pins 

and Watch Fobs. Century Fountain Pens $1 to $4, Waterman's $2.50 

""^ "P- REYER & PUTT. 

Eor $1 00 D6r month ' ^"'^ sponged and Pressed each week 

— ^ PANTATORIIM. 

17 East Bijou, Branch Office opp. Plaza Hotel. 



THE COLORADO SPRINGS CO. 

The Original Locators of 

Colorado Springs and 97fanitou 

is still offering for sale choice 
lots on North Weber Street 
and North Wahsatch Avenue 

Also lots for sale in other parts of Colorado Springs 
and in Manitou 

Apply at ROOMS, OUTWEST BUILDING 

LOUIS STOeK steam aye and Cleaning 

Office and Works, US N. Tejon St. 
TELEPHONE 517-B 

Cleaning, Dyeing, Sconring in all its branches 
Ostrich Plumes Cleaned, Dyed and Curled 
Kid Gloves Dyed and Cleaned, 

GIDDINGS BROS. 

fine dress goods and ladies' 
Tailor Suits, Ladies' 
^"^ Furnishings 

Kiowa and Tejon Streets. 

CHARLES P. BENNETT 

Real Estate, Loans 
and Insurance*^ ^ 

NO. 5 PIKE'S PEAK AVENUE 

D. E. MONROE & CO. 
Prescription Druagist 

The best of Drugs, Stationery and Toilet Articles 

NO LIQUORS SOLD. 
Cor. Teion Sf Bifou Phone 311 Sf 331 

THE HEFLEY-ARCULARIIS DRIG CO. 
Druggists 

Kodaks, Cameras and all kinds of Photographic 
Supplies. Developing and Printing for Amatuers. 
Free Delivery. 
Phone 144 21 South Tejon Street 



liardwarc Bicycles 

a. S. BLSKE 

New Chainless Bicycle $35 and $20 

Rambler, Orient and National Automobiles 

Best Repair Shop in city 107 n. refon 

nir$« l^« R. brooks 

Coilct Parlors at 20 east Hioiva 

Also Room 52, Antlers Hotel 

No Apprentices. Only experienced help employed. 





PARK BAKERY "^^ 

Finest Coffee and Lunch Room in the City 
J. SCHACrCR, Prop., Colorado Springs, Colo. 

HENRY TAMR^ 

Druggist 

PRESCRIPTIONS 
TOILET ARTICLES 
STATIONERY 

All Popular Drinks Served 
at our Soda Fountain 

Plaza Hotel, Cor. Cache la Poudre & Tejon Sts. 

THE RUOBMRIMROSE COAL CO. 



All Kinds of Fuel 



Phone 481- A 



West 44-A 



21 N. TEJON ST. 



H.KRAAz p©ReELaiiv 

H. KRANZ & 

Only 8 Chair Barber Shop in the City 
lOdH B. Pike*s Peak Ave. 



F. R. SMITH 



BATH TUBS 

e©., Barbers 

Try the i lectric Vibrassage Macltine 
eGLORADO SPRINGS. e©L©* -V^- 



THE TIGBR. 



When in doubt , take the safe side. 

SEND BUNDLES TO THE 

Colorado Springs Laundry 

Est. 20 yrs. Ralph Rice. College Agt. 



Use Gas 



We sell a GOOD FOUNTAIN PEN for $1 

WHITNEY & GRIMWOOD 

Opera House Building 

We are agents for WATERMAN'S IDEAL FOUNTAIN 
PENS. Prices from $2.50 up. 



^red S. J^aj/ner 

Watchmaker and Jeweler 

15 South Zjsy'on St. 




AND 



lOOOWORTH 



/:\. 



ioRracoLL^"^; 



1739 Champa St., DENVER, COLO. 



C. W. WARSOP & CO.. 



205 N. Tejon St. 



Draperies, Upholstery Goods, Furniture. Complete line of Screens, 
Pillows, Pillow Tops, Couch Covers, etc. 



The 



Denver 






Denver 



FRANK E. CRIMP 

FLORIST 

Phone 500 5og E. Columbia St. 

Special attention given to Telephone Orders. 



H. E. BOATRIGHT 

^ubiic Stenographer 

33 GIDDINGS BLDG. 
Rates 5c per 100 words, 50c per hr. extra carbons 5c per page 



The eox Shoe eo. 

107 S. Tejon St. Colorado Springs, Colo. 



J. M. e©x 



LADIES, MISSES AND CHILD- 
REN'S SHOES 

MEN'S, YOUTHS' AND BOYS' 
SHOES 



FRANK H, SMALL watches, Diamonds, fine Watch Work. Special 

113 Pike's Peak Ave. 



Jeweler and Silversmith P^i^^ to Students. 



Vhe TIOCR 



Vol. VII. 



COLORADO COLLEGE, OCTOBER 13, 1904. 



No. 5 



COLLEGE TRADITIONS 



Each college or university of any age or stand- 
ing has its own peculiar life, resembling in many 
ways the life in other institutions, yet having its 
traits which are distinct from those of other 
schools. There are stories of life in some univer- 
sities which have become almost classics in our 
literature — notably "Tom Brown at Oxford." Re- 
cently a series of books has been begun which is 
to give a picture of life in our American uni- 
versities. If the student of Colorado College will 
read these books, he can scarcely help seeing that 
there is something which he is missing, which 
he might get at these universities. The writer 
would not advise a general exodus of students to 
schools whose life has become crystalized, but 
an attempt on the part of all in Colorado College 
to make the life here what it should and can be. 
Traditions can not be made in a day, nor a 
year, but they can grow slowly. One of the most 
interesting in our College is the Barbecue on 
Halowe'en which is always managed by the 
Sophomores. This is an event long to be re- 
membered by any one who has attended it, or 
helped to manage it. Each year the preparations 
become more elaborate. The feature of the even- 
ing most enjoyed is the blanket tossing of the 
under-classmen by the Juniors. 

The Junior class has an additional responsibil- 
ity thrust upon it, in the editing of the College 
Annual. The excitement which pervades the 
whole school on the day of the appearance of the 
"Nugget" is scarcely equalled by that of a tenth 
innmg in a deciding championship game. The 
grave and dignified Senior is supposed to rest 
from his labors, and well does he perform what is 
expected of him. He becomes so frolicsome 
that in the last month of his College course he 
must needs play before audiences amazed that 
such histrionic talent could have been before their 
eyes, lo, these many months, without being dis- 
covered before. The cap and gown tends to add 
tc the high standing of the highest class, while 
the class shirt (to be worn only by Seniors) keeps 
them from becoming too prudish. Unfortunately 
this latter custom has been allowed to decay. It 
ii to be hoped that the present Seniors will not 
let any custom which has become a distinct 
feature of Colorado College life, fall into disuse. 
Some years ago our debaters, on their return 
fiom Lincoln, brought with them a cap of black 



and gold which became known as the debaters' 
cap. Unfortunately the following debating teams 
did nothing to preserve this emblem of honor 
which should be more precious to a student than 
a football C. If the men who engage in athletic 
contests for the honor of the College are allowed 
a badge to distinguish them from the common 
herd, how much more should not the men who 
enter intellectual contests. 

Just at present the College is in the throes of 
transition from a state of anarchy to a state of 
some sort of respect for, or at least fear of law. 
It has had some traditions which have needed 
some revision, at least. The committee from the 
four classes has drawn up a set of resolutions 
which have not met with the approval of all. Some 
years ago somewhat similar conditions were met, 
and an attempt at the solution of the problem of 
class spirit was made by having regulated class 
contests. However, these were not satisfactory, 
and consequently were abandoned, wath a natural 
relapse to previous conditions. 

It may be interesting to the reader to see what ' 
was done at Princeton to prevent friction between 
the two lower classes. After condemning in 
strong terms the custom of hazing, the resolutions 
propose the following method of abolishing it: 

T. At the first meeting of the freshman class, 
the chairman of the committee hereinafter pro- 
vided for, shall announce that while the senti- 
ment of the college is opposed to hazing, yet the 
members of the freshman class will be expected 
to observe the following college customs : 

1. Freshmen are prohibited from wearing 
Princeton colors in town. 

2. Freshmen shall not wear golf trousers, fe- 
doras, horse hats or monogram caps ; nor shall 
they wear straw hats before the third- Saturday in 
May. 

2. No duck trousers shall be worn by freshmen 
until the day of the first Georgetown baseball 
game. 

4. Freshmen are not allowed to smoke pipes 
cntside of their rooms. 

5. Freshmen are not allowed to enter the grand- 
stand at the varsity field unless accompanied by 
visitors. 

6. Freshmen must not be in the streets after 
9 o'clock at night until after Washington's birth- 
day. 



THE TIGBR. 



7. Freshmen are not allowed to enter any saloon 
or pool room except the Nassau. 

8. Freshmen are not allowed to play ball or 
loaf on the campus unless accompanied by a mem- 
ber or members of one of the upper classes. 

9. No freshman shall carry a cane in town. 

10. The highest class has the right of way on all 
sidewalks. 

11. It shall be understood that aside from an 
insistence of the above specified college customs, 
by the processes hereinafter provided for, any 
molestation or intimidation or dictation to the 
m.embers of the freshman class on the part of 
the sophomores shall be considered hazing. 

III. Members of all classes shall have the right 
tc appeal to the committee hereinafter provided 
for, for the enforcement of these resolutions, in- 
cluding an observance of the customs specified 
in any particular instance that may come before 
their notice. 

IV. There shall be a committee composed of 
the following five persons : The vice presidents 
of the two upper classes, the editor-in-chief of 
the Princetonian, and the manager' and assistant 
manasrer of the baseball team. The duties of this 
committee shall be : 

1. They shall decide all questions arising in the 
interpretation of these resolutions. 

2. They shall summon before them all members 
of the freshman class who are accused of violating 
the terms of these resolutions, investigate the 
charges brought against them, and, if found guilty, 
shall decide upon the punishment to be inflicted. 

Such an elaborate set of rules would not fit 
the conditions here, but something may be sug- 
gested by these which would be of value to us. 



THINK ABOUT IT. 

The following from the New York Tribune 
h an extract from a lecture on "The Develop- 
ment of the Reflective Powers" given by Pro- 
fessor Frank M. McMurray before the Brooklyn 
Institute : 

"If the student believes that all he has to do to 
be educated is to learn the thoughts of other peo- 
ple, he will certainly never develop the power to 
think. With all the new education, and with 
all the discussion of pedagogic methods and 
problems, three-fotirths of the college students 
of the day suppose memorizing to be the chief 
end and aim of a college education. 

Pupils should be led to know that they have 
not properly mastered any statement in their text 
books until it ha.» brought up a train of related 
thoughts. This habit of reflection, once thor- 
oughly fixed will follow the student into every 
line of study. 

"I find that college students do not know the 
interpretation ot the most familiar stories and 



parables of the Bible. They can repeat the 
stories, but they have never thought enough to 
appreciate the significence or meaning of them. 
Take the story of the ProdigaJ Son, for instance. 
I have found few college students who could get 
any signification out of that, or any practical ap- 
plication. They had simply never thought about 
ir a^ all. The best part of all the great writings 
of the world is not in them. Take the conversa- 
tion of Jesus with the woman at the well ; prob- 
ably the greatest bit of conversation ever re- 
ported. The thought that makes it the greate-st 
conversation that ever took place is not expressed 
a< all. It comes into the mind of the reader, as 
the inevitable result of what he has read. He 
who has not conceived this thought has missed 
the whole point, although he may both have 
comprehended and memorized the words of the 
text. 

"All the classics depend for their power more, 
on the related thoughts they arouse than on 
their actual statements. That is the reason we 
try to visualize them; read Shakespeare with 
dictionaries, reference books, histories — to get 
out of it first all the writer put in — to build up 
the words into a mental picture. And then we 
get out of the text thoughts that are not there at 
all ; thoughts that are roused in our minds by 
the pregnant words of the author. The test of 
great writings is the power to set such trains 
of thought in motion. 

"I am afraid few of us could agree with the 
rule that we should never give more time to the 
reading of a book than we do to reflection on its 
contents. Many readers do not allow the frenzied 
current pouring through the eye to be checked 
by the slightest driftwood of thought from the 
brain within. In my own work with college 
students I don't find more than half of them 
who know how to reflect on what they read- — 
how to get anything out of it that isn't in black 
and white before them. 

"Merely understanding and retaining is an ex- 
tremely passive kind of work. Constructive 
mental work consists in overhauling the whole 
subject in one's own mind, getting its relations, 
its bearings, to what we know and what we don't 
know. 

Herbert Spencer once said that he supposed 
he would not know any more than some other 
people if he read as much as they did. 



"Oh, my!" sighed Mr. Grubb's extravagant 
wife. "I do wish we had lots of money. Don't 
you?" 

"Well," replied her hard working husband, "I 
certainly do wish I had all the money I would 
have spent during the ten years of our married 
life if we had lived up to your ideas." — Philadel- 
phia Press. ■ 



THE TIGER. 



ORATORICAL ASSOCIATION. 



PIKE'S PEAK OR BUST. 



At a meeting of the Oratorical and Debating 
association last week, the amendments to the 
constitution which had been proposed were 
passed, and an assessment of fifteen cents is to 
be levied on all members of the College. In the 
past years the students have objected to the fre- 
quency of the assessments but this year there will 
be only two — the present one and another about 
I wo weeks before the interstate debate. The 
state oratorical contest will be here this year 
and so our delegates will have no expenses, but 
there will be certain advertising expenses, and 
this present assessment is to procure money to 
meet the current expenditures of the associa- 
tion. To bring the debating team from Utah, 
i^ will be necessary to raise $ioo, and it is 
hoped that everyone will bear this in mind and 
if anyone feels particularly flush or generous 
that he will give the association five dollars 
for this fund. Now don't wait to be asked ^o 
pay this money but look up the officers and pay 
them. Mr. Muffley and Mr. Bartlett will collect 
from the Freshman and Sophmore classes and 
Mr. Givens from the Juniors and Seniors. 

Don't forget about this matter, for the siim 
is asked from each one, and the association stands 
in active need of the money. This is your asso- 
ciation, the men who enter the contests under 
its charge are the College representatives, your 
representatives and so take an interest in this 
work, it is a feature of the College life, the 
same as athletics or anything else, and if the 
students will take an interest in this kind of 
work the oratorical and debating side of the 
College life can be made as interesting as any 
other. So greet the men pleasantly when they 
come around and give them fifteen cents. 



CALENDAR. 



Friday, October 14. 

4 p. m., Minerva Apollonian Club House 

4:30 p. m., Hypatia Cutler Academy 

5 p. m., Contemporary Ticknor Study 

7 p. m., Y. M. C. A Ticknor Study 

7:30 p. m., Apollonian Club House 

7 .30 p. m., Pearsons Cutler Academy 

Saturday, October 15. 

Morning — Annual Geological excursion up 
Pike's Peak; $2.00 round trip from Manitou. 

Afternoon — Football, Tigers vs. Sacred Heart 
College, at Denver. 

_./.. Sunday, October 16. 

4 p. m., Y. M. C. A., Apollnian, Club House. 



The annual geological excursion up Pike's 
Peak comes next Saturday, October 15. This is 
the most popular excursion of the year, as the 
rate for the round trip from Manitou is reduced 
Lo $2.00 from the regular fare of $5.00. If there 
i.. any student in College who has not enjoyed 
the splendid view from the top of the Peak he 
should not fail to go next Saturday. Several 
who have made the trip before have expressed 
the intention of going again this year. 

It is necessary that there be at least fifty on 
the excursion in order to secure the rate. If you 
intend going, please hand your names to Dr. 
Finlay before Friday noon. 



Why not start a Chess club? There is plenty 
of material in school to have an interesting 
tournament. Then perhaps we would get a 
tournament with some other school, or at least 
with the city Y. M. C. A. If we win, hurrah 
for us ! if we lose, we learn something of the 
most scientific game there is. Those interested 
see Horn. 



Pickle — In order to guard against accidents in 
the smelters, there are numerous signs of warn- 
ing, particularly this one : "Look out for the slag 
trains." 

O'Dea — If slag were reversed it would be a 
ball room : "Look out for the gals' trains." 



"I don't recall seeing you at college. I guess 
you must have been before my time." 

"Possibly; possibly. Who was the head of 
the faculty when you were there?" 

"Um — let me see. I don't just recall his name, 
but I was there the year Bruce played halfback 
and kicked goal twice from the field in the last 
half of—" 

"Oh, sure ! Of course ! That was the year our 
center rush carried most of the opposing team 
on his back for a gain of thirty yards. Yes, in- 
deed. I wonder who was president then. I don't 
seem to remember minor details of college life 
myself." 

Fields — What makes you think that Limburger 
cheese is the best? 

Alfs — Well, it is cured before it comes to this 
country. 

Fields — Gee, it must get a terrible relapse when 
i'. reaches this side. 

At West Point 90 per cent, of the cadets are 
members of the Young Men's Christian Associa- 
tion, and 40 per cent of them are carrying on 
work in the weekly Bible classes. 



THE TIGBR. 



THE TIGER 

Published weekly during the College year by 
The; Tiger Publishing Co., in the interest of Colo- 
rado College. 

J. Y. Crothers Editor-in-Chief 

T. Hunter Assistant Editor-in-Chief 

J. I. Muffley Athletic Editor 

Miriam Carpenter Literary Editor 

Mabel Barbee Alumni Editor 

A. H. Fisher Local Editor 

Bert Wasley Business Manager 

C. A. Hedblom .... Assistant Business Manager 

CORRESPONDENTS: 

Mr. Nash, Miss McDowell, Miss Isham, Miss 
Kidder, Mr. Lamb, Mr. Reeks, Miss Arbuckle. 

Subscription, $1.25 per year, payable in advance. 
Single copy, 5 cents. 

The: Tiger is forwarded to all subscribers until 
ordered discontinued and all arrearanges are paid. 

Students, Professors and Alumni are invited 
to contribute literary articles, personals and items. 
Contributions must be accompanied by the writer's 
name. 

Address all communications to The Tiger, 
Colorado College, Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Entered at the Postoffice at Colorado Springs, 
Colo., as second-class matter. 



Patronize Tiger Advertisers 



EDITORIAL 



SATURDAY'S GAME. 



T^HERE was a marked improvement last Satur- 
day in every feature of the game except that 
observed by the weather man. Despite the for- 
bidding condition of the weather there was a 
goodly number of students to see the game, and 
the steady rain did not dampen their spirits 
either. The rooting was a pleasing contrast to 
that in former games this year. The Academy 
boys are especially to be commended on the snap 
with which they gave the yells. The Rooters' 
Club is a good thing — push it. Hard work seems 
to agree with the Tigers, for they played much 
better than at any previous time this year. With 
the present improvement kept up we will be in 
a more comfortable position at the end of this 
season than we have been for several years. Be- 
cause we are patting you on the back, do not 
think that your work is done. We shall have 
the hardest game of the season the last of this 



month, and to win it means consistent, hard 
work from every member of the squad for three 
weary weeks, and enthusiastic support from every 
member of the student body for the same time. 
When you see a football man, tell him you ex- 
pect him to win that game. You may be sure, 
then, he will do his part. 



ALUMNI NOTICE. 

T^HE Alumni Editor wishes to have the atten- 
tion of all the Alumni called to their de- 
partment of the Tiger. It is realized that every 
year there are more of you who are interested 
in the present life of the College, and in those 
who have been here in other days. The attempt 
is made each year to have this department take 
a more prominent part than before, but this is 
very difficult without a hearty co-operation on 
the part of all former students of the College. 
You are one and all are requested to send the 
Tiger any items of interest about yourself or 
any of your friends among the students of other 
days. 



OUR EXCHANGE. 

The students will find the Tiger exchanges 
ir the room formerly occupied by the Book 
club, up stairs in Coburn Library. It is a good 
thing to keep in touch with student life at large, 
and this can be done most easily by reading the 
student publications. The exchanges are kept 
there for you to read. If there is some school 
whose paper you would like especially to see, just 
tell the editor about it. We shall be glad to try 
to get an exchange with any paper you are in- 
terested in. But, by the way, mail addressed 
to The Tiger is not supposed to be opened by 
those who are not on the Board. We notice 
that mail that is opened by outsiders rarely 
reaches its proper destination. We hope this 
doesn't mean you, but if it does, kind reader, 
please do not be so thoughtless again. 

The Freshman class showed last Saturday 
that it is catching the college spirit. The class 
attended the game in a body, distributed printed 
songs and yells throughout the grandstand, and 
did the most effective rooting. Keep it up, it is 
the proper spirit. 

It was proven beyond doubt last Saturday that 
we have a good team. Every fellow is doing his 
best, the championship and that flag are real 
bright possibilities. The team will win and let 
us all give it our support and share in the vic- 
tories. 



THB TIGER 



SATURDAY'S SKIRMISH. 

The High School Was Expecting an Easy vic- 
tory, But Won by the Small Score of 5 to o. 

The practice game with C. S. H. S. Saturday 
was quite an eyeopener for the Academy. We 
have a good bunch of material that hard, con- 
sistent work will round out into a fine team. The 
work of Allebrand, Tuttle, Graham, Haight and 
McRae is especially to be commended. Kurie 
i,-5 more severely injured than was at first thought 
and Graham and Tuttle are both slightly hurt 
but will be in the game Saturday. The schedule 
is at last arranged and we play Central here 
Saturday; C. S. H. S. plays Centennial at Pu- 
eblo. 

Let us see every Academy student on the field 
Saturday supporting the team and the team will 
do its best for the Academy. 



FOOTBALL SCORES LAST WEEK. 



-State University, 24; Denison 



-Ames, 17; State Normal, o. 
Tenn. — Vanderbilt, 66; Georgia 



At Columbus 
University, o. 

At Ames, la. 

At Nashville, 
University, o. 

At Des Moines — Iowa university, 17; Drake, o 

At Philadelphia — University of Pennsylvania, 
24; Lehigh, o. 

At Annapolis — Midshipmen, 12; Virginia Mili- 
tary Acadamy, o. 



At Hanover, N. H. — Dartmouth, z? 'y Univer- 
city of Vermont, o. 

At Ithaca — Cornell, 34 ; Hamilton, o. 

At Williamsport — Carlisle Indians, 10; Buck- 
nell, 4. 

At Cambridge — Harvard, 23 ; University of 
Maine, o. 

At West Point— Cadets, 18; Dickinson, o. 

At Minneapolis — Minnesota, 35; North Da- 
kota, o. 

At Ann Arbor — Michigan, 95, Kalamazoo col- 
lege, o. 

At Princeton — Princeton, 16; Washington and 
Jefferson, o. 

At Syracuse — Colegate University, 11; Syracuse 
University, o. 

At Bloomington — Indiana, 12 ; Kentucky, o. 

At Birmingham — University of Alabama, 20; 
Tuskegee, o. 

At New York — Columbia, 11; Williams, o. 

At Greencastle — DePauw, 18; Indiana State 
Normal, o. 

At North Denver High school, 29; East Den- 
ver High school, o. 

At Longmont — Longmont High school, o; West 
Denver High school, 35. 

At Loveland — Loveland High school, o; 
Boulder Preps, 22. 

At Madison, Wis. — Wisconsin, 2)?)\ Marquette 
College, o. 

At Fort Collins — Agricultural College, 16; 
Sacred Heart, Denver, o. 

At Boulder — University of Colorado, 6; Uni- 
versity of Nebraska, o. 




^ ^fi 4f4f4F4f4f^f4 f ^F4F4f4F^ 



ATHLETIC 
DEPARTMENT 

C. C. 5— D. U. 0. 



The Tigers are alright. They demonstrated to 
the large audience that assembled on Washburn 
Field last Saturday that the "Tiger Spirit" is still 
alive and when the proper occasion arrives that 
it can still win victories for Old C. C. 

Denver University was our antagonist and she 
met a complete and decisive defeat. They came 
down confident that their weight and Boulder 
coaching would be too much for the Tigers, but 



ere the game was one minute old, Denver's hopes 
had gone glimmering. They were out-played at 
every stage of the game, and but for the heavy 
field caused by a steady rain, would have been 
overwhelmed by a large score. 

It was a case of muscle and brawn against 
science and grit, for Denver outweighted the Col- 
lege both in the line and the back-field, but the 
speed and science of the College prevented Den- 



Si 



THM TIGUR 



ver's making any consistent gains. Only twice 
during the game did she make first downs. The 
wet field was a great hinderance to the fast play 
of the Tigers and although the ball was all the 
time in D. U.'s territory the touchdown was not 
made until the second half. Then fierce line 
plunging carried the ball 35 yards for the touch- 
down. 

It was a good hard game in which every man 
on the College team played superbly and it speaks 
well for a successful season. The game passed 
off nicely. There was no show of feeling ex- 
cept when Coach Fowler went on the field to 
question a decision. He soon retired seeminngly 
satisfied after Rishards had addressed to him a 
few terse, forcible sentences. 

The College won the toss and chose to de- 
fend the north goal. Denver kicked off to the 
20-yard line and Mack returned the ball twenty 
yards. Hill went through tackle for three and 
Seybold behind splendid interference went around 
left end for twenty-five. The grandstand led by 
the Freshmen class was doing some great root- 
ing. Hill tried right end but was thrown for a 
loss and on a fake kick Mack made 15 yards be- 
ing run out of bounds. Mack hit the line for five 
and five. Right here Denver began to wake up 
and by a supreme effort forced Hill to punt. The 
ball rolled over the line and Denver punted from 
the 25-yard line. Seybold carried the ball back 
20 yards. Nead went through tackle for three 
and Lennox skirted left end for 5 yards. Mack 
went against guard for 3 and Seybold made 4 
through tackle. Hill tried right end for no 
gain and from the 40-yard line Lennox tried a 
place kick, but the ball went wide. Nead re- 
covered the ball and touched it down but it went 
tc D. U. who punted to the College 50-yard line. 
Nead ran the ball back 15 yards. Mack could not 
budge center and on the next play Nead fumbled. 
On the first play the i igers were penalized 5 
yards for being' offside. Now for the first time 
Denver got the ball. E. Pate tried right end but 
stopped very suddenly and Yundt had a similar 
experience at Captain Lennox's end. The Col- 
lege was again penalized for offside play. Pate 
on a quarter-back run made 5 yards, but Yundt 
and E. Pate could not gain. E. Pate punted to 
Lennox who was downed in his tracks. Seybold 
lost his interference and was thrown behind the 
line. Fawcett made 5, but Hill was forced to 
punt. Pate returned the ball to the 25-yard line. 
E. Pate and Yundt hit the line in vain and Elliott 
punted to Randolph on the College 50-yards line. 
Hill made three and Seybold one and it was Den- 
ver's ball. On the first play L. Lennox tackled 
Pate for a loss of 5 yards and the first half 
was over. 

In the second half Nead kicked off to Pate 



whom Lennox immediately downed. Pate made 
no gain and Elliott could do no better. Elliott 
punted to Randolph who made 8 yards. Seybold 
skirted left end for 12 and Hill tore up tackle 
for 3 but on the next play the tackle was im- 
movable. Seybold skirted left end for eight but 
Hill and Mack could not budge the line. Randolph 
laid down flat to hold the ball for Lennox's place 
kick, but dashed around left end for 18 yards. 
P was close to the required distance but Denver 
got the ball on her own 20-yard line. McNutt 
made three yards and Yundt lost 3. Denver 
punted to Randolph who by skillful dodging made 
18 yards through a broken field, Seybold failed 
to gain and Hill made three yards. Mack made 
15 yards and Morgan who replaced Seybold made 
5 and 5. Here Denver held but could not gain 
and attempted to punt but Howbert broke 
through, blocked the punt and fell on the ball on 
Denver's 25-yard line. Now began the march to 
victory. The plays were all directed against the 
line. Morgan made 3 through center and Mack 
hit guard for 5 and i ; Morgan made 5 and Nead 
ploughed through for 5, Mack made 2 and Mor- 
gan 2 ; Hill dived for three and Morgan made 
four. The ball was two feet from the goal and 
Mack was hurled through the line for a touch- 
down. Lennox missed the goal. Denver o; 
C. C. 5. 

Denver kicked to Johnston who replaced Ran- 
dolph at quarter. Morgan made 5 yards and 
Mack made 4. Morgan made 3 and Hill i and 
3 but on the next play the little half was caught 
for a loss. Hill made a good punt from a difficult 
pass. Pate could not advance the ball but Manly 
made 5 yards. Pate got his signals wrong so 
could not give the ball away but decided to try 
i himself and to the surprise of everybody 
dashed around left end for 25 yards. On the 
next play Fisher caught his man for a loss and 
Hedbloom spoiled Manley's run by tackling him 
behind the line. The half ended with the ball in 
midfield. 

The line-up : 
C. C— D. U.— 

Bale c Foley 

Hedblom 1. g Elliott 

Fawcett-Mosteller r. g Martin 

Howbert 1. 1 Morse 

Nead r. t Alter 

W. Lennox-Fisher. . . . 1. e Manley-Coberly 

L. Lennox (c) r. e Sabin 

Randolph- Johnston. . . .g A. Pate 

Seybold-Morgan r. h. b Yundt-Manley 

Mack f. b McNutt 

Hill 1. h.b E. Pate 

Umpire, Dawson ; Referee, Richards ; Timer, 
Armstrong; Linemen, Hawke (D. U.) and Lake 
(C. C.) ; Halves, each 20 minutes. Attendanc-^, 
1,000. 



THE TIGER. 



ALUMNI NOTES. 



Professor Hills is a real loyal. During the 

whole game he stood on the side lines in the 

Josephine Work, ex-'o6, was recently elected rain and saw the Tigers wallop that Denver Uni- 

president of the Senior class at the Greeley Nor- versity team that plays Boulder football. 

mal. , 
Mr. and Mrs. Whiton, of Pueblo, spent several 

days last week visiting their daughter. 



Pearl Cooper is studying for the Master's 
degree at Leland Stanford. 

Hugh McLean, 'oi, is a second year law student 
at Harvard. 

Ruth Brush, ex-'o2, will graduate from the 
Greeley Normal next June. 

Homer Reed, '04, was in town for the game 
last Saturday. 

Wm. Leighton, 04, is teaching at Harford, 
Conn., in Stearns' private preparatory for Yale. 

Ruth Lewis, '04, is tutoring in Canon City. 

Lois Crane, ex-'o6, leaves soon for Cascade 
where she will teach this winter. 

Evelyn Shuler, ex-'o7, is in town visiting her 
aunt, Mrs. Hayden. 

Walter and Jackson (ex-hausteds) wall spend 
the next two weeks in St. Louis. 

F. C. Sager, '03, was about College this week. 
"Band-Box Freddie" says he enjoys ranch life. 



TIGER NOTES. 

Albert has left school to take charge of a gen- 
eral merchandise store at Wellington. 



Dr. and Mrs. Workman, of Pueblo, visited 
their niece, Miss Weaver, last Rriday. 

One of the girls has been studying Spaulding'.-: 
football guide. 

Mr. Porter, of Denver, visited his daughters 
on Sunday. They spent the day at Bear Creek 
canon. 

The Senior girls of Ticknor Hall voted the 
Freshman party a success. 

German B was treated to a cut on Monday. 

Did the Sophs stop the Freshman party? Not 
much ! 

They have learned better in Denver ! 

Here's to the Rooters' Club ! May it live long 
and prosper ! 

Boulder won from Nebraska, but — ! 

Math B had a distinguished visitor Monday. 

In Hist. A "He divided his men and then sub- 
divided them." 

Miss Baker, '07, and Miss Fowler, '08, spent 
Saturday and Sunday in Denver. 



Billy Johnston was injured slightly at practice 
Tuesday night. He expects to be in the game night, 
again soon. 



The halls were favored by a serenade Saturday 



English S realized Wednesday afternon how lit- 
tle they knew. 

The College Bowlers rolled their highest scores 
in their last game, getting two over 200. The 
standing in the City Leagues is now 500 per 
cent. 



Speech ! Speech ! Speech ! 

"What's the matter with Miss Gould?" 

Did Lake step into a water hole? 

The Freshmen had their election Monday after 
chapel and elected the following officers : H. 
Sill, persident ; W. Currier, vice president ; Miss 
R. Aitken, 'secretary and treasurer ; McLean, 



Our rivals at Boulder had the greatest day in 
their football history last Saturday when the sargeant-at-arms 
hasky Nebraska team met defeat on Gamble 
Field. We wish to congratulate Boulder on th^ 
'unique" accomplishment. It pleases us greatly in a body and did their share of rooting 

for now we shall have at least one competitor this 

year that is worthy of our steel. 



The Freshmen attended the game last Saturdav 



Anderson was in Canon City Thursday. 



tc 



ThB TICBR 



We notice some "waddlers" in the D. U. bunch. 

'08 watch fobs are in evidence. 

Minerva is planning to give a farce about the 
last of November. 

The Sophomores have begun to prepare for 
the Barbecue. The big event will be held as usual, 
Monday evening, October 31, on Washburn Field. 
Come onCj come all. 

Several Freshmen visited the field meet and 
one of them got into trouble by wearing the 
wrong colors. Unfortunately he wandered into 
the wrong part of the grandstand. He finally 
made his escape, minus a hat. 

Miss G (in Economics A) — "Woman has al- 
ways had a hard time." 

Messrs Sill and Currier took supper at Ticknor, 
and Mr. McCreery at Montgomery, Saturday. 

The Freshman party was a quiet affair. 

The boys had a splendid yell practice in the 
Chemistry lecture room last week. 

The College had the pleasure of a visit from 
Miss Helen Gould last Monday afternoon. Miss 
Gould is making a tour of the country, visiting es- 
pecially the railroad Y. M. C. A.'s which are do- 
ing a noble work. The railroad employes ex- 
press a sincere appreciation of her interest in 
them. 

Freshman Girl — Did you read about the man 
that got shot in the paper? 

Analytics had a quiz Tuesday. 

On last Friday Washburn Field was the scene 
of unbounded enthusiasm, when the schools of 
the city had a field meet under the auspices of 
the Anti-Cigarette League. The teams were 
unusually well matched, and were supported in 
a manner that would put to shame many a col- 
lege. There was a continual round of cheering 
the whole afternoon. The Liller school took 
both the team and individual performances. The 
best event was the high jump — the record being 
5 feet 4 inches. 

Among the recent additions to the library are 
the following: "The Story of My Life," Helen 
Keller; "A Captive of the Roman Eagles," Felix 
Dahn ; "Lovey Mary," Alice H. Rice; "A Wom- 
an's Hardy Garden," Helen R. Ely; "Animal 
Coloration," Frank E. Beddard ; A New Trans- 



lation of Don Quixote by John Ormsby, in two 
volumes ; A Collection of the Words of Uhland 
in six volumes (German) ; A Collection of Ger- 
man Poems by Dr. Hermann Kluge, 161 volumes 
have been added to the French alcove and twenty- 
nine to the Spanish. Besides these there has been 
the usual receipt of books and phamplets from 
the government, from various scientific societies 
at home and abroad and from individuals. Sev- 
eral hundred volumes have also been added to 
the Engineering department, consisting of the 
library of the late Prof. R. S. Miller, bound and 
unbound volumes of periodicals, a set of sixteen 
books on the science of railways, text-books, re- 
ports of various societies of engineers, etc. 

Among the more interesting gifts from in- 
dividuals is one from the Due de Loubat, "Codex 
Magliabecchiano 13," reproducted in photo cho- 
mographie and the "Private Letters of Edward 
Gibbon" in two volumes from the Rev. H. W. 
Lathe. 



"Would you say 'honest politics is,' or 'are?'" 
" 'Is,' of course, honest politics is always sin- 
gular." — K. U. Weekly. 

"Have you ever done anything to cause you to 
be remembered in the pages of history?" 

"No," answered Senator Sorghum, "and I 
don't know as I want to have much to do with 
history. When a reporter interviews you, you 
can always declare that you were misrepresent- 
ed; but if a historian gets after you, there is no 
chance to square yourself." — Washington Star. 

Editor-in-Chief (to office boy) — Bennie, 
vvhere's the theater tickets I sent you after? 

Bennie — I forgot 'em. 

City Editor — ^Bennie, where's that paste I sent 
you for? 

Bennie — I forgot it. 

Sporting Editor — Bennie, what was Jack Glass- 
cock's battin' average in 1888? 

Bennie (promptly) — Three hundred and 
eighty-six. — Cleveland Leader. 

One day little 8-year-old Mabel's aunt received 
?. letter, and while interested in its contents, the 
envelope dropped to the floor. Mabel, observ- 
ing it, picked it up and gravely said, as she re- 
turned it : "Auntie, here's the skin off your 
letter." 

Smarticus — Wonderful instance of the magical 
power of water, that. 

Sparticus — To what do you refer? 

Smarticus — I threw a spool in the water and 
it came up a-bobbin'. Baltimore American. 



THE TIGHR, 



ti 



SOCIETIES AND ASSOCIATIONS 



APOLLONIAN CLUB. 

Music. 

The Democratic party— 

"History of Party" Wasley 

"Grover Cleveland" McClintock 

"Bryan" Cox 

"Parker" Piatt 

"Principal Issues" . . . '. Williams . 

Resolved, That the Democratic party more 

than the Republican party represents the 

interests of the laboring man. 
Affirmative, Steffa, Finger. 
Negative, F. Middlesworth, Leuchtenburg. 



MINERVA. 



Who Wrote Shakespeare? 
Debate — 

Shakespeare. Miss McMillan 

Bacon Miss Ragan 

The Great Cryptogram Miss Stark 

Reading Miss Moore 



CONTEMORARY. 

"Popular Superstitions" Ada Brush 

"Every Day Life in Japan" Jessie Sammons 

"Japanese Women" Mildred Baker 

Song Evlyn Shuler 

HYPATIA. 

I. Quotation — Current Events. — 

"Rise of Japan" Ruth Gilbert 

"Rise of Russia" Ida Williams 



Y. M. C. A. 



PEARSONS LITERARY SOCIETY. 



Sunday afternoon Mr. Hedblom, president of 
the Y. M. C. A., gave a heart to heart talk to 
the young men. Taking for his subject, "Growth," 
the speaker showed wherein a man can only 
grow and delevope spiritually by coming in close 
touch with Christ. 

The College quartette sang. 

The Y. M. C. A. of the University of Virginia 
is to have a $60,000 building, the gift of Mrs. 
William E. Dodge. So far $19,000 has been 
raised for their endowment fund. 



Republican National convention — 

Bale, N. Y., leader of majority; Crothers, la.; 
Bennett, Ver. ; Angell, N. J.; Boatright, Mass.; 
C. Hall, N. H.; Lamb, Me.; Nash, R. I.; Shaw, 
Md. ; Thomas, Minn.; McCreery, Del; Bortrll, 
Mo.; French, Kas. ; Currier, Calif.; Mohler, 
Wash.; Burgess, Ida. M. Hall, Colo., leader mi- 
nority ; Birchby, Ind. ; Cobert, So. Car. ; Hed- 
blom, Tenn.; Muffley, Fla. ; Strock, N. Dak.; 
Willis, S. Dak.; Roberts, Tex.; Lovewell, Ga. ; 
Doane, N. Car. ; Musser, Miss. ; Moore, La. ; Mor- 
gan, O. T. ; Slane, Ariz. ; Swing, Ore. 



At Northwestern University $880 was raised 
for missions last year. A University missionary 
was supported in Africa. 

The State College at Ames, Iowa, has in the 
course of construction a $50,000 building for the 
use of the Christian associations. 

Mr. Lester McLean, Colorado College, 1899, 
and Chicago Theological Seminary, 1904, will 
spend two months visiting theological seminaries, 
colleges and universities in the West. 



WiJIliHHHW^xK^.H'I^M^M 



ACADEMY DEPARTMENT 

Farle S. Alden Editor 

F . C. Merrill Athletic Editor 



ACADEMY NOTES. 

The Fourth and Third classes were delight- 
fully entertained at the home of Miss Lennox 
on Saturday evening. Although the first party 
of the year, everyone present seemed to enjoy 
himself and the arrangement and plans carried 
out by the class committees were pronounced 
successes. 



The early part of the evening was spent with 
games, after which there were prizes distributed 
tc. the winners of the largest number of points. 
Miss Hoffermeier won first prize for girls while 
Mr. Elliott, of Pueblo, a guest of the Third and 
Fourth classes, carried off a handsome poster as 
first boy's prize. The booby prizes were clever 
burnt leather dolls and were won by Miss Masi 
and Johnson. Delicious refreshments, music and 



THE flG^R. 



original "stunts" added to the pleasure of the 
evening. 

Both classes are grateful for the privileges of 
Miss Lennox's beautiful home. 

The First Class party at the Kinnikinick 
Saturday evening was pronounced a most de- 
lightful affair. 



There is some talk of an Academy Tennis 
Tournament. Those interested should see Alden, 
or Mitchell. 

Armstrong is a new fellow in the Academy. 

Mr. Brehaut is to be critic at Hesperian this 
vear. 



(Heard at the Debate) : "An perhaps some 
ctike is thrown in — and has a good time." 



EXCHANGES. 



Young Lady (on the street car) to Academy 
student : "How old are you ?" 

Student : "You notice I pay full fare." 

Miss Bacharach says she knows how it goes 
to be busy doing nothing. 

Car-rides at midnight, while undoubtedly de- 
lectable affairs, might be classed under the gen- 
eral head : "Brotesque and Unusual." 

Moses says he likes chocolate. 



Hesperian elected the following new members 
at the last meeting : McDonald, '08 ; Haight, 
'08; Gregg, '07; Gile, '07. 



Student (handing in his paper) — The more I 
study on this subject the less I seem to know 
about it, professor. 

Prof. — You seem to have studied quite hard. 

Pupil — I wish I had been born a hundred years 
ago. 

Teacher— Why? 

Pupil — I wouldn't have so much history to 
study. — Herald. 



Students, if in need of glasses or repairs on 
same, see Ashby, the Optical Jeweler, the oldest 
established in the county. You will find every- 
thing right. 



*THE COLORADO ROAD. 




If you Want 






T/?e 'Be^t, 

The QuicKc4^t, 
The Mo^i 

ScLti^ factory 



Line to Denver or Pueblo buy a Colo- 
rado & Southern Ticket. Get them at 
City Office, 1 5 N. Tejon. 



J. H. SPRINGER, Commercial Agent. 
Come in and ask questions. 



THE TIGER 



13 



FresKixicriL 

If you will call at 
our store we will 
be pleased to pre- 
sent you with a 

HANDSOME CARD CASE 

TheW. B. DAVIS ClOTHING & FUR 
NISHING CO., 102 N. Tejon St, 



THE CRESCENT 

BOWLING ALLEYS 

115-117 North Cascade Ave. 

Telephone Main 863 



Private Alleys for Ladies 
Eight Alleys on one Floor 
Special Rates to Parties and Clubs 



7)r. To. Jowler, 

DENTIST 

IS South Jjeyon St. 



G. W. Pauly, B. S., D. O. Mrs. Lona E. Pauly, B. S. D. O. 

Graduates of A. T. Still's College of Osteopathy, 

Kirksville, Mo. 

DR. & MRS. PAULY, T^fi^^Iii'' 

Office, rooms 303-30i DeGraff Bldg. 118 N. Tejon St., Colo- 
rado Springs, Colo. Ph nes— Office i{ed 1272; Res. Ked323 
Hours 8 to 12 a . m . , 1 to 5 p . m. 



eurio Store 
The ©Id 

Wholesale and Retail 
Dealers in 

GENUINE INDIAN GOODS AND 
CURIOSITIES 

J. S. CANDELARIO, Prop., 

301 and 303 San Francisco Street, 

SANTA FE, N. M. 



next 



You are next to a good hair cut or shave when you patronize 



The Manhattan Barber Shop, J. R. WEYMAR, Prop. 3oe.bijoi 



WHITAKER & GARDNER 

30 N. TEJON ST. 

Headqttarters for 

e olleqe Shoes 

OF EVERY DESCRIPTION 

We have the best mining and civil engineering boot 
in tlie m rket 

WHITAKER & GARDNER 




^Taundry 



THE STAR is the leader for prompt 
and satisfactory service. 

SPECIAL RATES to students of col- 
lege and academy 

S. E. BENNETT, College Ag't. 



SEE OIR 



College Pillow Tops window 

7 Views. Best Souvenir or Gift Yet 

Ashford & Roberts 

126 N. Tejon St. 

15 per cent discouni to students on fra.ming 



w. I. Lcefls 



Columbia, Hartford, Rambler, Ideal & Tribune Bicycles 

The only first-class re air shop in town. Chainless wheels 
a specialty. Wheels for rent. Phone 517-A. I29N. Tejon 

Students Wishing a Special Course in Drawing, 

Water colors, Oil or China Paintings should call at 
ART STUDIO, 108 N. Tejon. MARION R. FORBUSH, 

Member of Art Institute. Chicag-o. 





Every Student 

Buy Shoes where the Style and 

PRICES ARE RIGHT 


1 


IS ENTITLED to a Special Discount on the best Shoes made at 
118 Sou.h Tejon Street R. A. HANDY SHOE CO. 



14 



THE TIGBR 











Colorado Coflege 




THE OLDEST INSTITUTION FOR 




HIGHER EDUCATION IN THE WEST 




FOUNDED AT COLORADO 




SPRINGS IN 1874 




Colorado College now offers advantages of the same 




grade as the best institutions. 






For information concerning Courses of Study, Rooms 






and Board, Physical Culture, etc., apply to 






WM. F. SLOCUM, President, 






or EDWARD S. PARSONS, Dean. 






For information in regard to the College Department of 






Music, inquire of 






EDWARD S. PARSONS, Dean. 






Those wishing information as to the Courses in Drawing, 






Painting, Designing, etc., etc., inquire of 






EDWARD S. PARSONS, Dean. 






For information concerning the Engineering Depart- 






ment, apply to 






FLORIAN CAJORI, 






Dean of Engineering School. 




Cutler Academy 


Cutler Academy is the Associated Prepartory School of 




Colorado College, in which students are prepared for any 
American College. Address, 

M. C. GILE, Principal. 











THE TIGER 



15 



The Albert Sechrist Manufacturing Co. 

WILL INSTALL GAS and 



1033 16th 
Street 



* 



ELECTRIC FIXTURES 

in your residence at Colorado Springs 
same price as Denver, without extra 
charge. Call and select your fixtures, 
or will send you a catalogue. 



DENVtR, 
tOI.O. 




The Williafflson=Baffner 
Engraving Company 



1633 Arapahoe Street 



DENVER 



The 50-mile-an-hour Wheel 

Reading Standard Bicycles 



SHEFF & RIGGS: 



Opposite Plaza Hotel 



Perkins Crockerj/ Co. 

r. A. PERKINS, Manager 

120 7f, Vejon St. 

^ to agon Load of ^ ^ 

Ne^w Wood Type 

And Other Me^teriads 

Of the 'dery Latent at 
your "DtJ^poscl _for 

Wirvdow Ca^rds 
Tickets, Flyers etc 

B J^ G 'RA V IJV G — U he Finest 

The Telegraph Job Rooms 119 e. p. p. Ave. 

Ask wKere TKe Tiger is Printed 



USE THE 
Colorado Midland 

in Going to 

Utah, 

Caiifornia 

and the 

West 

Best Line to Colorado Po nts 

Tlii>o trains daily Deiwer to 
Salt Lake City 

H. C. BUSH C. H. SPEERS, 

Traffic Mgf . G. P. A. 

R. T. DUNAWAY, C. P. A. 
Colorado Springs. 




JOHIN MOFPAT 

Tine Cailoring 

Repairing, Cleaning, Pressing. Special rates to 

College Students 
Over Walling's Book Store 16 South Tejon St. 

VEE WIINa^ 

EIE MP -ni^^ 



24 E. Kiowa St. 



Colorado Springs, Colo. 



NEW EMPIRE THEATRE 3 shows Daily -« l Matinee 3 P. M. 

„ IOC Evenings 7:30 and 8:45 



10C 



■VAUDEVILLE 



16 



THB TIGER. 



El Paso Cleaning & Tailoring Co. 

10 E. Kiowa St. Phone Main 6674 Colo. Springs 



Pressing Dyeing Altering 

C'eaning Repairing Tailoring 



Prof. Chas. J. Hausdorf 

TEACHER OE MANDOLIN, bllTAR AND BANJO 

Music furnished for weddings, receptions, 

entertainments, etc. 

21 North Tejon. 



Office Phone 509-B 



Residence Phone Red 871 



DR. HARRY L. MOREHOUSE 



DENTIST 



Hours 9-12, 1:30-5 



First N.itM Bank BIdg., room 8 



C. E. Arcularius & Co. 
jewelers 

Diamonds and Watches 

Fine Jewelry Manufacturing 

9 South Tejon St. Colorado Springs 



The 



Crissey & Fowler Lumber 
Company 



Phone 101 



117 to 123 West Vermijo Ave. 



For Prompt attention and Satisfactory 
Work, patronize the 

Monarch Hand 
Laundry 

KARL L. MOHLER, Prop. 
W. J. WALLRICH, College Agt. 

A perfect fiUtng shirt necessitates hand %>ork 
Phone 540 329 E. Pikes Peak Ave. 

FINE CHOCOLATE BON BONS 



Name on every Piece 

Ice Cream, Hot and Cold 

Sodas 

Fresh Candies made exery hour 



UNION ICE AND COAL COMPANY 

W. M. BANNING, Prop. 




goal» mood and Tec 

Dealers in ail kinds of Coal and Artificial and 
Natural Ice 

YardOffice,.105W. Vermijo Ave. City Office, 5 N. Tej( 




Moles and Superfious Hair removed with Electricity 
Hair Goods made to Order 

lUrs^ Jltina Betbtnan, 

HAIR DRESSING PARLORS 

27 E. Kiowa Phone Red 394 Ladies Bath 

Colorado Springs, Colo. 



Carriages, Cabs, 

'Busses, Baggage and 

Transfer Wagons 

effice, 15 North eascade 



Denver Law School 

Law Department of the 
University of Denver 

Three years' course leading to the degree of 
Bachelor of Laws. Courses in Mining and Irri- 
gation Law. Full resident faculty. For informa- 
tion address 

LUCIUS W. HOYT, Dean 

Ernest & Cranmer BIdg., Denver, Colo. 

Did You Know 

That our stock of package crackers is so 
great in its variety that you could have a 
change for every day for more than two 
months and yet not exhaust our list? Well, 
it's a fact. We have a. kind for every pos- 
sible time and occasion — and they are all 
good. Finest bakery goods in the city. 
Fancy Groceries 

W. N. BURGESS, 112 N. Tejon St. 

Titsworth & Davidson 
DAIRY 

2 MILES S. E. OF COLORADO SPRINGS. P. 0. BOX 6 

The Honck=Davidson Coal and Transfer Co. 

Dealers In 

CANON CITY, MAITLAND 
AND LIGNITE COAL 

Phone 473-B. Office US N. Tejon. P. O. Box 275 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 



4.4'4'«4'4'4*4'4>4>4>4>4>4>«l*4>4'4'«l'«i*4'4>4*4>4'«i>4>4>*i*«i>4>4*4*4'<i>4*4*<i>«»4*4*<»«i*4'4*4* 

I See 



'She Gow dy-Simmons Printing Coirvpany 

FOR WINDOW CARDS, TICKETS, ETC. ENGRAVED 
CARDS AND INVITATIONS ON SHORT NOTICE 



2/ Tforth 
7j0/on Si, 



X eOTRELL & LEONHRD, 

* ALBANY, N. Y. 

* Makers of CAPS and GOWNS to American Col- 

* leges and Universities from the Atlantic to 

* the Pacific. Bulletin, samples, etc. 
J, upon application. 



THE DERN TEA AND COFFEE CO. * 



Dealers in TEAS, COFFEES, SPICES, 
EXTRACTS. BAKING POWDERS, Etc. 



Phone 575 



29 S. Tejon St. 



The People's Gtoczry ami Market 



PHONE MAIN 868 




222 EAST PIKE'S PEAK 



♦ S. JAMES & SON, Props. 



Colorado Springs, Colorado f 



ST, JOHN & BARNES 

Oldest and largest plumbing and heating 

tstablishment in city. Your 

patronage solicited 



Telephone 13 



206 N. Tejon St. 



Phone Main 151 



Established 1897 



p. W. SMITH 

FAMILY GROCER, TEA AND 
COFFEE MERCHANT . ; : : : 
Orders Called! for and Promptly Delivered 

731 N. Weber St. Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Sellers of High 
Grade Coals 

THE COLORADO SPRINGS 
FIEL COMPANY 

112 Pike's Peak Ave. 

TELEPHONES 230, 213 



For Goodness Sake^c * 

Use TUDOR lower vein Coal % 
It beats all other Lignite * 

TUDOR COAL COMPANY, Cor. Cascade and Cucharas 4* 
4» 

(Ask your dealer for 

VICTOR 



Athletic 
Supplies 





10 Per Cent. OfF TO ALL STUDENTS ON D0U6US 
SHOES. DOUGUS SHOE STORE. 



« USE ELECTRIC UGHT 
X IN YOUR HOMES 



The Colorado Springs Electric Co. : 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦«♦♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦« 



r 



The Yoxxfii^ Metm^s Store* 

• — ■ ■ ; -^ i 

Yoxiti^ Men-^s Overcoats 

^OXPECTING a considerable increase of sales in this Depart- 
^^ ment we start the season with a much larger and more ex- 
clusive stock jof styles than ever before. 

All the leading styles worn by college men of the eastern 
colleges are represented in our fall lines. 



4, SPECIAL DISCOUNT 
4 TO STUDENTS 



Prices $10.00 to $25.00 

HOLBROOK & PERKINS 



THE DENVER FIRE CLAY CO. 

MANUFACniRERS OF 
AND DEALERS IN 



t Chemical and Physicial Apparatus and Chemicals 



A FULL LINE OF UBORATORY SUPPLIES AND ASSAY GOODS 
Write for Illustrated Catalogues 



♦ 1742-1746 Champa Street, 



DENVER, COLORADO 



: Excellent Photographs 



at BINGHAM & WOOD'S. 18 S. Tefon 



4> H. C COLBURN, Prcs. 



E. A. COLBURN, }u. Sec V aad Tr eas. 



The ^yintler^ ^yititotnohtle Co. 

LIVER.Y. STORAGE. REPAIRING 

Telephone Main 122 B^MO ff, J^eH)ada A«;#. Colorado Springs, Colo, 



^ 



O. R HEMENWAY 



Groceries and Meats 



115 South Tcjon St 
Colorado Springs, Colorado 



♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦4««4>4><l>«4>« ♦♦♦♦#♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 



-» 



^ 



£H£ TIGER 



Colora^do College 






\ 




/ 



OCTOBE:R.20tH, 1904 

/dumber 6. 



VOLl/ME VII. 



▼ «§» <ll f^ ^ iji ^ iji «li 1^ 



V ▼ *■• •l*'t* V «!• •!* V •!• 



Special Rates to Students 

On Rented Pianos 




The KNIGHT - eSMPBELL 
Music Company 



*f* New Lennox Block 
4» 



<9pposite North Park 



St. John Bros.r"'^*^™"" 

Gas and Steam Fitters 

Hot Water Heating a Specialty 

Prompt attention given to Repair Work. 

(Eurtis goal go. 

Office 132 N. Tejon St. Telephone 91. 

Try ''NEW RANGE" for the Kitchen, $4.00. 
BITUMNOUS COAL AT STANDARD PRICES. 

SELDOMRIDGE BROTHERS, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

Flour, Feed, Graitif Hay and Seeds 

108 South Tejon Street 

Repairing while You Wait Satisfaction Guaranteed 

A complete plant of New Machinery for 
the Manufacture of Fine Boots and Shoes 

The Lightning Shoe Shop 

BROWN & COMPANY 
We make a specialty of Shoes to Measure and Shoes for 
Cripples. 28H North Tejon St. Coloeado Spbings 

Visiting Cards in latest Styles. 

WE SouW gy advertising in THE TiGER that we 
lilU.M........ appreciate your custom. 

22 E. Kiowa St. The Prompt Printery 



The 

Hassell Iron Works Co. 



Founders and Machinists 



4*4»4*«i*4'4'4*<i*4»4>4>4>4*4»<i»4>4*«i*4*4»««l» 



7l/e Tl/elcome 



THE STUDENTS, 

new and old, at our studio, 

Corner Cascade and Kiowa 




T/UMj 



Dealer in Kodaks and Supplies. 



COLLEGE GOWNS, CAPS 

The Best Workmanship 
at Lowest Prices 

Silk Faculty Gowns and Hoods 




COX SONS & VININe 

262 Fourth Avenue., NEW YORK 



F©OT BHLLS 

Pants, Nose Guards, 
Tennis Goods 
and Sweaters 



at Strangs 

119 North Tejon Street 



Mueth's 

Soda, Ice 6ream 

eATERING 

CHAS. T. FERTIG 

^^al Estate, Loans and Insurance 
29 N, Tejon Street 

TJhe Colorado Springs Jfioral Co* 

FLORISTS 



70^ 9/ortA TTet/oM Str^mt 



DOVGLrAs est he:the:r.ington 

Phone 556-B Rooms 15-16 Outwest Building, Colorado Springs, Colo. 

41^14.4.41414141 41 4. 4>4'<i»4>*i»<»4»«i*4»4*4*4»«i»4>4**i*4>4»«4»4*<i"i*«4*«»4*4>4'«i*4>4>4*« 



TTiB TICSR 



Student's Book Store Books stationery; air Engi- 

^__^^^____^^_______.^ neer's Supplies; College Pins 



and Watch Fobs, 
and up. 



Century Fountain Pens $1 to $4, Waterman's $2.50 

REYER & PLATT. 



Eor SI 00 D6r month ' ^"'^ sponged and Pressed each week 

• -i- PANTATORIUM, 

17 East Bijou, Branch Office opp. Plaza Hotel. 



THE COLORADO SPRINGS CO, 

The Original Locators of 

Coiorado Springs and 7/fanitou 

is still offering for sale choice 
lots on North Weber Street 
and North Wahsatch Avenue 

Also lots for sale In other parts of Coiorado Springs 
and in Manitou 

Apply at ROOM 8, OUTWEST BUILDING 



L©U1S ST©eK 



steam Dye and Cleaning 
Works 



Office and Works, \\b N. Tcjon St. 

TELEPHONE 517-B 

Cleaning, Dyeiug, Sconring in all its branches 

Ostrich Plumes Cleaned, Dyed and Curled 

Kid Gloves Dyed and Cleaned. 



GIDDINGS BROS. 



Fine dress Goods and Ladies' 
TAILOR Suits, Ladies' 
Furnishings 



Kiowa and Tejon Streets. 



CHARLES P. BENNETT 

Real Estate, Loans 
and Insurance*^ ^ 

NO. 5 PIKE'S PEAK AVENUE 

D. E. MONROE & CO, 
Prescription Druggist 

The best of Drugs, Stationery and Toilet Articles 

NO LIQUORS SOLD. 
eon Teion S( Bijou Pbone 311 S( 331 

THE HEFLEY-ARCULARILS DRUG CO. 
Drud9i$t$ 

Kodaks, Cameras and all kinds of Photographic 
Supplies. Developing and Printing for Am ituers. 
Free Delivery. 
Phone 144 21 South Tejon Street 



l^ardware Bicycles 

H. S. BLHKE 

New Chainless Bicycle $35 and $20 
Rambler, Orient and National Automobiles 

Best Kepait* Sbop in city 107 n. Ceion 

nirs. Ii« K« Crooks 

Collet Parlors ati20 6a$t Kioiva 

Also Room 52, Antlers Hotel 

No Apprentices. Only experienced help employed. 

A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 

Largest Manufacturers in the World of Official 
Athletic Supplies 

The football supplies manufactured by A. G. SPALD- 
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country. 

SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOTBALL GUIDE. Edited 
by Walter Camp. Contains the NEW RULES for 1904. 
Price, 10 cents. 

SPALDING'S HOW TO PLA\ FOOT BALL. Edi ed by 
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"If it pertains to athletics, we make it." 

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New York, Chicago, Denver San Francisco, St. Louis 

Send for a co y of Spalding's Fall and Winter 

Sports Catalogue. It's Fr e. 

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Druggist 

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at our Soda Fountain 

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THE TIGBR. 



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Jeweler and Silversmith P"ce to Students. 



Vhe TIGCIt 



Vol. VII. 



COLORADO COLLEGE, OCTOBER 20, 1904. 



No. 6 



JAPANESE LANDSCAPE GARDENING 



The mention of Japan has always brought be- 
fore my mind a picture of dainty, almond-eyed, 
Japanese women in gay flowered kimonos, gliding 
noiselessly over garden paths that were lined with 
cherry blossoms. And yet, although the cherry 
blossoms were always the most prominent note in 
the picture, I never associated them with cherries 
or cherry trees — they were just delicate pink flow- 
ers of wonderful beauty, and how they grew was 
d matter of no consequence. Japan was for me 
a land of flowers, not of plants or trees, but just 
of flowers, and chiefly of cherry blossoms. 

All these beautiful fancyings, however, were 
rudely crushed when I discovered that Japan was 
not a land of flowers but of gardens and land- 
scape gardens at that. These landscape gardens 
are in no sense flower gardens ; they are not even 
for the purpose of cultivating plants and in nine 
cases out of ten there is nothing in them resem- 
bling a flower bed. Some of these gardens contain 
scarcely a sprig of green and some contain no 
green at all but consist entirely of rocks and 
pebbles. 

There is no fixed allowance of space for these 
gardens, they may cover many acres, or only one 
acre; or perhaps only ten square feet. In fact 
a Japanese landscape garden can be contrived 
small enough to put into a fruit dish. These tiny 
gardens are called "koniwa" and are to be seen 
in the humble dwellings of the poorer class where 
there is no room for an outdoor garden. The 
"koniwa" are usually made in some quaintly 
shaped vessel or flat carved box, unlike anything 
to be seen in England. In them are created 
minute hills crowned by minuscule temples, sur- 
rounded by tiny streams spanned by microscopic 
humped bridges; queer wee plants do duty for 
trees and little pebbles for rocks ; and the whole is 
a charming and living model of a Japanese land- 
scape. 

A good Japanese landscape garden, however, 
should comprise at least thirty square feet and 
consist of the following five essential parts : 

First, bright pebbles, blue, white red and all 
colors, are gathered from the river beds or ocean 
shore, dried and carefully polished and laid in 
beds, similar to our flower beds. These beds are 
kept free of dust and dirt and no one would think 
of stepping on them, any more than we would 
think of stepping on a bed of rare orchids. In- 



deed, unless one can appreciate the true beauty 
of stones, and see that they have tone, values and 
character, much of the true artistic beauty of a 
Japanese landscape garden is lost. For not only 
are the stones arranged with a view to their ex- 
pressiveness of form but each stone has an in- 
dividual name, indicative of its purpose or decora- 
tive duty. 

Secondly, in every Japanese landscape garden 
there are at least one or two flowering shrubs, 
planted confusedly and yet, following a certain 
rule. Among them, if possible, there is also some 
queer outlandish or dwarfed tree. 

Thirdly, off in one corner of the garden stands 
a hill or high rock curiously adorned with birds 
and insects cast in brass and placed about among 
the stones in a very lifelike manner. Some times 
there stands a tiny model of a temple on the hill ; 
and some times a little brook runs down its sides 
with pleasant babbling. 

Fourthly, on one side of the hill there is al- 
ways a microscopic forest. For this purpose the 
gardeners select such trees as grow close together 
and cut and plant them according to their size, 
and the nature and color of their leaves and 
flowers, so as to give a good representation of a 
real Japanese forest. 

Fifthly, there must be a pond. This pond is 
lined with bright pebbles and filled with the 
pretty gold fish and sun fish. Around its edge 
are planted water plants, such as will not grow in 
a dry soil. Sometimes in the center of the pond 
there is a little srrassv islet where one may sit 
and look at the lotus flowers. 

Every Japanese landscape garden from the tiny 
"koniwa" to those containinsr many acres, include 
these five essential parts. The Jaoanese do not 
aim to create in their gardens an impossible or 
purely ideal landscape. They seek to faithfully 
portray the real attractions of a real landscape, 
and as trees, hills, ponds and streams form the 
essential features of almost every landscape so 
they form the essential features of the landscape 
gardens. As flowers are only incidental parts of 
a landscape so they are only incidental parts of 
these landscape gardens. 

And yet the Japanese do have some of the most 
beautiful flower gardens in the world. They are, 
however, entirely separate from the landscape 
gardens. By paying a few sen one may walk 



THB TIGER. 



about the great', public chrysanthemum garden and 
see all Japanese history and mythology repre- 
sented in growing flowers. 

There are war scenes, in which the armor and 
weapons of the warriors are made of living and 
growing chrysanthemums. There are famous pic- 
tures, made of the living flowers ; and most won- 
derful of all, in one of the gardens there is a 
great ship, life size, in which are seated the six 
gods of riches, life size also, all made of living 
and growing chrysanthemums. 

The cherry and plum gardens of Japan are also 
very beautiful, especially in the spring. The blos- 
soms come out before the leaves, and give the 
appearance of a great sunset cloud wrapped in 
fleecy pinkness about the bare trunks and 
branches. Our cherry and plum trees are a pretty 
sight when in blossom, but a Japanese cherry or 
plum tree in blossom is a miracle of beauty. Gaz- 
ing upon such a sight one can easily believe with 
the Japanese, "Verily, trees, rocks and flowers, 
all should enter into the Kingdom of Heaven." 

A. K., '06. 



A DAY WITH DR. LANCASTER AT 
OLIVET COLLEGE. 

About eighteen miles east of Battle Creek in 
cue of the richest agricultural districts of Michi- 
gan one stops at the little Olivet station and is 
directed two miles south to the village built up 
around the college campus. Long before one 
reaches the village his eye is attracted to a high, 
thickly wooded hill out of whose green top stand 
out" several high church towers. 

After passing through the village there opens 
up a broad street bordered on either side by giant 
oaks and elms. This leads to the top of the hill 
c-.nd divides the campus proper. Beyond the 
campus I was directed to a quaint looking house, 
completely surrounded by immense trees of many 
kmds of luscious fruit. Grapes grew in profusion 
every w^iere. A neighboring corn field waved 
on the slope behind the house, and beyond could 
be- seen a native wood. From an upper window 
toward the south one commanded a magnificent 
view of a large lake. To the north only a par- 
tial view of the campus. 

As tiie noon hour approached the throng of 
students packed into the chapel. On one side sat 
the girls, upon the other was a considerably 
smaller number of boys. Back of the altar stood 
k pipe organ, and on one side sat the faculty in 
a body. 

After some moments of quiet pause. President 
Lancaster arose and upon the reading of a 
stanza the students arose and sang a hymn. Aft- 
erwards they joined in the responsive reading of 
a psalm, followed by a short scriptual reading 



with a lesson drawn from it. After prayer the 
students quietly filed out. 

In the afternoon we visited the large library 
building which furnishes one of the most com- 
manding views of the campus. Across the campus 
from the library we entered the Science building 
and from the cozy little office of the President 
could be had a glimpse of all the buildings on the 
campus. Under the stately oaks could be seen the 
students going from building to building. On 
two sides of the campus stood beautiful memorial 
churches and on the third a girls' dormitory and 
Greek letter literary halls. 

To sum it all up, it was beautiful. Dr. Lancas- 
ter may be proud of his college for it seems to 
carry with it wonderful possibilities with such 
a man to direct its future as President Lancaster. 

C. C. M., ex-'o6. 



FOOTBALL SCORES. 

At Annapolis — Annapolis, 10 ; Princeton, 9. 
At Philadelphia — Pennsylvania, 6 ; Brown, o. 
At New York — Amherst, 12; Columbia, o. 
At New Haven, Conn. — Yale, 17; Syracuse, 9. 
At West Point — Harvard, 4; West Point, o. 
At Ithaca — Cornell, 24; Bucknell, 12. 
At Newton, Mass. — Dartmouth, 11; Williams, 
o. 

At Bethlehem — Lehigh, o; Haverford, 6. 
At Carlisle — Indians, 100; Albright, o. 

CENTRAIv AND WESTERN SCORES. 

At Salt Lake — University of Utah, 17; Univer- 
sity of Montana, o. 

At Lawrence — University of Kansas, 6; Uni- 
versity of Colorado, 6. 

At Minneapolis — Minnesota, 2>^ ; Ames, o. 

At Columbus— Ohio State University, 6; Mich- 
igan, 31. 

At Champaign, 111. — Illinois, 10; Indiana, o. 

At Milwaukee — Wisconsin, 58; Notre Dame, o. 

At Delaware, O. — Wesleyan, 22; Oberlin, it. 

At Chicago — Northwestern University, 34; Be- 
Icit, o. 

STATE SCORES. 

At Denver — Manual Training School, 6; North 
Denver, o. 

At Boulder — State Preparatory School, 35 ; 
West Denver High School, o. 

At Golden — School of Mines, 10; Denver Uni- 
versity, 6. 

At Pueblo— Centennial High School, 75 ; Aspen, 
o. 



"Yes, sir ; we can change anything here." 
"Wish you'd change my mind, then, if you're 
so good at it." 
"Have no small changei sir."— Ex. 



THE TIGHR 



BOWLING. 



Last Thursday evening the College bowling 
team, although defeated, played an excellent game. 
Nine hundred and sixty-one pins secured in the 
last game is one of the best scores ever rolled in 
this town. The bowling of West, who rolled his 
first game with the team, was especially note- 
worthy as he only made two erros during the 
evening. Bernard's score of 244 was a "peach" 
as he made a poor start. Bernard, West and 
Smith went away over 200 for the College. The 
standing of the College in the league is : Two 
won and three lost, .400. The Standard Club is 
considered one of the best teams in the league. 
The score: 

STANDARD CLUB. 

Roberts 190 171 136 497 

Johnson 174 I57 226 557 

Magers 180 138 158 476 

Myers 180 138 158 476 

Bielow 184 212 194 590 

89^ 835 S71 2f^6di: 

COLORADO COLLEGE. 

Tyler 82 150 147 479 

West "233 169 178 560 

Hoffman 100 100 

French 148 168 316 

Smith 154 129 224 507 

Bernard 150 183 244 577 



Blunt defeating French, and Middleworth de- 
feating Swing. The second round will undoubt- 
edly furnish some very good tennis. The prizes 
are well worth striving for, so everyone may be 
relied on to do his best. 



819 779 961 2559 



CALENDAR. 



Friday, October 21 : 
4 ;oo p. m. Minerva Closed Meeting 

4 30 p.m. Hypathia Cutler Academy 

5 ;oo p.m. Contemporary Ticknor Study 

7 :oo p. m. Y. W. C. A Ticknor Study 

7 :oo p. m. Appollonian Club House 

7 .30 p.m. Pearsons Cutler Academy 

Saturday, October 22 : 

3:00 p. m. Tigers vs. Alumni Washburn Field 

Admission, 25 cents. 

Sunday, October 23 : 
4:00 p. m. Y. M. C. A.. .Appollonian Club House 

Rev. Paisley speaks. 

Special music. 



TENNIS TOURNAMENT. 

The drawings for the preliminaries have re- 
sulted as follows : French vs. Blunt, Curries vs. 
Reyer, Smith vs. Alden, Doane vs. Brehaut, Nash 
vs. Wasley, Moore vs. Angell, McLain vs. Merrill, 
Swing vs. Middlesworth, Parsons bye. 

Two matches have already been played off — 



"Dear lady, please help an unfortunate man. I 
ain't had any work at my trade since last winter." 
"Poor man! What's your trade?" 
"Shoveling snow, ma'am." 



CONCERNING CORRECT SPEECH. 

Oh, why should the spirit 

Of grammar be proud. 
And such a wide margin 

Of language allowed ? 

Of course there's a limit— j 
"I knowed" and "I've saw," 

"I seen" and "I done it" 
Are rather too raw. 

But then there are others 

No better than they. 
One hears in the speech 

That is used every day. 

"Where at?" asks one person 
Quite thoughtless, and "Who," 

Asks another, "did Mary 
Give that bonnet to?" 

Hear the maid as she twitters : 

"Oh, yes, I went out 
With she and her fellow 

In his runabout." 

And hear a man saying 

"Between you and I 
That block of Pacific 

Would make a good buy." 

And this from a mother 

Too kind to her boy, 
"I had rather you shouldn't 

Do things to annoy." 

And this from a Junior 

Concerning a show, 
Who says to a maiden, 

"Let's you and I go." 

There's lots of good students 

That's talking like that, 
Who should learn from we critics 

To know where they're at. 

— A. A., Penn Chronicle. 



6 THU TIGER. 

T H £# T 1 G E Rr driven to it. They are reluctant about taking up 

~ any line of work that will require hard, sustained 

Published weekly during the College year by ^ff^^^ ,^ ^^^^-^ ^ reasonable success in it. They 

The Tiger Publishing Co., in the interest of Colo- ^^ ^^^ g^^.^ outsiders the impression of being men 

ra o o ege. ^^^ women who are to do things in the world a 

J. Y. Crothers Editor-in-Chief ^*^^ years hence. College graduates should be the 

T. Hunter Assistant Editor-in-Chief People who rule the world, in politics, in com- 

J. I. Muf fley Athletic Editor merce, in literature, in fact, in every line of work. 

Miriam Carpenter Literary Editor ^^^ ™^^^ ^^^ responsibilities that are coming to us 

Mabel Barbee Alumni Editor '^^' ^ ^^^ y^^^^ ^^ ^s necessary that we train our- 

A. H, Fisher Local Editor selves to perform our present duties well — to have 

Bert Wasley Business Manager ^^^ "^"^^^ ^^^^ respect to let any work remain half 

C. A. Hedblom Assistant Business Manager ^^^^• 

One instance to which special attention is called 

CORRESPONDENTS : at present, is our duty toward our country in cast- 

ing an intelligent ballot. The situation in this 

Mr. Nash, Miss McDowell, Miss Isham, Miss ^^ate calls for special thought on the part of every 

Kidder, Mr. Lamb, Mr. Reeks, Miss Arbuckle. ^^^er. Nothing is so pernicious as a blind devo- 

Subscription, $1.25 per year, payable in advance. tion to party. The principle of "My party, right or 

Single copy, 5 cents. wrong," is one that will bring disgrace and ruin 

^ ;;;; : T"' , , , ~ r ~ ~: to any land. The college student of today should 

i HE 1 IGER IS forwarded to all subscribers until , , , , . , 

,,,. ^j,,, -1 prepare to be the leader of tomorrow, and one way 

ordered discontinued and all arrearanges are paid. , , . . , , , . . ' . , 

1 to do this IS to study the political situation, and 

Students, Professors and Alumni are invited master it. Principle and the man behind the prin- 

to contribute literary articles, personals and items. ciple is everything to the patriot, no matter what 

Contributions must be accompanied by the writer's name may be attached to these principles. To be 

name. practical, there are but three more days for regis- 

Address all communications to The Tiger, Oration. Let every College student— except those 
Colorado College, Colorado Springs, Colo. "^^^^ age— see that his name is on the books. 
Then vote intelligently and righteously. 

Entered at the Postoffice at Colorado Springs, 

Colo., as second-class matter. Q^r^ INTO THE GAME. 



Patroni^se Tiger Advertisers 



EDITORIAL 

RESPONSIBILITY. 

[ F there is any sharp dividing line between child- 
hood with its careless happiness, and manhood 
with its thoughtful responsibility, it should come 
upon a young man's entrance into college life. 
Even before this time he should have learned to a 
great degree to depend on himself, and think of 
himself as one who is to carry on a part of the 
world's work, but when a young man enters col- 
lege he is supposed to have "put away childish 
things." We do not mean that his brow should 
become immediately furrowed with care: ftie 
should meet his tasks with cheerfulness and a 
consciousness of power within himself to over- 
come obstacles. Self respect is necessary to any 
man's real success in the world, and the respect 
of others is not to be thought of lightly. It has 
been noticed particularly by those acquainted with 
the student life in the best institutions in the 
country, that there is a tendency on the part of 
students here to regard themselves as boys and 
girls — still children. They do not study unless 



T T has been the pleasure of the writer to read the 
last edition of the "Silver and Gold," Such 
enthusiasm is always refreshing, even when it 
comes from our rivals. The State University cer- 
tainly has a football team of which all Colorado 
may well be proud from its record of two victories 
over teams from neighboring state universities, 
and a tie with another. However, instead of dis- 
couraging us this simply puts us on our mettle, 
for to win the game of October 29 will be all the 
greater honor for us. This game can be won only 
by splendid playing on the part of the team and 
magnificent backing on the part of every student. 
The Tigers played such a game last Saturday as 
deserves the praise of all. Once more they really 
deserve that name which marks them as the fierc- 
est of antagonists. It is time for the Knockers' 
Club to take a back seat, or rather to disband and 
join the Rooters' Club. This latter organization 
has become quite flourishing in the last few 
weeks. The greatest victories won on the gridiron 
have been inspired by the most strenuous support 
given a team by the Rooters' clubs. The only vic- 
tories that mean anything are those which cost 
us something — which take a great effort to be at- 
tained. Then sacrifice something and encourage 
the men at football practice the next week. 



THE TIGBR 



THE ALUMNI GAME. 

NjEXT Saturday comes the annual Alumni game, 
at which the students may see some of the 
old stars about whom they have heard so much. 
Some of the best players of the days when the 
Tigers used to win the championship by over- 
whelming scores will be on the gridiron again. 
Frost, who played such a magnificent center in 
'98, will show some of the present line men how 
it is done. He has gained valuable experience at 
Harvard since leaving here, and will give an ex- 
hibition of football that will be worth seeing. One 
of the best ends that ever played in the state, is 
Armstrong. His special stunt is nipping end 
runs in the bird, and throwing the runner back 
for a loss of six yards. On punts "Army" is not 
at all slow, either. While not playing such a 
spectacular position, Griffith, captain of the team 
of 1900, will do some work which will make our 



tackles wish they were up against Boulder instead 
cf an ex-C. C'. man. There may be other stars of 
the first magnitude in the game, such as Jonson, 
who kicked a Princeton from the 42-yard line one 
Thanksgiving game. It is also possible that the 
coach will get into the game. In case he does no 
one will regret being on Washburn Field, unless 
it is some of the Tigers who play against him. 
No one should need urging to come out to this 
game. We have very few games at home this 
year, which is all the greater reason for your see- 
ing all of them. 



\A/ ANTED — Some bicycle racks in front of 
Palmer Hall. The grass is being trampled 
down, the evergreens are being broken, and the 
steps are sometimes so obstructed that there are 
few places where a person can make an exit 
gracefully. The landscape gardener will please 
take notice. 




^ ^f 4F4 f ^f^ f ^f ^f ^F ^S 0^f ^f^ 



ATHLETIC 
DEPARTMENT 



C. C. 41— S. H. C. 0. 



The Tigers found an easy prey in the Sacred 
Heart team last Saturday. The final score of 41 
to o, may seem large to anyone who did not wit- 
ness the game, but for those who were present it 
was evident that except for the extreme slowness 
of the field, we would have piled up 10 or 15 
more points. 

The playing of the team as a whole was fast and 
consistent. Mack and Morgan were the surest 
line buckers, and Seybold was especially strong on 
end runs. Glynn's line plunging was the feature of 
the second half. Vandemoer also did well on the 
tackle back plays. Mack did well on the fake 
punt, and Randolph made two good runs on the 
Cjuarter-back plays. 

Although Sacred Heart can not teach us foot- 
ball, they can give us cards and spades when it 
comes to "rooting." Many of the students there 
are small in stature, but none of them are small in 
voice. Throughout the entire game and during 
the intermission there was a continuous uproar 
of encouraging yells and songs. Never till the 
game was over were the shouts of v-i-c-t-o-r-y 
given up. 



Sacred Heart deserves praise and thanks for 
the courteous treatment, accorded our team. 
Everything had been planned and arranged for in 
the best possible manner, and there was nothing 
left to be expected or desired. 

The game in detail is as follows : Captain Len- 
nox won the toss, and chose to defend the east 
goal. Sacred Heart kicked off to Morgan on the 
15-yard line. He carried the ball 20 yards before 
he was downed. Mack skirted right end for 30 
more yards. Morgan hit tackle for 10. Seybold 
went through for 5. Morgan made another 5 
through the line. Seybold carried the ball to 
Sacred Heart's 25-yard line. Mack hit center for 
3, and Morgan for i. Morgan went around left 
end to Sacred Heart's 5-yard line. Seybold made 
3 and Morgan carried the ball over in less than 
5 minutes after call of play. Lennox missed goal. 
Score, 5 to o. 

On the second kick off Morgan carried the ball 
to the center of the field before he was downed. 
Mack made 2, Morgan 10, and Seybold 3 through 
the line. On fake quarter, Randolph carried the 
ball to Sacred Heart's 30-yard line. Randolph 



THE flC^BR. 



fumbled the next pass, but made a neat recovery. 
By a series of bucks off tackle the ball was car- 
ried forward 20 yards. Seybold made 2 around 
right end. Morgan carried it up to the line. Mack 
took it over for the second touch down in less 
than 12 minutes of play. Lennox kicked an easy 
goal. Score, 11 to o. 

Sacred Heart chose to keep the ball. Loring 
Lennox kicked off to Sacred Heart on their 15- 
yard line. W. Lennox downed the man after a 
gain of 5 yards. Sacred Heart was forced to 
kick, after two ineffectual line bucks. Randolph 
caught the ball and ran it back 15 yeards. Seybofd 
\\as thrown back on end run. Morgan made 7 
through tackle. Mack made 20 yards on a fake 
punt. Morgan and Mack made 3 each through 
line. Morgan made 8 on an end run, and 3 
through tackle. Morgan carried it to the i-yard 
Ime, and Mack carried it over. Lennox kicked 
goal. Score, 17 to o. 

Sacred Heart kicked to Lennox who fumbled, 
and the ball rolled behind the line. Vandemoer 
kicked out from the 25-yard line. The ball was 
fumbled and W. Lennox fell on it. Morgan and 
Mack each made 10 through the line. Seybold 5 
around end. Morgan made 5 through center, and 
Seybold 3 more around end. Randolph made 7 
on quarter-back run. By a series of line plunges 
and end runs by Mack, Morgan and Seybold, the 
ball was taken to the i-yard line. Seybold carried 
it over. Lennox kicked goal. Score, 23 to o. 

Time for the first half was called immediately 
after the next kick-off. Score, C. C. 23 ; S. H. o. 

In the second half Mosteller replaced Fawcett 
and Fisher replaced W. Lennox. Lennox kicked 
off to Sacred Heart on their 5-yard line. The 
ball was carried 30 yards before the man was 
downed. Three line bucks failed to make five 
yards, and the ball went to C. C. Morgan and 
Seybold made 3 and i through tackle. Mack 
made 11 through line, Seybold made 5, and Mor- 
gan 15, around end. Morgan hit tackle for 6. 
The next play carried the ball to the line, and 
Mack took it over. Lennox kicked goal. Score, 
29 to o. 

Glynn replaced Morgan. Sacred Heart kicked 
off to Glynn, who caught the ball on 5-yard line, 
and carried it 30 yards before he was downed. 
Glynn made 10 through tackle. On left shift for- 
mation, Randolph fell, but recovered himself 
quickly, and made 3 yards. By skillful use of 
straight arm, Glynn succeeded in making 30 around 
left end. Glynn, Seybold and Mack took the ball 
to Sacred Heart's 15-yard line, and Glynn carried 
it over for a touchdown. Lennox kicked an easy 
goal. 

Lennox kicked off to Sacred Heart on the 10- 
yard line. The ball was returned 15 yards. Sacred 
Heart made i on crossbuck and then 2 more on 
s.'ime play, but the ball was taken on account of 



offside playing by both teams. Sacred Heart 
made 15 through tackle, but lost the ball on 
fumble. C. C. was penalized for offside playing, 
and the ball was returned to Sacred Heart. The 
next three line plunges brought the ball 18 yards 
nearer the C. C. goal. Sacred Heart made only 
4J/2 yards on the next three plays, and the ball 
went to C. C. Seybold made 25 yards around 
right end. Vandemoer was pulled back, and Glynn 
went in at tackle. Vandemoer made 4 on a cross- 
buck, 4 on a straight buck, and 6 around end. 
Mack made 7 through tackle. Vandemoer was 
stopped at the line. Seybold made 5 through 
tackle. Mack made no gain. Vandemoer made 
A, and Mack i. Vandemoer made no gain on 
crossback. Glynn-came back, and Vandemoer went 
in at tackle again. Glynn carried it over and 
placed it squarely behind the goal posts. Lennox 
made goal. Mack was replaced by Gibbs, and 
Hedblom by Willis. 

Lennox kicked off. Sacred Heart returned the 
kick, and Glynn booted it over the line. Sacred 
Heart kicked out from 25-yard line. Gibbs caught 
the ball, and returned it 20 yards. Time was up. 
Final score, Colorado College 41, Sacred Heart 
o. The line up was as follows : 
Sacred Heart — Colorado College — 

Dwyer c Bale 

Walsh 1. g Fawcett-Morsteller 

McErmnery 1. t Howbert 

Danahey r. t Vandemoer 

Johnston ( Capt) ... .1. c (Capt.) L. Lennox 

Dorch r. e W. Lennox-Fiher 

Sullivan q. b Randolph 

Tipton 1. h Seybold 

Gilmour r. h Morgan-Glynn 

Gonzallez f . b Mack-Gibbs 

iReferee, Griffith ; umpire, Mouat ; linemen, 
Dibble, Gibbs ; timer, Dolan. 

Touchdowns, Morgan i. Mack 3, Seybold i, 
Glynn 2. 



NOTES OF SATURDAY'S GAME. 
Only once during the entire game was it doubt- 
ful whether the Tigers had made the required five 
yards. 

We made but one fumble, and that one "Shorty" 
turned to our advantage by a neat recovery, and 
a one-yard gain. 

Captain Lennox showed last Saturday that he 
was perfectly competent to do our place kicking. 

The Tigers line held Sacred Heart for downs 
whenever the ball was in the latter's possession. 

The geology class had almost a perfect day for 
its trip up the Peak. The walk back was espec- 
ially enjoyed by some excursionists. 



THE TIGER. 



The result of the Boulder-Kansas game em- 
phasizes the fact that in order to win the cham- 
pionship, lots of hard, consistent practice is ne- 
cessary. 

Golden and D. U. played last Saturday. Golden 
won by a score of lo to 6, but D. U. attributes 
her defeat more to hard luck than to Golden's 
superior playing. 

The Tigers were penalized once for offside 
playing and Sacred Heart not all all. 

The Seniors are already getting on their dig- 
nity, though the great day is four weeks off. 



Miss lone Montgomery entertained the members 
of Hypatia at a very delightful tea Tuesday aft- 
ernoon. 

Professor and Mrs. Schneider chaperoned a 
crowd of College students to the canons Wednes- 
day. 

Miss Elinor Porter and Miss Wagner were 
guests of honor at birthday spreads last week at 
Montgomery. "Chicken patties" were the favorite 
dish. 

Miss Humphreys entertained the "Celestials" at 
a spread last week. 



Has anyone with a worn expression asked you 
what an argument is, or what to argue about? 



ALUMNI NOTES. 

Ella Fillius, '03, is attending D. U. 

Inez Ridgeway, ex-'o5, will graduate from Vas- 
sar next June. 

Frank Bailey, '98, is studying physics at Clark 
University, Worcester, Mass. 



Miss Rodger entertained a number of the new 
girls at a bridge party Friday evening. 

About thirty girls attended the Republican Na- 
ttional Convention Friday night. 

The Freshman girls of McGregor held a kissing 
bee last week. Can you guess who carried off the 
prize? 

Mr. J. W. McCreery from Greeley was here last 
week. 



Edna Foster, ex-'o4, is teaching in Nebraska. 

Bertha McKinnie, '03, was recently elected 
president of the College Woman's Club. This is 
a distinctive honor for Miss McKinnie as the 
njembership of the Club is partly composed of 
graduates from some of the leading universities 
and colleges of the East. 

Louise Dunbar, '04, is assistant principal of the 
High School at Wells, Minnesota. 

The Minerva Alumnae are strongly organized 
again this year. They meet once every two weeks 
and though the membership list is not a lengthy 
one, there is no lack of enthusiasm. They will 
soon begin the study of European cathedrals. 

Neva Armstrong, ex-'o5, is attending college at 
Grinnell, Iowa. 

Ada Seifried, '04, is taking a post graduate 
course at D. U. 



TIGER NOTES. 

William's Canon seemed very popular with the 
Seniors Saturday. 

Miss Florence McKee, of Denver, spent Sunday 
with Miss Johnston. 



"It is easy to roll off of a log if you once get 
on it." 

A crowd of girls went on a tramp through the 
Garden of the Gods, last Saturday. 

Mrs. J. E. Weir has been visiting her daughter 
for the past week. 

When you see girls laboriously climbing stairs, 
you do not need to ask them if they went to the 
Peak. 

Miss Margaret Sours, of Denver, was the guest 
of Miss Kidder over Saturday and Sunday. 

Miss Stiles and Miss Porter entertained the 
Freshman girls, who set at their table at a fudge 
party, Saturday evening. 

Miss Clara West, of Denver, has been visiting 
her sister. Miss Helen West. 

Miss West and Miss Kidder gace an informal 
dance Saturday evening in honor of their guests, 
Miss Clara West and Miss Sours. 

Miss Mabel Barbee received a visit from her 
father last week. 

Convergence and divergence is an interesting 
(' ?) subject. 



ic 



THE TIGHR 



Miss Lockhart gave a delightful informal dinner 
party Friday evening in honor of Miss Shuler. 
The guests were Miss Ethel Moore, Miss Yna 
Reinhardt, Miss Alice Kidder, Miss Mary Henry, 
Miss Mabel Barbee, Miss Evelyn Shuler and Miss 
Sours, of Denver. 

Hill — Why don't you brush your hat off, Mor- 
gan? 

Morgan — Because I want to keep it on. 

A number of the Contemporary girls, who live 
in Ticknor entertained the Freshman girls at a 
candy party Friday evening. 

Pay up promptly when the Barbecue committee 
comes around and then "get your money's worth." 



"Shorty" Randolph is suffering slightly from 
the long distance runs of Saturday last. 

There was a large (?) crowd at the depot to 
meet the football team. 

Will the Tiger's tail remain untwisted? Come 
and see. 

We miss Prexy and Dean Parsons. 

And we haven't had an ethical yet. 

Finney went to Golden Saturday. 

All out for basket-ball. 

Gym has commenced ! 



^^Il^4'4ll^^^^^^^^ 



SOCIETIES AND ASSOCIATIONS 



CONTEMPORARY CLUB. 

Friday, October 21. 
Jiujitsu, Elanor Pease. 
Violin Music, Mr. Nash. 
"Festivals and Ceremonies in Japan,' 
Johnston. 



Hannah 



HYPATIA. 



"Comparative Study of Internal Conditions 
Russia and Japan," Maude Smith. 

"Foreign Relations of Russia and Japan," 
Alice Meyers. 



2. Song, Zaidee Zinn. 

3. "Personality of Present Rulers," Clotilde 

Dubach. 



Y. W. C. A. 



Miss Eeidigh led the last meeting, taking for 
her subject, "Finding a Meaning in Life." 

The particular points brought out were, that we 
should make the most of our lives, to live as God 
would have us and in harmony with Him. 

It was shown that the influence of our lives is 
great ; that we should live in such a way as to be 
an example to others. 



Wil^WiVi^M^Jli'^PMVi^J^, 



ACADEMY DEPARTMENT 

Farle S. Alden Editor 

P . C. Merrill Athletic Editor 



OUR FIRST GAME 

C. H. S. 15; Cutler o. 

Outplaying their opponents at every point of 
the game, our team was defeated because of very 
bad tendency to fumble. 

At 3:10 Stuart kicked off to Wilfley who ad- 
vanced 10 yards to the 25-yard line, here the 
Academy was held for downs, and on Pueblo's 
first down penalized 5 yards for offside. Hart- 
man lost 15 on an end run, Stuart gained 7 on the 
pther end. Hartman took 5 through the line and 



lest 6 on end, then he gained 7 around end and 
Atterbury hit center with no gain. Hartman 
gained 4 through the line and Cutler took the ball 
on the 30-yard line. Tuttle made 6 through cen- 
ter, Allibrand 3 on a cross-buck, Tuttle 4 more on 
a line plungs and Allibrand 8 on a short end run. 
The ball as fumbled here but the next play Alli- 
brand made 6 one a short end run but Cutler lost 
the ball. 

Pueblo forced the ball steadily to the 5-yard 
line where the Academy held for downs and 
Graham punted, the ball going out on the 15- 
yard line. 



fHB TIGBR. 



it 



A quarter-back run netted Pueblo 5, Hartman 
made 2 on a line buck and broke away on the 
next play for a touch down. Hartman missed 
goal. C. H. S. 5; C. A. o. 

AUibrand kicked to the 30-yard line, Burr ran 
the ball back five. Stuart ran right end for 10, 
Hartman left for 5. Stuart made 4, again on end, 
and Hartman made 5 on a straight buck when he 
fumbled, Bentley securing the ball and gaining 10 
yards. AUibrand got 6 and the half ended with 
the ball on our 45-yard line. 

SECOND HAI.B'. 

Bernard replaced Bentley at left half back. 

Fisher caught the oval on the 15-yard line and 
advanced 10 yards lost 2 on a fumble and Hart- 
man punted to Wilfley who advanced 5 to the 2- 
yard line. By crossbuck the Academy made 
15 yards but were held for downs, Pueblo regain- 
ing this by mass plays when they were held for 
downs. 

Bernard made 8 through tackel and 2 more in 
the same place, then with splendid interference 
AUibrand circled left end for 30 yards. On the 
next play he fumbled and Hartman, getting the 
ball, ran 90 yards for a touch down, but missed 
goal. C. H. S. 10; C. A. o. 

On the kick-off Bernard made 15 to the 30- 
yard line but was badly hurt on the next play. 
AUibrand was tackled for a five yard loss and 
the umpire made it 5 more for offside. AUibrand 
then made 3 on tackle, Bernard 6 on end, Tuttle 3 
through center and Bernard 6 more on end. 
Though badly hurt at this point both Bernard and 
AUibrand stayed in the game. AUibrand fumbled 
on the next run and Wilfley tackled Stuart on the 
5 yard line after a 50-yard run. Here C. H. S. 
bucked the ball over and again failed goal. C. 
H. S. 15; C. A. o. 

Cutler kicked off to the 15-yard line, Fisher 
ran back 10 on the next play Cutler got the ball 
and when the whistle blew had it on Pueblo's 10- 
yard line. The student support was not what it 
should have been. The team needs good coach- 
ing and hard practice against the second team 
and the whole-hearted support of the student 
body. 

C. H. S. Positions — Graham — 

Johnson 1. e Graham 

Burr-Elliott 1. t Armstrong 

Beason 1. g Boyes 

Brown c Willet 

Copperhai r. g Moses 

Gaton r. t Haight 

Walker r. e McRae 

O'Donnel q Wilfley 

Stuart (c) 1. h Bernard-Bentley 

Atterbury f Tuttle 

Hartman r. h.. . . (c) Allibrand-Bentley 



C. S. H. S. 30; V. H. S. o. 

The High School defeated Victor in a very 
onesided battle on Washburn field Saturday 
n]orning. The game had better offensive work 
than defensive on both sides. The line work 
was not so good as it ought to have been. 

AT CRIPPLE CREEK. 

Centennial defeated the locals by the score of 
75-0. Moore, Walters and Graham did good 
work. 



"BETA SIGMA PHI." 

The "Beta Sigma Phi" society was organized 
among some of the girls of Cutler Academy last 
year. The initiations were held, on Friday and 
Saturday of last week. Those who were taken in 
are : Miss Hoffmire, Estill, Pierce, Lennox, 
Brigham and Masi. All day Friday they wore red 
and white leaves in their shoes and on their hair 
and were not supposed to talk to anyone except 
the charter members. 

Saturday afternoon the Society occupied two 
boxes at the football game. That evening, during 
the initiations, the members of the "Sigma" fra- 
ternity appeared on the scene with congratulations 
and cheers for the "Beta Sigma Phis." The in- 
itiations were ended with a spread at Miss Gile's 
which the charter members took a great deal of 
trouble to get up and which certainly did them 
credit. 



PHILO. 



Meeting for October 14: 

The program was in charge of Miss Lennox 
and Miss McCreery. 

The members each took part in reading the 
"Lay of the Last Minstrel," which was enjoyed 
very much by those present. 



HESPERIAN. 
Interest centered around the debate at the last 
meeting, though in addition to this there were 
three interesting numbers on the program. Jame- 
son read a paper on "Irrigation In the West," 
which was well written but rather indifferently 
delivered. Conklin did not seem to have suffi- 
ciently memorized his recitation, though he should 
be complimented upon his selection, one of Words- 
worth's beautiful poems. We have much to learn 
about declamation, but do not propose to neglect 
this side of our work this year. There was nothing- 
worthy of particular note in the debate, although 
Jackson's first appearance on the program gave 
evidence that in him the Society has material for 
a good debater. His manner is most convincing. 



TUB flCBK. 



Mr. Brehaut's criticism was, as usual, apposite 
It was perhaps the most appreciated number. 

Next Friday night the debate is to' be on the 
justice of Governor Peabody's action in deporting 
the Cripple Creek miners during the late trouble in 
Colorado. Hoover and Johnson will uphold Gov- 
ernor Peabody and their opponents will be Watts 
and McDonald. The program promises to be an 
interesting one and visitors are most cordially in- 
vited to be present. 



ACADEMY NOTES. 

An Academy Tennis Tournament seems to be 
assured. There are already some half dozen fel- 
lows who have entered. The Tournament will 
doubtless come just after the College tournament 
is finished. 



Several of the football boys from Pueblo were 
entertained over Sunday by the Sigma fellows. 

Carrick is a new fellow in the Academy. He is 
a promising candidate for a position on the foot- 
ball team. 

Kurie is able to be in school again, although his 
foot is still very lame. 

Many of the Cutler boys now bear brass tags 
a la mode. This in case they should be lost. 

Jones and Gile were in the party who went on 
the Peak excursion. 

Ross, C. A. ex-'o3, is at Leland Stanford this 
vear. 



Basket Ball candidates are beginning to "limber 
up" and are throwing baskets, etc., preparatory to 
the regular practice which will begin within a few 
v/eeks. 

Zenas Roberts, C. A. '02, was visiting about the 
campus for a day or two this week. 

Harman, '05, is a new Hesperian. 

There were several box parties at the Cutler 
Central game. 



Alumnae of the Academy were prominent at the 
game Saturday. Three cheers for the "ex-C. 
A.'s !" 

The editors will thankfully receive contributions 
of news, or literary matter, for our department 
of the Tiger. 



Students, if in need of glasses or repairs on 
same, see Ashby, the Optical Jeweler, the oldest 
established in the county. You will find every- 
thing right. 



*THE COLORADO ROAOT 




^^'"o^.ooiSouwt^*^"^ 



If you Want 

The 'Best, 

The QuicKc4:t, 
The Mo^i 

Saii^: factory 



Line to Denver or Pueblo buy a Colo- 
rado & Southern Ticket. Get them at 
City Office, i J N. Tejon. 

J. H. SPRINGER, Commercial Agent. 
Come in and ask questions. 



THB TIGBR. 



ij 



FresKmerk 

If you will call at 
our store we will 
be pleased to pre- 
sent you with a 

HANDSOME CARD CASE 

The W. B. DAVIS CLOTHING & FUR 
NISHING CO., 102 N. Tejon St, 



THE CRESCEM 

BOWLING ALLEYS 

115-117 North Cascade Ave. 

Telephone Main 863 



Private Alleys for Ladies 
Eight Alleys on one Floor 
Special Rates to Parties and Clubs 



2)r. 10. Jowler, 

DENTIST 

IS South TJejon St, 



G. W. Pauly, B. S., D. O. Mrs. Lona E. Fault, B. S. D. O. 

Graduates of A. T. Still's College of Osteopathy, 

Kirksville,Mo. 

DR. & MRS. PAULY, ?|\|?c7,^^T 

Office, rooms 303-304 DeGraff Bl(lfr. 118 N. Tejon St., Colo- 
rado Springs, Colo. Ph nes-Offico I.edl272; Res. Ked323 
Hours 8 to 12 a. m., 1 to 5 p. m. 



F. H. WEEKS 

26 East Bi|oa St. 

Artistic Portraits and 

all kinds of Photo- 

grapic Work 

special Rates to Students 



ne^t 



You are next to a good hair cut or shave when you patronize 



"^ ^^^ ^ The Manhattan Barber Shop, J. R. WEYMAR, Prop. 3o e. bijou 



WHITAKER & GARDNER 

30 N. TEJON ST. 

Headqtiaftef s for 

(E ollege Shoes 

OF EVERY DESCRIPTION 

We have the best mining and civil engineering boot 
in the m rket 

WHITAKER & GARDNER 




A^NDRy 



THE STAR is the leader for prompt! 
and satisfactory service. 

SPECIAL RATES to students of col- 
lege and academy 

S. E. BENNETT, College Ag't. 



SEE OIR 



College Pillow Tops window 

7 Views. Best Souvenir or Gift Yet 

Ashford & Roberts 

126 N. Tejon St. 

15 per cent discount to students on framing 



w. I. Lueas 



Columbia, Hartford, Rambler, Ideal & Tribune Bicycles 

The o'ly first-class re air shop in town. Chainless wheels 
a specialty. Wheels for rent. Phone 517- 1 1 29 N. Tejon 

Students Wishing a Special Course in Drawing, 

Water colors, Oil or China Paintings should call at 
ART STUDIO, io8 N. Tejon. MARION R. FORBISH, 

Member of Art Institute, Chicagfo. 



Every Stxidei^t 

Buy Shoes where the Style and 
PRICES ARE RIGHT 



J 115 



ENTITLED to a Special Discount on the best Shoes made at 
lis Soulh Tejon Street R. A. HANDY SHOE CO. 



14 



THE TIGER 











Colorado Coflege 






THE OLDEST INSTITUTION FOR 






HIGHER EDUCATION IN THE WEST 




FOUNDED AT COLORADO 




SPRINGS IN J874 




Colorado College now offers advantages of the same 




grade as the best institutions. 






For information concerning Courses of Study, Rooms 






and Board, Physical Culture, etc., apply to 






WM. F. SLOCUM, President, 






or EDWARD S. PARSONS, Dean. 






For information in regard to the College Department of 






Music, inquire of 






EDWARD S. PARSONS, Dean. 






Those wishing information as to the Courses in Drawing, 






Painting, Designing, etc., etc., inquire of 






EDWARD S. PARSONS, Dean. 






For information concerning the Engineering Depart- 






ment, apply to 






FLORIAN CAJORI, 






Dean of Engineering School. 




Cutler Academy 


Cutler Academy is the Associated Prepartory School of 




Colorado College, in which students are prepared for any 






American College. Address, 






M. C. GILE, Principal. 











THE TIGER 



15 



The Albert Sechrist Manufacturing Co. 

WILL INSTALL GAS and 



1033 16th 
Street 




ELECTRIC FIXTURES 

in your residence at Colorado Springs 
same price as Denver, without extra 
charge. Call and select your fixtures^ 
or will send you a catalogue. 



DENVLR, 
COLO. 




The Williafflson=Haffner 
Engraving Company 



1633 Arapahoe Street 



DENVER 



The 50-mile-an-hour Wheel 

Reading Standard Bicycles 



SflEFF & RIGGS: 



Opposite Plaza Hotel 



S^erkins Crockerj/ Co. 

r. A. PERKINS, Manager 

120 7f. Vojon St. 

^ to agon Load of ^ ^ 

Nc^w Wood Type 

Atxd Other Ms^teriacls 

O/" the -Very JLa1e4;t at 
your X>isposcil _for 

Wirvdow Ca^rds 
Tickets, Flyers £££ 

E, JSf CRA V I jsr G — U he Finest 

TKe Telegraph Job Rooms 119 e. p. p. Ave. 

Ask wKere TK© Tiger Is Printed 



USE THE 
Colorado Midland 

in Going to 

Utah, 

California 

and the 

West 



Best Line to Colorado Po nts 

T')z>o trains daily Den'ver to 
Salt Lake City 

H. C. BUSH C. H. SPEERS, 

Traffic Mgf . G. P. A. 

R. T. DUNAWAY, C. P. A. 
Colorado Springs. 




JOHIN MOFFAT 

Tine Cailoring 

Repairing, Cleaning, Pressing. Special rates to 

College Students 
Over Waiting's Book Store 16 South Tejon St 

VEB WIING 



24 E. Kiowa St. 



Colorado Springs, Colo. 



NEW EMPIRE THEATRE 3 shows Daily -« l Matinee 3 p. M. 

Evenings 7:30 and 8:45 



IOC 



VAUDEVILLE- 



lOC 



i6 



THE TIGER. 



El Paso Cleaning & Tailoring Co. 

10 E. Kiowa St. Phone Main 667=A Colo. Springs 



Pressing Dyeing Altering 

Cleaning Repairing Tailoring 



Prof. Chas. J. Hausdorf 

TEACHER OE MANDOLIN, GUITAR AND BANJO 

Music furnished for weddings, receptions, 

entertainments, etc. 

21 North Tejon. 



Office Phone 309-B 



Residence Phone Red 871 



DR. HARRY L MOREHOUSE 

DENTIST 



Hours 9-12, 1:30-5 



rirst Ncit'l Bank BIdg., room 8 



C. E. Arcularius & Co. 
Sewekrs 

Diamonds and Watches 

Fine Jewelry Manufacturing 

9 South Tejon St. Colorado Springs 

The 

Crissey & Eowler Lumber 
Company 

Phone 101 117 to 123 West Vermijo Ave. 

For 'Prompt atteniion and Satisfactory 
Work, patronize the 

Monarch Hand 
Laundry 

KARL L. MOHLER, Prop. 
W. J. WALLRICH, College Agt. 

A perfect fiUing shirt necessitates hand %>ork 
Phone 540 329 E. Pikes Peak Ave. 

FINE CHOCOLATE BON BONS 



Name on every Piece 

Ice Cream, Hot and Cold 
Sodas 

Tresh Candies madeexery hour 



UNION ICE AND COAL COMPANY 

W. M. BANNING, Prop. 




goal, mood atid Tec 

Dealers in all kinds of Coal and Artificial and 
Natural Ice 

Yard Office, 105. W. Vermijo Ave. City Office, 5 N. Tejon 




Moles and Superflous Hair removed with Electricity 
Hair Goods made to Order 

lUrs^ jfltina Betbman, 

HAIR DRESSING PARLORS 

27 E. Kiowa Phone Red 394 Ladies Bath 

Colorado Springs, Colo. 



Carriages, Cabs, 

'Busses, Baggage and 

Transfer Wagons 

Office, 15 North eascade 



Denver Law School 

Law Department of the 
University of Denver 

Three years' course leading to the degree of 
Bachelor of Laws. Courses in Mining and Irri- 
gation Law. Full resident faculty. For informa- 
tion address 

LLCIIS W. HOYT, Dean 

Ernest & Cranmer BIdg., Denver, Colo. 

Did You Know 

That our stock of package crackers is so 
great in its variety that you could have a 
change for every day for more than two 
months and yet not exhaust our list? Well, 
it's a fact. We have a kind for every pos- 
sible time and occasion — and they are all 
good. Finest bakery goods in the city. 
Fancy Groceries 

W. N. BIRGESS, 112 N. Tejon St. 

Titsworth & Davidson 
DAIRY 

2 MILES S. E. OF CQLORADO SPRINGS. P. 0. BOX 6 

The Honck'Davidson Coal and Transfer Co. 

Dealers In 

CANON CITY, MAITLAND 

AND LIGNITE COAL 

Phone 473-B. Office US N. Tejon. P. O. Box 275 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 



*4>^«i'«l*«i*<i**i>4*4>4>«i*4>4*4'*i**i*4*4>«i>4*«i*4»*i'4*4*«i*«i>4*«i>4><ii4*4>«i'*i»4'4'«i*4»«i*4*4»4*4'4> 

1* 



\ See 



'She Gowdy-Simmons Printing Company 

FOR WINDOW CARDS, TICKETS, ETC. ENGRAVED 
CARDS AND INVITATIONS ON SHORT NOTICE 



21 Tforth ♦ 

4* 

TJejon JV. 4. 

4* 




COTRELL & LEONARD, 

ALBANY. N. Y. 

Makers of CAPS and GOWNS 

to American Colleges and 

Universities 



THE DERN TEA AND COFFEE CO. * 

Dealers in TEAS, COFFEES, SPICES, * 

EXTRACTS, BAKING POWDERS, Etc. J 

4* 
Phone 575 29 S. Tejon St. ^ 

4. 



The PeopIe^s Gfocefy and Market 



PHONE MAIN 868 




S. JAMES & SON, Props, 



222 EAST PIKE'S PEAK 



Colorado Springs, Colorado 



ST. JOHN & BARNES 

Oldest and largest plumbing and heating 

establishment in city. Your 

patronage solicited 



Telephone 13 



206 N. Tejon St. 



Phone Main 151 



Established 1897 



P. W. SMITH 

FAMILY GROCER, TEA AND 
COFFEE MERCHANT . : : : : 
Orders Called for and Promptly Delivered 

731 N. Weber St. Colorado Springs, Colo. 




"The Sign of Good Coal" 

The Colorado Springs 

F\iel Co. 1 12 Pike's Peak Av. 



TELEPHONES 230. 213 



For 6eodness Sake<&i& 

Use TUDOR lower vein Coal 
It beats all other Lignite 

TUDOR COAL COMPANY, Cor. Cascade and Cucharas 

(Ask your dealer for 

VICTOR 

Athletic 
Supplies 





10 Per Cent. OFF TO ALL STUDENTS ON DOUGUS 
SHOES. DOUGLAS SHOE SfORE. 



USE ELECTRIC LIGHT 
IN YOUR HOMES 



The Colorado Springs Electric Co. 



4* 



4*4»4>«i*4*4»«i»4>*i»4*4*4i4*4>4*4*4>4>4»4»4»4*4*<i»4*4»4*<i"i*4'4**i*4*4>4*4»4>«i'4>4»4i4>*i*<i« 

4* 

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The Yo'un^ Nen^s Store* 

1B2^c Ha^Ve Introduced 

Several new and exclusive styles, especially suitable 
for college young men this fall. Our "Harvard" and 
"University" styles in suits are particularly new and 
attractive. The set of the collar and shoulders of 
these garments are very pleasing. Let us show you 
these new styles. :: r: :: :: :: :: 



SPECIAL DISCOUNT 
TO ALL STUDENTS 



HOLBROOK & PERKINS 



THE DENVER FIRE CLAY CO. 

MANliFACTlJRERS OF 
AND DEALERS IN 

Chemical and Physicial Apparatus and Chemicals 

A FULL LINE OF LABORATORY SUPPLIES AND ASSAY GOODS 
Write for Illustrated Catalogues 



* 1742-1746 Champa Street, 



DENVER, COLORADO 



Excellent !r/iotoffraphs 

at BINGHHM & WOOD'S. 18 S. Tejon 

H. C COLBURN, Pres. E. A. COLBURN, Jr., Sec'y and Treas. 

The \^irtler>s \yixiiomohile Co. 

LIVERY. STORAGE, R.EPAIRING 

Telephone Main 122 S-IO JV. /ie-Oada A-Oe. Colorado Springs, Colo. 




O. E. HEMENWAY 



Groceries and Meats 



us South Tejon St 
Colorado Springs^ Colorado 




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im TIGBR 



Colorado College 



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OCTOBE:R.27tH, 1904 

VOL\/M£ V//. JVumber 7. 



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♦ ♦4»4'4i4*4>4*4>4»4i4*4>4>4>4*4*4»4»4»4*4> 

Special Rates to Students 

6n Rented Pianos 




The KNIGHT ^eHMPBELL 
Music Company 



New Lennox Block 



Opposite North Park 



St. John Bros-r"'"'™'"' 

Gas and Steam Fitters 

Hot Water Heating a Specialty 

Prompt attention given to Repair Work. 



♦Curtis (2'oal Co. 



Office 132 N. Teion St. Telephone 91. 

Try "NEW RANGE" for the Kitchen, $400. 
BiTUMNOus Coal at Standard Prices. 



SELDOMRIDGE BROTHERS, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

Flour, Feed, Grain, Hay and Seeds 

108 South Tejon Street 

4» Repairing while You Wait Satisfaction Guaranteed 

^ A complete plant of New Machinery for 

. the Manufacture of Fine Boots and Shoes 

4» The Lightning Shoe Shop 

* BROWN & c; O M P A N Y 

4* We make a specialty of Shoes to Measure and Shoes for 

4* Cripples. 28V4 North Tejon St. Coloraoo Springs 

♦ Visiting Card> in Latest Styles. 

X Vftll ^^ advertising in THE TiGER that we 

^ lUl) appreciate your custom. 

4» /^ 22 E. Kiowa St. Thc Pfompt Printerj 

4* . 

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The 

Massed Iron Works Co. 



-Founders and Machinists 



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2l/e Tl/elcome 



THE STUDENTS, 

new and old, at our studio, 

Corner Cascade and Kiowa 




^^nmt X 



Dealer in Kodaks and Supplies. 



COLLEGE GOWNS, CAPS 

The Best Workmanship 
at Lowest Prices 

Silk Faculty Gowns and Hoods 




COX SONS & VINING 

262 Fourth Avenue., NEW YORK 



F00T BALLS 

Pants, Nose Guards, 
Tennis Goods 
and Sweaters 



at Strangs 

119 North Tefon Street 



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Mueth's 

Soda, Ice eream 

eATERING ♦ 

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CHAS^ T. FERTIG % 

^al Estate, Loans and Insurance J 

29 N, Tejon Street X 



TJhe Colorado ^pr/nys J^iorai Co* 

FLORISTS 



704! ^oriA "ZTo/on Straof - 



DOVGLrAS est HETHCRINGTON 



Phone 556-B 
•J* "I* v *•* v *i* ^ 1* *•* V *•* 



Rooms 15-16 Outwest Building, Colorado Springs, Colo. * 
4*4>4>4»4*4*4>4>4*4»4>4>4*4*4'4»4*4»4*4*4*4*4*4*4'4*4»4*4»4»4*4* 



THE TIGER. 



Student's Book Store Books, stationery; an Engi- 

neer's Supplies; College Pins 



and Watch Fobs, 
and up. 



Century Fountain Pens $1 to $4, Waterman's $2.50 

REYER & PLATT. 



For $i 00 D6r month ' ^"'^ sponged and Pressed each week 
---^ £- PANTATORIIM, 



17 East Bijou, Branch Office opp. Plaza Hotel. 



THE COLORADO SPRINGS CO. 

The Original Locators of 

Colorado Springs and 9/fanitou 

is still offering for sale choice 
lots on North Weber Street 
and North Wahsatch Avenue 

Also lots for sale in other parts of Colorado Springs 
and in Manitou 

Apply at ROOMS, OUTWEST BUILDING 



LOUIS ST©eK 



steam Dye and Cleaning 
Works 



Office and Works, US N. Tcjon St. 

TELEPHONE 517-B 

Cleaning, Dyeing, Scouring in all its branches 

Ostrich Plumes Cleaned, Dyed and Curled 

Kid Gloves Dyed and Cleaned. 



GIDDINGS BROS. 



FINE DRESS GOODS AND LADIES' 

TAILOR SUITS, Ladies' 

FURNISHINGS 



Kiowa and Tejon Streets. 



CHARLES P. BENNETT 

Real Estate, Loans 
and Insurance*^ ^ 

NO. 5 PIKE'S PEAK AVENUE 

D, E. MONROE & CO. 
Prescription Druggist 

The best of Drugs, Stationery and Toilet Articles 

NO LIQUORS SOLD. 
Cor. Tcioii S( Bijou Phone 311 * 331 

THE HEFLEY-ARCILARIIS DRIG CO. 
Druggists 

Kodaks, Cameras and all kinds of Photographic 
Supplies. Developing and Printing for Amatuers. 
Free Delivery. 
Phone 144 21 South Tejon Street 



liardivarc Bicycles 

fl. S. BLHKE 

New Chainless Bicycle $35 and $20 
Rambler, Orient and National Automobiles 

Best Kepair Shop in city 107 n. Ceion 

nirs. R. K« brooks 

Coilet Parlors at 20 East Kiowa 

Also Room 52, Antlers Hotel 

No Apprentices. Only experienced help employed. 

A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 

Largest Manufacturers in Ihe World of Official 
Athletic Supplies 

The football supplies manufactured by A. G. SPALD- 
ING & BROS, are the best that can absolutely be produc- 
ed; they are of superior make; they have stood the test fo ■ 
over twenty-eight years, and are used by all intercollegiate, 
interscholastic and prominent football teams o the 
country. 

SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOTBALL GUIDE. Edited 
by Walter Camp. Contains the NEW RULES for 1904. 
Price, 10 cents. 

SPALDING'S HOW TO PLAY FOOT BALL . Edi ed by 
Walter Camp. Newly revised for 1904. Pri e 10 cents. 

"If it pertains toaihletic^we make it." 

A. G. SPAiiitNG & BROS. 

New York, Chicago, Denver San Francisco, St. Louis 

Send for aco y of Spalding's Fall and Winter 

Sports Catalogue. It's Fr e. 

HENRY TAMM 

Druggist 

PRESCRIPTIONS 
TOILET ARTICLES 
STATIONERY 

All Popu'ar Drinks Served 
at our Soda Fountain 

Plaza Hotel, Cor. Cache la Poudre & Tejon Sts. 

THE RUGBY=PRmROSE COAL CO. 



All Kinds of Fuel 



Phone 481-A 



West 44-A 



21 N. TEJON ST. 



H.KRANZ 



peRCELaix 
H. KRflNZ & 

Only 8 Chair Barber Shop in the City 

lObH B. Pike's Peak ftve. 



BATHTUBS P. R. SMITH 

CO., Barbers 

Try the lectric Vibrassage Machine 
eOLGRADO SPRINGS. COLG. 



THE TIGER. 



FITS ^ ^ CORRECTLY 

COFT&iaHTBD. 

It Saves You Money and Time 

When I examine your eyes or fit your glasses. My NEW 
METHOD is perfection beyond a doubt. Consultation 
Free. DR. SCHADT, O. D. 

Eyesight Specialist. 
Office 303 Colorado Bldg., cor. Tejon and Huerfano 



Use Gas 



We sell a GOOD FOUNTAIN PEN for $i 

WHITNEY & GRIMWOOD 

Opera House Building 

We are agents for WATERMAN'S IDEAL FOUNTAIN 
PENS. Prices from $2.50 up. 



Watchmaker and Jeweler 

15 South "Uejon St. 




AND 




1739 Champa St., DENVER, COLO. 



C. W. WARSOP & CO.. 



205 N. Tejon St. 



Draperies, Upholstery Goods, Furniture. Complete line of Screens, 
Pillows, Pillow Tops, Couch Covers, etc. 



The 



Denver 



BrySoo4$eo 



Denver 



FRANK F. CRUMP 

FLORIST 

Phone 500 509 E. Columbia St. 

Special attention given to Telephone Orders. 



H. E. BOATRIGHT 

Public Stenographer 

33 GIDDINGS BLDG. 
Rates 5c per 100 words, 50c per hr. extra carbons 5c per page 



The eox Shoe 60. 

107 S. Tejon St. Colorado Springs, Colo. 
J. M. eex 



LADIES, MISSES AND CHILD- 
REN'S SHOES 

MEN'S, YOUTHS' AND BOYS' 
SHOES 



FRANK H. SMALL watches, Diamonds, fine Watch Work. Special 
Jeweler and Silversmith P"ce to Students. 113 Pike's Peak Ave. 



nhe TIGCR 



Vol. VII. 



COLORADO COLLEGE. OCTOBER 27. 1904. 



No. 7 



AN UNKNOWN HERO 



It was the opening day of the State museum. 
The Capital City had donned her gala attire for 
the great occasion. People came from far and 
near to view the precious treasures so long con- 
cealed from public gaze, and long before the doors 
were thrown open the street adjoining the main 
entrance was thronged with curious on-lookers, 
some chattering, some laughing, and others, at- 
tracted by the crowd, standing mute, eagerly 
drinking in the little bits of stories told by the 
more enthusiastic. 

If any one noticed the stooped figure of an old 
man crouched timidly against the huge stone pil- 
lar nearest the door, it was with but a passing 
glance. No one noticed the anxiety in his steel 
grey eyes. No one knew the flutterings of his 
feeble heart. No one guessed that his fingers 
were not trembling with age but tingling with 
excitement. And yet, had ©ne looked at him but 
a moment longer he could have seen all, for his 
emotions were so plainly written on his pale face 
that the most casual observer would have been 
moved to pity and kindness toward him. 

No one knew, though, and as the great crowd 
surged into the building, he was pushed hither 
and thither like a lost child. Suddenly his face 
lighted up. His eyes danced and he seemed pos- 
sessed of a new life. He pushed his way with 
the strength of a youth to a group of spectators 
in the farthest corner of the room, and there 
he gazed long and steadily into a case filled with 
banners and flags. Presently he turned away. 
The happy smile had disappeared and a shade of 
disappointment clouded his face. He was about 
to wend his way from the room when the voice of 
the custodian attracted his attention, and these 
words reached his ear : "Yes, I am a Confederate, 
and it does my old soul good to tell the history of 
that little flag. It was in the midsummer of '64 
when Missouri was plunged into the struggles of 
the Civil War. Strife and disaster were every- 
where. A Confederate colonel was sent into the 
northwestern part of the state to gather recruits 
for the Confederate army. He captured my home 
town, Seville, and then moved six miles north to 
Scranton and encamped in a woodland pasture 
near by. The next day about noon, owing to de- 
fective picket posts, the Federal troops, to. the 
number of about fifteen hundred, were allowed to 
aporoach within three hundred yards before there 



was any intimation that they were near the camp. 
This created the utmost consternation among the 
raw recruits, and they scattered indiscriminately. 
A certain sergeant gathered together about twenty 
men and rode out to check the enemy. As he 
dashed by headquarters, the battle flag, which 
had been presented to the command the day be- 
fore, was fluttering from the staff. The sergeant 
snatched it from the pole and carried it at the 
head of his troopers into the town, where he 
made a brave stand until, with one exception, his 
men were all killed. Finding it impossible to 
save himself and the flag too, he threw it into the 
front of an open store house, but before he could 
escape the Yankees got him. The flag and I were 
the only Confederates saved. I cannot tell you 
more, friends, bu'" on the records above there is 
the name of one brave soldier who is not recorded 
here below." 

A prolonged hush followed the conclusion of 
the story, and the old custodian wiped the tears 
from his failing eyes. The crowd passed on, but 
the old man remained leaning upon the case. His 
eyes were fixed on the floor and he seemed 
not to hear the careless throng around him. A 
flush came over his pale face, and the trembling 
left his hands. Slowly he raised his head and 
looked once more at the shattered flag: 

"Yes, that is the same," he murmured. 

M. A. B., '06. 



THE BARBECUE. 

For twelve or fourteen years it has been a cus- 
tom of this College for the Sophomores to give 
a Barbecue on Hallowe'en night. At first the 
crowd in attendance from the College was small, 
although the number of those present was swelled 
by most of the small boys within a radius of five 
miles. 

In those first Barbecues the whole operation of 
barbecuing the meat was done in the presence of 
the people during the evening. As the years went 
on, however, the crowd grew, and there were so 
many hungry mouths that the barbecuing of the 
meat had to be done beforehand. 

Of course at these affairs speeches had to be 
made, so it has become the custom to have a few 
short speeches, as humorous as possible. And 
then, with the introduction of a Glee Club into 



THE TIGER. 



College some six or seven years ago, music was 
added to the program. 

Of course, even with the actual barbecuing of 
the meat done earlier, the big bonfire has always 
been a feature, and the dancing and singing 
around it after the "spread" and speeches. 

Now, does the College think that the Sopho- 
mores do all this, and take the trouble to get it 
up, just on good will, wishes and amicable feel- 
ing from other classes ? It takes something 
more solid than these to pay bills, as the present 
Freshmen will find next year. The Juniors have 
their last year's trials in mind, and have sub- 
scribed quite loyally to the maintenance of this 
College custom. The Seniors have apparently 
almost all forgotten that they ever had to help 
run a Barbecue. The Freshmen seem quite 
evenly diveded between those who wish to loy- 
ally support the College affairs, and those who 
have not the slightest interest in College be- 
sides sitting in class. 

The present Sophomore class has received a 
smaller subscription than has been given for three 
years past. To maintain the standards of ex- 
cellence of two years ago and last year it must 
have more money. Seniors, won't you help at 
least a little; and Freshmen, you will have it to 
to go through next year ; '07's best supporters 
so far are the Juniors. Draw your deductions. 
This is a College affair. Everyone chip in and 
help. 

THE ETHICAL ADDRESS. 

The subject of President Slocum's remarks 
last Friday morning was "Independence of Char- 
acter." He said in part : 

Students feel a sort of independence of char- 
acter. When away from home and restraining 
influences, a certain self-reliant spirit asserts it- 
self. And this self-reliance or independence of 
character is a good thing, provided it is the right 
kind of independence. What a person is in his 
inner self is what counts. That is what forms 
the ultimate test, and this is what constitutes 
character. Reputation is what others think of us, 
but character is what we really are, regardless 
of the opinions of others. The foundation for 
reputation is largely our outward life, but char- 
acter is founded and built upon our inner life. A 
good reputation is a splendid thing, but a good 
character is vastly better. But if character is 
\Ahat we really are, what do we mean by "inde- 
pendence of character." Independence of char- 
acter is the standing for what is right and true, 
icgardless of the opinions of others. A sneak 
or a coward has no independence of character, 
for he has not the courage to stand by his con- 
victions. There are two things which go to 
make up this so-called "independence of charac- 



ter." These two things are, first, our own inner 
life, and second, our own opinions ; or, in other 
words, character itself, and courage. Not only 
have opinions, but stand by them. This policy 
may lead to unpopularity, but even though pop- 
ularity is a good thing : it is vastly better to be 
r.npopular and right. Many great men have 
been misunderstood and despised. History is 
full of examples of men and women who were 
not appreciated till dead. But this often consti- 
tutes greatness. Therefore, stand for your own 
opinions if you think they are right. But do not 
be a bigot nor a narrow-minded egotist. When 
weighing your own opinions have a high regard 
and esteem for the opinions of others. Use ev- 
ery opportunity within your reach to find out 
what is true and correct, and then form your 
opinions, and furthermore, stand by them. Then 
you have "independence of character." 



THE REPUBLICAN CLUB. 

Last Thursday evening an enthusiastic band 
of young men met and formed the Republican 
Club of Colorado College. The club is rapidly 
growing, and will be an important factor in 
arousing enthusiasm in the coming campaign. 
Tuesday evening at the big rally the club occu- 
pied a prominent position in the torchlight par- 
ade. The following officers have been elected : 
Keyes, President; Hester, Vice President, and 
Wasley, Secretary-Treasurer. The club will hold 
several rallies before election, and the issues, both 
state and national, will be thoroughly discussed. 
The members have pledged themselves to vote 
for Peabody and President Roosevelt. 



THE UTAH DEBATE. 

The subject for the Utah debate is here, "Re- 
solved, That the closed shop system is beneficial 
to American industry." By "closed shop system" 
i= meant that union shops shall hire union men 
only, and non-union shops non-union men only. 

It has seemed best to let our team choose the 
sides, and so the preliminaries will probably be 
held on November 11. This, however, is not 
yet certain. All who intend trying for the team 
should begin work at once. There should be at 
least nine men trying for the debate. Please hand 
your names to Givens, and the side you are going 
to take in the preliminaries, at once. 



NOTICE. 



The preliminary for the Freshman-Sophomore 
prize contest in declamation will be held No- 
vember 22, the final contest December 14. Those 
who intend to enter, see Mr. DeWitt about it 
at once. 



THE TIGER. 



BOOKS RECENTLY RECEIVED. 

t'ROM WALTER F. CROSBY, 

Histories of the United States— 

By Goodrich. 

By Higginson. 

By Lard. 

By Quackenbos. 
Histories of England — 

By Yonge. 

By Montgomery. 

By Codman & Kendall. 

By Hume. 
History of France, by Markham. 
Histories of Rome — 

By Liddell. 

By Creighton. 
Swinton's Outlines of the World's History. 
Plattner's Manual of Qualitative and Quantitative 

Analysis. 
Diagrams in Crystallography, T. Eggleston. 
A Geographical Atlas, by Johnston. 
Formes' Chemistry. 
Gage's Elements of Physics. 

Egleston's Tables for the Determination of Nu- 
merals. 
Bowen's Introduction to Modern French Lyrics. 
Larousse's Exercises d'Orthographe et de Syn- 

taxe. 
Dana's Manual of Geology. 

Egleston's Tables to Illustrate Metallurgical Lec- 
tures. 
Fresenin's Quantitative Chemical Analysis. 
Scott & Denny Composition — Rhetoric. 
Wentworth's Plane and Solid Geometry. 
Wentworth's Algebra. 
Gillespie's Land Surveying. 
Scudder's Latin Reader. 
La Premiere Annee de Grammaire, par Mm. 

Larive et Flenry. 
Union Bible Dictionary. 
Greenleaf's National Arithmetic. 
Egleston's Lectures of Mineralogy. 
Cook's Otto's German Grammar. 
Blass's Ancient History. 

A dozen Bibles and two copies of the Book of 
Common Prayer. 

PURCHASED. 

Branch's The Hamilton Speaker. 
Lord Kelvin's Baltimore Lectures. 
Two copies of Hobhouse's Mind in Evolution. 



Two scholarly books by professors in Colorado 
College have recently come from the press. These 
are "An Introduction to the Modern Theory of 
Equations," by Florian Cajori, head professor of 
mathematics. It is a volume of about 240 pages, 
and is published by The Macmillan Company of 
New York. It is prepared for the use of ad- 



vanced college students and beginners in gradu- 
ate work. This work has just appeared. 

The other work is a "Spanish Grammar," by 
E. C. Hills, professor of Romance languages in 
Colorado College, and Professor J. D. M. Ford 
of Harvard University. The Grammar is pub- 
lished by D. C. Heath & Co. of Boston, and is 
prepared for use in colleges and secondary schools. 
It is already being used at Colorado College, the 
University of Colorado and several high schools 
in this State, and it is being largely adopted by 
the colleges and universities of the East and 
West. 



STARCH IN THE TIGER TAIL. 

Yes, the thing to do is to put so much starch 
into the Tiger tail that it will be as stiff as a 
poker, and then not even Boulder will be able 
to tie a knot in it. Cripples? Yes, to be sure, 
wc have got some, and that's to be expected. 
Who ever heard of a victory being won without 
somebody getting hurt? But we have closed up 
the ranks, and our friends the enemy will be 
greeted by some mighty lively yellow tom-cats 
when they come down to play in our back yard on 
Saturday. Won't it be exciting? Every moth- 
er's son of us (and every father's daughter) will 
be down on the field with a voice and a flag. 
When the Tigers plunge through for a gain or 
when they gallop around the end we will jump 
up and yell and wave our flags. The bleachers 
will go mad. And when the bleachers go mad those 
eleven Tigers down on the gridiron will grit their 
teeth and dig their toes into the ground, and the 
blood will course through their veins like fire, and 
each will have the strength of ten, and they will 
sweep Boulder down the field to defeat. Hurray ! 
Be on hand with the starch. M. E. 



The two events which are never missed by 
any loyal or sane students are coming within a 
week; first, the game with Boulder, and the 
Barbecue Monday night to celebrate. BRING 
YOUR OWN TINCUF! 



HYPATIA. 



One of the prettiest and most enjoyable func- 
tions of the year was that of Saturday afternoon, 
when Hypatia was delightfully entertained at the 
home of Mrs. Urdahl, who is the patroness of 
the society. After a most interesting talk on the 
student life and university customs of Germany, 
Mrs. Urdahl sang in the charming way in which 
she always delights her auditors. Miss Smith's 
music was thoroughly enjoyed by everyone. As- 
sisting were Miss McDowell, who presided at the 
samovar, and Miss Ball, who served the ice. 



fHB fiG&R. 



THE TIGER 

Published weekly during the College year by 
The Tiger Publishing Co., in the interest of Colo- 
rado College. 

J. Y. Crothers Editor-in-Chief 

T. Hunter Assistant Editor-in-Chief 

J. I. Muffley Athletic Editor 

Miriam Carpenter Literary Editor 

Mabel Barbee Alumni Editor 

A. H. Fisher Local Editor 

Bert Wasley Business Manager 

C. A. Hedblom .... Assistant Business Manager 

CORRESPONDENTS: 

Mr. Nash, Miss McDowell, Miss Isham, Miss 
Kidder, Mr. Lamb, Mr. Reeks, Miss Arbuckle. 

Subscription, $1.25 per year, payable in advance. 
Single copy, 5 cents. 

The Tiger is forwarded to all subscribers until 
ordered discontinued and all arrcaranges are paid. 

Students, Professors and Alumni are invited 
to contribute literary articles, personals and items. 
Contributions must be accompanied by the writer's 
name. 

Address all communications to The Tiger, 
Colorado College, Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Entered at the Postoffice at Colorado Springs, 
Colo., as second-class matter. 



Patronize Tiger Advertisers 



EDITORIAL 

U. OF C. VS. C. C. 

MEXT Saturday comes the greatest game of 
the season in football for the College. It is 
the only championship game to be played on 
Washburn Field this year. It is the last chance 
for most of the upper two classes to see a Boul- 
der game, and the first chance for most of the 
lower two classes. Every student owes it to 
himself and to his College to be on Washburn 
Field Saturday afternoon, and to bring his voice 
along. If by any hook or crook you can beg, 
borrow or — earn the money, be on hand. It has 
been charged against the College in the past few 
years that College spirit was dead among us. 
The charge has been only too true. When a 
team was winning, a feeble expression of satis- 
faction was forthcoming, but if our teams lost 
there was a very violent knocking aroused. The 
very time a team needs encouragement is when 
it is in a hole. The cries of "Hold 'em" should 
be more lusty than those of "Touch-down." 
Last year at a Chapel meeting it was suggested 



that if a person Came around after the game and 
asked what the score was, he should be socially 
ostracised by the whole school. "Them's our 
sentiments, too," but in addition next Monday 
night at the Barbecue, such persons might get an 
extra toss in the blanket. 

The advance sale of tickets to students is 40 
cents for admission to the field, 25 cents extra 
for the grandstand. On the day of the game ad- 
mission to the field will be 75 cents for everyone, 
and 25 cents for the grandstand. 

BUY YOUR TICKETS BEFORE SATUR- 
DAY. 



THE UTAH DEBATE. 

"THE question for the interstate debate with 
Utah has arrived. This is only the second 
debate we have held with the University of 
Utah, the one last year being won by our hon- 
orable opponents on their own rostrum. The 
honor of the College should be upheld by the 
best men available, and these men should begin 
work on the question at once. We know that 
the debate this year will be no "cinch," but believe 
tha' our men can land a victory for old C. C. 
Enough men to form both first and second teams 
must enter the preliminaries in order to insure 
success. 



A PROTEST. 



Why do we permit the small street urchin to 
t:;ke possession of our athletic field during a 
game. At the Alumni game the small boy was 
not worse than usual, but the field was his. 
During the first half some twenty or thirty of 
them spent the time playing marbles directly in 
front of the grandstand. They were not willing 
to play their marbles outside, but preferred to 
come in and occupy the most conspicuous place. 
During the second half they had a little game of 
football of their own on the field ; they ran up 
and down the steps of the grandstand, sat on the 
front rail, threw stones and hurdle frames at one 
another, hoisted hats and sticks up the flagstaff, 
ran across the field near the teams, and did gen- 
erally as they pleased. And the small boy was 
not the only offender. Time and again a crowd 
of men and boys stood many feet inside the line, 
sc that they had to run to get out of the way of 
the players more than once. Incidentally, they 
also obstructed the view from the grandstand. 

Why do we permit all this? Why are the 
gates thrown open to the public after the first 
half? Why aren't the people that do not pay 
kept out? And if the small boy wriggles in 
some way or other, why do we not teach him to 
keep out of the way? Why are any save offi- 



THB TIGBR. 



cials, members of the teams and the reporters 
allowed in front of the grandstand or near the 
line at all? Why isn't some one responsible? 
Why is there so little feeling for law and order 
on the athletic field? The team is playing good, 
hard ball, and deserves all credit. The people 



in the grandstand pay for admission and wish to 
see the game. Why do we permit men and boys 
tc crowd on the side line, sit on the front rail 
of the grandstand and get in everybody's way? 
That sort of thing is not permitted in the East. 
Can't we put a stop to it here? 




^ S f^f04f4f4f4f4f^f4Mf^f^ 



ATHLETIC 
DEPARTMENT 



Varsity 5 — Second Team 



The Alumni viewed the situation from afar 
and decided that this year's Tigers are much 
fiercer, so they concluded that they would not 
take the risk. This gave the second team a 
chance to see what could be done against the 
team that is on Saturday to represent Colorado 
College against Boulder. 

It was a good game and showed well what the 
defects are in the team. Coach Juneau played 
during the first half, but during the rest of the 
game he coached the teams. Glynn, Roberts, 
Howbert and Fisk did great work. Glynn's end 
runs and line bucks were up to the standard. 
Roberts was a tower of strength in the line and 
often tackled the backs before the play was well 
started. Howbert played his usual good game at 
tackle and distinguished himself by doing the best 
line plunging seen on Washburn Field since the 
Aggies were here a year ago. Fisk is little, but 
his speed and aggressiveness place him as one 
of our six good halfbacks. Captain Lennox in 
the absence of both Randolph and Johnston 
played quarter. He handled the ball well, but 
we should like to hear Shorty's voice and see his 
confident figure on the field. Shorty is an es- 
sential. 

Glynn kicked to Scibird on the 5-yard line. 
Scibird returned the ball 15 yards. The second 
team was unable to gain, and Juneau dropped 
back for a punt, but made 15 yards on a bad 
pass. The varsity again held, and by line plunges 
and end runs the ball was placed on the 5-yard 
line. On the next play Glynn shot through tackles 
for the touchdown. Lennox missed goal. Score : 
Varsity 5, Scrubs o. 

Nead kicked to Howbert, who ran the ball 
back 10 yards. By steady plunges the varsity 



carried the ball to their opponents' 25-yard line, 
where the ball was lost on a fumble. The second 
team took a brace and made two first downs, 
when it again behooved them to kick. Vories 
again made a bad pass, and Juneau was downed. 
Gibbs made 3 yards, and Seybold 5. Glynn hit 
tackle for 10, but on the next play the ball was 
lost on a fumble, and the second team kicked 
out of danger. The half ended with the ball in 
the varsity's possession in midfield. 

In the second half the second team but once 
had the ball in the varsity's territory, while no 
less than five times did the varsity place the 
ball on the lo-yard line only to lose it every time 
on fumbles. Lennox from the 25-yard line missed 
a goal by only a few inches. During the half the 
features were the kicking, line plunges, and end 
runs by Glynn; the end runs of Fisk, and the 
all round good playing of Roberts. Final score: 
Varsity, 5 ; Second team, o. 



UNEUP. 

Varsity. 

Willet L. E. . 

Howbert L. T. 

Fawcett L. G. 



Second Team. 
, . Juneau- Vories 
Vandemoer 

Willis 



Bale C Vories-Tucker 

Hedblom R. G Roberts 

Vandemoer R. T Nead 

W. Lennox R. E Kaull 

L. Lennox Q Fisher 

Seybold-Fisk L. H. B Fisk-Seybold 

Giynn R. H. B Morgan 

Gibbs-Scibird F. B Scibird-Gibbs 

Referee, Allebrand; umpire, Chapman; time- 
keeper, Prof. Ahlers. 



ThB flGBR. 



BOWLING. 

Last Thursday night the College five lost three 
straight games to the Elks. The fact seems to 
be that our boys were outclassed, but before the 
season is over, at the rate the team is improv- 
ing now, we shall have a team second to none in 
this city. The Elks haven't lost a game this 
year, so it" was no disgrace to lose to them. Ber- 
nard, as usual, had the highest average on the 
team. The score : 

COLORADO COLLEGii. 



Tyler 140 

Moore 146 

West 162 

Smith 169 

Bernard 168 

785 
ElvKS. 

McClemans 156 

DeBerry 185 

Bell 213 

Wiswald 193 

Thomas 

Kane 167 







Totals 


146 


177 


463 


139 


151 


436 


173 


144 


479 


164 


193 


526 


184 


182 


534 


806 


847 


2438 
Totals 


155 


180 


491 


186 


134 


505 


192 


167 


572 
193 


144 


154 


298 


194 


221 


582 



916 871 856 2643 



ALUMNI NOTES. 

Margaret McA^ety, '01, is teaching in Iron 
Mountain, Mich. 

Winnie Fezer, '03, is helping her father in his 
drug store at Greeley. 

Mr. Gaylord, '96, is a successful newspaper 
man in Oklahoma. 

Winona Bailey, '96, is teaching German and 
Latin in the High School at Everett, Washington. 

Grace Bradshaw, '01, and Arthur E. Holt, '98, 
will be married about Christmas time. 

Miss Lucy Taylor, ex-'o3, is teaching in the 
Columbia Seminary near Nashville, Tennessee. 



Among the Alftmnae seen at the Misses Mc- 
Allister's tea Saturday afternoon were Miss Sater, 
Miss Maybelle Taylor, Miss Marybelle Taylor, 
Mrs. Francis Pastorius, Miss Silvia Brigham, 
Miss Dell Heizer, Miss Jeanette Sholz and Miss 
Lillian Johnson. 

Abner Downey, '00, is Superintendent of Schools 
in Telluride, Colo. 

A number of Alumni are expected in town for 
the game next Saturday. 



TIGER NOTES. 

Moore (German B) — I caught him in the very 
act of passing the hat — 

Prof. — Bartlett, you must have a front seat. I 
am getting too old to speak loudly and you are 
too young to hear well. 

Student in History — The people wanted a man 
for king rather than a woman. 

There is nothing fainthearted about Lamb and 
Charlie Howell. They were too late for the 
train but climbed the peak just to find out their 
blood-pressure. 

Last Thursday evening the Celestials enter- 
tained in honor of Miss Ruth Frothingham, at a 
chafing dish supper. 

Have you bought a banner? 

Miss Rudd and Miss Kidder were the guests 
of honor at a birthday spread Monday evening. 

Everybody bring a tincup to the Barbecue ! 
Present your ticket at the gate and keep it to 
give when it comes time for the eating. 

Committee. 

Colorado College has the distinction of being 
the only "college" west of Chicago that has a 
chapter of the Phi Beta Kappa society. There 
are in all ten chapters of the society west of 
Chicago. Eight of these are in state universities, 
and the other two are at Colorado College and 
the Leland Stanford University. 



Stephen N. Riggs, '99, is teaching in a Japa- 
nese High School. 



What's the matter with the P. B. T.'s? 
ing, they're all right. 



Noth- 



Miss Elizabeth Taylor, an ex-student of the 
College, is doing Y. W. C. A. work in Colorado 
and Wyoming. She is expected in the Springs 
some time in November. 



Miss Lockhart gave an informal dinner party 
before the Minerva Spread Friday night. Her 
guests were Miss Churchill, Miss Beach, Miss 
Ingersoll, Miss Cowing and Miss Stella Wilcox. 



THB TIGBR. 



Miss Clara Cowing received a visit from her 
father last week. 

Are you registered? 

Miss Hastings entertained a number of her 
friends Saturday night at a spread in honor of 

her sister. 

Who says girls can't "root?" 

The unveiling of the beautiful ( ?) painting 
presented to Miss Johnston by the Montgomery 
Art Committee took place Monday noon in the 
presence of a distinguished assemblage. 

"Best time we ever had at Ticknor" was the 
verdict of one of the Sophomore boys Saturday 
night, and the class seemed to agree with him. 
Progressive games were played and ice cream 
and wafers were served. The tally cards were 
tied with the Sophomore of Senior colors, and 
the class numerals were intertwined. 

Biol. A enjoyed a cut Monday, thanks to the 
Peak trip. 

Misses Alda and Alice Meyers were guests at 
the Phoedus Club Sunday. 

Miss Rantschler and Miss Weaver spent Satur- 
day and Sunday at their homes in Pueblo. 

Mrs. Urdahl entertained the members of Hy- 
patia at a very delightful tea Saturday afternoon. 

Mrs. Slocum entertained the girls of the Col- 
lege Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday after- 
noons. 

Freshmen, Sophomores : Do you want to make 
money? $25 in prizes in the inter-class declama- 
tion contest. "A goodly sum." 

Prof, (who has called on Mr. S. and received 
no answer) — Is Mr. S. present? 
Mr. S. (quickly) — I don't know. 

The Freshman girls in McGregor gave a spread 
Saturday evening. 

The Junior-Freshman prayer meetings are 
worth while. 

A Student in German B (reciting at the sec- 
ond call of his name — O, sir, why have you chosen 
me for a sacrifice? 



It is said that "you should not use a preposi- 
tion to end a sentence up with." 

Politics are assuming alarming proportions 
here in College. We really should hear from the 
Socialists before the eventful 8th of November. 

Have you provided yourself with a megaphone 
and a box of cough drops? If not, do it now, 
for they will be needed on Saturday. 

The members of the team and everyone in 
College certainly appreciates the work of the 
girls toward defeating Boulder on Saturday. The 
banners which are being made are sold exactly 
at cost, and the work put upon them, and by the 
way this is no small item, is entirely gratis. The 
girls are learning to yell also and may be count- 
ed on to do their share of the "rooting." We 
all join in a hearty cheer for the girls. 

German A took a cut on Thursday. 

Maybe they'll win, but we doubt it. 

"What's the matter with the Seniors?" 

Pearsons goat was busy again Friday night. 

This is a very good time, the very best time in 
fact, to do a little "boostmg" on the side. 

The grandstand will, to all intents and pur- 
poses, present a fine example of an ancient 
Quaker meeting. Of course we hope to have 
more noise, but the ushers can't stop that part 
of it. 



At a meeting of the Girls' Glee Club last 
Tuesday the following officers were elected : 
President, Miss Corinne Tuckerman. 
Vice-President, Miss Hope Smith. 
Secretary-Treasurer, Miss Clara Orr. 
Manager, Mr. Swing. 

French earned his way up the peak Monday 
by writing sentimental rhymes for the fellows to 
send to the "girls they left behind." 

The Classical Department Library has recently 
had an addition of fifty-one volumes presented 
by Mrs. M. C. Gile. These books bear chiefly 
upon Greek and Roman history. Among them 
are Bury's History of Greece, Hall's Oldest Civ- 
ilization of Greece, and Ridgeway's Early Age 
of Greece, which give the latest efforts to inter- 
pret the new historical material obtained by ex- 
cavation in the Greek lands. 



tc 



thh TIGHR 



SOCIETIES AND ASSOCIATIONS 



APOLLONIAN CLUB. 

Program, October 28 : 
Paper — "History of the Republican Party" . . 

Gibbs 

Speech — "Roosevelt the Man of Deeds" .... 

Seybold 

Declamation — "A Tribute to McKinley" .... 

McBride 

Music Apollonian Quartette 

Speech — "Reasons for Voting the Republican 

Ticket" Hansen 

Reading— "Duty First of All" Fiske 

Exteporaneous Debate — "Resolved, That the 

protective tariff is the most potent factor in 

the creation of trusts." 



MINERVA. 



"A Mirror for Kings" — 

"Shakespeare's Epic and Its Sources" .... 

Miss Churchill 

"Importance of the Historical Plays ; Pur- 
pose and Methods of the Author" 

Miss Cheley 

"The Real Arthur and the Ideal Richard 
vs. Bolingbroke" Miss Leidigh 

PEARSONS. 

Oration Musser 

Piano Solo Moore 

Colleges of the State — 

State University Morgan 

State School of Mines Lovewell 

State Agricultural College Burgess 

State Normal School Currier 

Denver University Mohler 

Boomerang Debate James 



CONTEMPORARY CLUB. 

Program, October 28 : 

"Japanese Painting" Lilyan Hastings 

"Music and Drama" Helen West 

"Education in Japan" Mildred Humphrey 



HYPATIA. 



"Economic Russia and Japan" — 

"Industry and Commerce" Dora Miller 

"Class Conditions" Louise Holcomb 

"Home Conditions" Winifred Dodson 



Y. W. C. A. 



Miss Brown spoke very interestingly on the 
subject of Foreign Missions. She showed that 
this subject was one that should be of great in- 
terest to College students. 

She explained the rise and development of 
England through the church, and mentioned the 
helpful words of the Spanish missionaries in 
America. In no other line of Christian work is 
more courage and self-sacrifice needed than in 
the office of Foreign Missionary. The time has 
passed when a person who has not succeeded in 
Christian work at home was sent to the foreign 
field. Now it is considered that one possessed 
of a good education is most fitted for the mission 
work. • 



Y. M. C. A. 



Program, October 28: 

I cou rees,yorw FoTHd$EE(shrdluaKvianu- 



Mr. Paisley spoke to the young men Sunday 
afternoon upon "The Life I Now Live in the 
Flesh." Mr. Paisley said in substance : 

The part we are now playing in the world is 
a conflict between life and death. Since God is 
on the side of life, it will ultimately win. Now, 
since life is going to eventually win, what are we 
going to do with it? It is true we are young and 
free to choose, but in our freedom we are inex- 
perienced. We need instruction, and we need a 
guide. School gives us the instruction, our 
elders the guide. Youth should also find its 
strength. In the choosing there is danger of 
our not choosing the best. We should strive to 
get the best rather than the good. Paul had a 
chance to choose between the good and the best; 
he chose the best, and we all know the result. 
Our life a cubic^ our life's aims should be high 
enough to reach the highest of our God given 
existence, broad enough to take in all our powers 
and long enough to fill the whole life. God has 
a place in life for each one of us, one that fulfills 
the requirements of the cubic life, and if we are 
willing to fill the place, be it high or low, he will 
direct us. 

Dr. Gregg will speak next Sunday upon "Tem- 
perance." 



fHH ficnk. 



it 



ACADEMY DEPARTMENT 

Earle S. Alden Editor 

F. C. Merrill Athletic Editor 



CUTLER ALUMNUS HONORED. 

Cutler has many reasons for self-congratulation, 
doubtless, but no reason more reasonable than the 
success of one of her alumni. There is nothing 
which makes the blood of a Cutler man tingle 
with such a sense of pride and of school-loyalty 
and ambition for his school, as to hear that some- 
one he knew as a Cutler fellow has made for him- 
self a worthy reputation in the years after his 
graduation. It is as if his own flesh and blood 
had been honored — almost. 

We are a young school, we have only a year 
or so ago effectually untangled ourselves from the 
bewildering yet safeguarding "apron strings" of 
our mother institution ; but there are times when 
we do feel our entity — may they come closer to- 
gether. 

The Tiger feels proud to extend the congratu- 
lations and best wishes of Cutler Academy to 
"Dick" Gregg, the newly-elected Editor-in-Chief 
of the Harvard Lampoon. 



ALUMNI GAME. 

The Alumni game Saturday morning was 
hardly what the Academy supporters had hoped 
for. While it is true that the Alumni were 
nuich heavier and had good official support, yet 
the showing was not what it should have been. 
The score, 5-0 in favor of the Alumni, is not 
a fair showing of what the Academy can do. If 
we are going to make even a good showing 
against Centennial, much hard and consistent 
practice must be forthcoming. The Academy 
rooters were rather scarce Saturday. This will 
not make our team a credit to the institution. 
The paying of the athletic fee is the least of ev- 
ery one's duties in this matter, and we should all 
be doing our best for the team that is doing its 
best for us. 



HESPERIAN. 



One of the best programs of the year was that 
rendered last Friday night. Everything moved 
along briskly, in what we are beginning to call 
"Hesperian fashion," from the start. The quo- 
tations were most of them apt and quoted in a 
way that meant something. 

Mitchell's story, which opened the program, was 
admirably written in a lively, entertaining style. 
It called forth uproarious applause from the 
house and only favorable criticism from the 



Critic. The debate on the question of the justice 
of Governor Peabody's course in deporting miners 
from Cripple Creek was characterized by enthu- 
siasm and lack of effective argument. The former 
we need, the latter we do not need. The affirma- 
tive won, though the victory was not a very glo- 
rious one. Haight's recitation was well delivered 
and very much enjoyed. Mr. Brehaut's criticism, 
which closed the program, was appreciated, and, 
we trust, will be profitably considered. 

The next program will be a political one. It is 
posted on the bulletin board. Visitors are cor- 
dially invited. 



ACADEMY NOTES. 

Roe, ex-'04, entertained several of his friends 
hy a party Tuesday. Hearts was the feature of 
the evening, in which Buchanan carried off first 
honors and was forced to take a back seat for 
five minutes. 

Dickerman is very scrupulous about attending 
Chapel now. Wonder why? 

Miss Morrison says she likes Graham (crack- 
ers). 

Tuttle is recovering from injuries received in 
the football game. 

Hoffman may be seen every day taking the hot 
air cure on the coping. 

Why didn't Moses carry out his plans Sunday 
evening? 

Mclntyre and Leslie are new Hesperians. 

Banks, C. A. ex-'o6, is at the DeWitt Clinton 
school. New York City. 



WHAT OUR EXCHANGES SAY 

The editorial columns of the Washburn Review 
for last week are devoted to the support of the 
idea of organized class contests, as opposed to 
any other form. The cane rush, which has come to 
be looked upon as an annual event, took place 
October 7th. It was under the direct supervision 
of the Junior and Senior classes, but the rules 
governing the contest were laid by the contesting 
classes themselves, so there was ample room for 
strategem and unexpected "stunts." 



ts 



fun flGBR 



The Daily Nebraskan for October 19 contains 
five new songs written for the rooters' club to 
be used at the Nebraska-Minnesota game. The 
Minnesota Daily also publishes two of the best 
songs received during the past week. Neither 
team regards Colorado's victory over the Corn- 
huskers as any indication of any weakness of 
the latter. Nebraska believes that she can just- 
ly attribute her defeat to causes other than Colo- 
rado's superior playing, and Minnesota takes 
much the same view of the case. Both teams 
look for a hard-won victory, and they realize the 
help and importance of good rooting. 



Cornell within »the last few weeks has taken 
its place in the ever growing band of institutions 
which condemn hazing. This movement was 
started a number of years ago by Princeton and 
has been taken up by most of the leading colleges 
and universities. In the future all forms of hazing 
at Cornell are forbidden under penalty of ex- 
pulsion. 



Students, if in need of glasses or repairs on 
same, see Ashby, the Optical Jeweler, the oldest 
established in the county. You will find every- 
thing right. 



Eveny Studeixt 

Buy Shoes where the Style and 
PRICES ARE RIGHT 



JUS 



ENTITLED to a Special Discount on the best Shoes made at 
lis South Tejon Street R. A. HANDY SHOE CO. 



The ©Id 
Curio Store 

Wholesale and Retail 
Dealers in 

GENUINE INDIAN GOODS AND 
CURIOSITIES 

J. S. CANDELARIO, Prop, 

301 and 303 San Francisco Street, 

SANTA FE, N. M. 



SPar/c ^a/cery 

2/47/, Vejon 

Finest Coffee and Lunch 
Room in the City 

J. SCHAEFER, Prop. Colorado Springs, Colo. 







If Voti Want 

The 'Best, 

The QuicKe4:t, 
The Most 

Satisfactory 



Line to Denver or Pueblo buy a Colo- 
rado & Southern Ticket. Get them at 
City Office, 1 5 N. Tejon. 

J. H. SPRINGER, Commercial Agent. 
Come in and ask questions. 



THE TIGER 



IS 



WHEN IN NEED OF CLOTHING, HATS 
OR rURNISHINGS 

We would suggest that' you consult your 

professor as to the best place lo go. 

We are willing to abide by their 

judgement as they all trade 

with us. We give spe- 

ial discount to students 

The B. W. DAVIS CLOTHING & FUR- 
NISHING CO., 102 N. Tejon St. 



THE CRESCENT 

BOWLING ALLEYS 

115-117 North Cascade Ave. 

Telephone Main 863 



Private Alleys for Ladies 
Eight Alleys on one Floor 
Special Rates to Parties and Clubs 



2)r. 20. Jowler, 

DENTIST 

IS South Uejon St, 



G. W. Pauly, B. S., D. O. Mrs. Lona E. Pauly, B. S. D, O. 

Graduates of A. T. Still's College of Osteopathy, 

Kirksville, Mo. 

DR. & MRS. PAULY, '^Wf^tliF 

Office, rooms 303-304 DeGraff Bldg. 118 N. Tejon St., Colo- 
rado Springs, Colo. Ph nes-Office Hed 1272; Res. Red 323 
Hours 8 to 12 a . m . , 1 to 5 p . m. 



F. H. WEEKS 

26 East Bijoti St. 

Artistic Portraits and 

all kinds of Photo- 

grapic Work 

Special Rates to Students 



next 



You are next to a good hair cut or shave when you patronize 



„The Manhattan Barber Shop, J. R. WEYMAR, Prop. 3o e. bijou 



WHITAKER & GARDNER 

30 N. TEJON ST. 

Headquarters for 

golleqe Shoes 

OF EVERY DESCRIPTION 

We have the best mining and civil engineering boot 
in the market 

WHITAKER & GARDNER 




A^NDRy 



THE STAR is the leader for prompt 
and satisfactory service. 

SPECIAL RATES to students of col- 
lege and academy 

S. E. BENNETT, College Ag't. 



SEE OIR 
WINDOW 



College Pillow Tops 

7 Views. Best Souvenir or Gift Yet 

Ashford & Roberts 

126 N. Tejon St. 

15 per cent discount to students on framing 



w. I. Lueas 



Columbia, Hartford, Rambler, Ideal & Tribune Bicycles 

The only first-class re- air shop in town. Chainless wheels 
a specialty. "Wheels for rent. Phone 517-1 1 29 N. Tejon 

Students Wishing a Special Course in Drawing, 

Water colors, Oil or China Paintings should call at 
ART STUDIO, io8 N. Tejon. MARION R. FORBISH, 

Member of Art Institute, Chicago. 



When in doubt, take the safe side. Send bundles to the 
Est.2oyrs. eolorado springs Laundry RALPHR.cE.conegeAgt. 



14 



THE TIGBR. 









' 


Colorado College 






THE OLDEST INSTITUTION FOR 






HIGHER EDUCATION IN THE WEST 




FOUNDED AT COLORADO 




SPRINGS IN 1874 






Colorado College now offers advantages of the same 






grade as the best institutions. 






For information concerning Courses of Study, Rooms 






and Board, Physical Culture, etc., apply to 






WM. F. SLOCUM, President, 






or EDWARD S. PARSONS, Dean. 






For information in regard to the College Department of 






Music, inquire of 






EDWARD S. PARSONS, Dean. 






Those wishing information as to the Courses in Drawing, 






Painting, Designing, etc., etc., inquire of 






EDWARD S. PARSONS, Dean. 






For information concerning the Engineering Depart- 






ment, apply to 






FLORIAN CAJORI, 






Dean of Engineering School. 




Cutler Academy 


Cutler Academy is the Associated Prepartory School of 




Colorado College, in which students are prepared for any 






American College. Address, 






M. C. GILE, Principal. 











THE TIGER 



15 



The Albert Sechrist Manufacturing Co. 

WILL INSTALL GAS and 



1033 16th 
Street 




ELECTRIC FIXTURES 

in your residence at Colorado Springs 
same price as Denver, without extra 
charge. Call and select yrur fixtures^ 
or will send you a catalogue. 



DENVLR, 
tOIO. 




The Williafflson=Haffner 
Engraving Company 



1633 Arapahoe Street 



DENVER 



The 50-miIe-an-hour Wheel 

Reading Standard Bicycles 



SaEFF & RIGQS: 



opposite Piaza Hotel 



^Perkins Crockeri/ Co. 

r. A. PERKINS, Manager 

120 ^. Ve/on St. 

^ Wagon Load of ^ ^ 

New Wood Type 

Atyd, Other Ma^tet*iacls 

Of the -Very Latent at 
your 'Disposal _for 

Wirvdow Coords 
Tickets, Flyers £££ 

E, J^ CRA V I JSf G — U he Kin est 

The Telegraph Job Rooms use, p. p. Ave. 

Ask wK©re TK© Tiger is Printed 



USE THE 
Colorado Midland 

in Going to 

Utah, 

California 

and the 

West 

Best Line to Colorado Po nts 

T%o trains daily Den'ver to 
Salt Lake City 




C. H. SPEERS, 

G. P. A, 



H. C. BUSH 

Traffic Mgr. 

R. T. DUNAWAY, C. P. A. 
Colorado Springs. 



JOHN MOFFAT 

Tine Cailoring 

Repairing, Cleaning, Pressing. Special rates to 

College Students 
Over Walling's Book Store 16 South Tejon St. 

VEB wirNa~ 



24 E. Kiowa St. 



Colorado Springs, Colo. 



NEW EMPIRE THEATRE 3 shows Daily n^ I Matinee 3 P. M. 

Evenings 7:30 and 8:45 



IOC 



VAUDEVILLE- 



IOC 



i6 



THE TIGER. 



El Paso Cleaning & Tailoring Co, Pressing 

IDE. Kiowa St. Phone Main 667=A Colo. Springs Cleaning 



Dyeing 
Repairing 



Altering 
Tailoring 



Prof. Chas. J, Hausdorf 

TEACHER OE MANDOLIN, GUITAR AND BANJO 

Music furnished for weddings, receptions, 

entertainments, etc. 

21 North Tejon. 



Office Phone 509-B 



Residence Phone Red 871 



DR. HARRY L. MOREHOUSE 



DENTIST 



Hours 9-12, i:30-3 



First N4tM Bank BIdg., room 8 



C. E. Arcularius & Co. 
Jewelers 

Diamonds and Watches 

Fine Jewelry Manufacturing 

9 South Tejon St. Colorado Springs 

The 

Crissey & Eowler Lumber 



Company 



Phone 101 



117 to 123 West Vermjjo Ave. 



For Prompt attention and Saiisfadory 
Work, patronize the 

Monarch Hand 
Laundry 

KARL L. MOHLER, Prop. 
W. J. WALLRICH, College Agt. 

A perfect fitting sfiirt necessitates hand %>ork 
Phone 540 329 E. Pikes Peak Ave, 

FINE CHOCOLATE BON BONS 



Name on every Piece 

Ice Cream, Hot and Cold 
Sodas 

Tresh Candies madeexery hour 



UNION ICE AND COAL COMPANY 

W. M. BANNING, Prop. 




goal, mood and Tec 

Dealers in all kinds of Coal and Artificial and 
Natural Ice 

Yard Office, 105 W.Vermijo Ave. City Office, 5 N. Tejon 



Moles and Superflous Hair removed with Electricity 
Hair Goods made to Order 

nirs^ Hnna Betbtiiaii» 

HAIR DRESSING PARLORS 

27 E. Kiowa Phone Red 394 Ladies Bath 

Colorado Springs, Colo. 



Carriages, Cabs, 

'Busses, Baggage and 

Transfer Wagons 

Office, 15 North Cascade 




Denver Law School 

Law Department of the 
University of Denver 

Three years' course leading to the degree of 
Bachelor of Laws. Courses in Mining and Irri- 
gation Law. Full resident faculty. For informa- 
tion address 

LICIIS W. HOYT, Dean 

Ernest & Cranmer BIdg., Denver, Colo. 

Did You Know 

That our stock of package crackers is so 
great in its variety that you could have a 
change for every day for more than two 
months and yet not exhaust our list? Well, 
it's a fact. We have a kind for every pos- 
sible time and occasion — and they are all 
good. Finest bakery goods in the city. 
Fancy Groceries 

W. N. BURGESS, 112 N, Tejon St. 

Titsworth & Davidson 
DAIRY 

2 MILES S. E. OE CQLORADO SPRINGS. P. 0. BOX 6 

The liouckPavidson Coal and Transfer Co. 

Dealers In 

CANON CITY, MAITLAND 

AND LIGNITE COAL 

Phone 473-B. Office 118 N. Tejon. P. O. Box 275 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 




♦ «i'«l>«i*«l>4><»<i*4'4*4'<i»4'4'4*«i>4'4>4*«l'4'4'4*4>4*4>4»4*4>4>4*4>4*«i>4'<l><i>4>4'*i>4>4*4>«i**i'4» 

* ♦ 

TJejon Si» 4, 

_^_ ♦ 

THE DERN TEA AND COFFEE CO. X 

Dealers in TEAS, COFFEES, SPICES, * 



S6^ Gowdy-Simmons Printing Company 

FOR WINDOW CARDS, TICKETS, ETC. ENGRAVED 
CARDS AND INVITATIONS ON SHORT NOTICE 



COTRELL & LEONARD, 

ALBANY, N. Y. 

Makers of CAPS and GOWNS 

to American Colleges and 

Universities 



EXTRACTS, BAKING POWDERS, Etc. 



Phone 575 



29 S. Tejon St. ^ 



The PeopIe^s Gtoczty and Matket 



PHONE MAIN 868 



222 EAST PIKE'S PEAK 



* S. JAMES & SON, Props:, 



Colorado Springs, Colorado * 



ST. JOHN & BARNES 

Oldest and largest plumbing and heating 

establishment in city. Your 

patronage solicited 



206 N. Tejon St. 



* 

4* 

41 Telephone 13 

4* 

* Phone Main 151 Established 1897 

I D. W. SMITH 

* FAMILY GROCER, TEA AND 

* COFFEE MERCHANT . : : : : 
^ Orders Called for and Promptly Delivered 

731 N. Weber St. Colorado Springs, Colo. 

LrlNC VP 

with US on the 
rVBL PROPOSITION 

We've got a whole eleven of hig^h 
grade Coals,and No Substitutes 

The Colorado Springs 

F\ICI Co. 112Pke'sPeakAv. 

TELEPHONES 230, 213 



For Goodness Sake^t^ 

Use TUDOR lower vein Coal 
It beats all other Lignite 

TIJDOR CO 41 COMPANY, Cor. Cascade and Cucharas 

c/lsk your dealer for 

VICTOR 

Athletic 
Supplies 




10 Per Cent OFF TO ALL STI DENTS ON DOUGLAS 
SHOES. DOUGLAS SHOE SfORE. 



USE ELECTRIC LIGHT 
IN YOUR HOMES 



The Colorado Springs Electric Co. 



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4»4*4»4»4*4>4>4*4>4»4*4>4*'l>4*<i''i'4*4»4>4>4>«i*«l>4*4>4*4*4*4'4*<l*4*4*4'4*4**i>4'4*4>4'4>4>4*« 

4* The Yoxiti^ Men^s Sioi-e* <!• 

♦ — — ♦ 

♦ Are You Going to Show Your Colors? ♦ 



At the Boulder College game. We have the regu- 
lar College Penant at 75c, Canes at 25c. We carry 
everything for College young men. 



SPECIAL DISCOUNT 
TO ALL STUDENTS 



HOLBROOK & PERKINS 



THE DENVER FIRE CLAY CO. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 
AND DEALERS IN 

Chemical and Physicial Apparatus and Chemicals 

A FULL LINE OF LABORATORY SUPPLIES AND ASSAY GOODS 
Write for Illustrated Catalogues 



1742-1746 Champa Street, 



DENVER, COLORADO 



Excellent Photographs 

at BINGHAM & WOOD'S. 18 S. Tejon 

H. C. COLBURN, Pres. E. A. COLBURN, Jr., Sec'y aad Treas. 

The ^yintler^ ^yjtitotnobile Co. 

LIVERY, STORAGE, ILEPAIRING 

Telephone Main 122 8-10 JV, JVe%fada A-Ve. Colorado Sprtn^^, Colo, 




O. E. HEMENWAY 



Groceries and Meats 



\\S South Tcjon St. 
Colorado Springs, Colorado 




•I"******************************************** 



4* 

•i* 
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4* 
4* 
♦ 

4* 

4- 
4* 



£H£ TIGBR 



Colora,clo College 



\ 




/ 



N0VE:MBE:R. 5rd, 1904 



VOZ.VJV-E V//. 



JSfumber 8. 



4>4i4*«i*«i»*i>4>4'«i*4*4*4>4>4*4>4*4*4>4»4*'i*4*4»4»4*4»4»4*4»4»*l**i»4>'i**i*4>4»4*4*4*4»4>4»<i» 



Special Rates to Students 

On Rented Pianos 




The KNIGHT -eflMPBELL 
Music Company 



New Lennox Block 



f^pposite North Park 



St. John Bcos.r""'''''"''''' 

Gas and Steam Fitters 

Hot Water Heating a Specialty 

Prompt attention given to Repair Work. 

gurtis <^oal Go. 

Office 132 N. Teion St. Telephone 91. 

Try "NEW RANGB" for the Kitchen, $400. 
BiruMNOUS Coal at Standaku Prices. 

SELDOMRIDGE BROTHERS, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

Flour, Feed, Grain, Hay and Seeds 

108 South Tejon Street 



Repairing while You Wait 



Satisfaction Guaranteed 



A complete plant of New Machinery for 
the Manufacture of Fine Boots and Shoes 

The Lightning Shoe Shop 

BROWN & (; O M P A N Y 
We make a specialty of Shoes to Measure and Shoes for 



Cripples. 



2314 North Tejon St. Colorado Springs 



* Visiting Card> in Latest Styles. 

% Vmi ^^ advertising in THE TiGER that we 

41 lUU... appreciate your custom. 

^^ 22 E. Kiowa St. The Pfompt Printerj 



The 



Hassell Iron Works Co. 



Founders and IMachinists 



7l/e Tl/eicome 



THE STUDENTS, 
new and old, at our studio. 

Corner Cascade and Kiowa 




TIUM j 



Dealer in Kodaks and Supplies. 




COLLEGE GOWNS, CAPS ♦ 



The Best Workmanship 
at Lowest Prices 

Silk Faculty Gowns and Hoods 

COX SONS & VINING 

262 Fourth Avenue., NEV^' YORK 



FOOT BALLS 

Pants, Nose Guards, 
Tennis Goods 
and Sweaters 



at Strangs 

119 North Tejon Street 



Mueth's 

Soda, Ice (Bream 

CATERING 

CHAS. T. FERTIG 

9^ea/ Estate, Loans and Insurance 

29 N, Tejon Street 

Uhe Colorado Springs Jfioral Co* 

FLORISTS 



704! 7/oft/i 77«/oM St»^9t 



DOVGLrAs m. he:the:rington 

^rchitect^ 

Phone 556-B Rooms 15-16 Outwest Building, Colorado Springs, Colo. 

4>4>4>*i*4>«i>4>4>4>4'*i>4i4*4*4i*l>4*4*4*<l*4*4>4*4>«i><i*4><i*4i«i»4>4'4*4'4>4**i*<l><l*<i'4*4>4><i' 



THE TIGER. 



Student's Book Store Books stationery; all Fngi- 

^^"^^ neer's Supplies; College Pins 

Centi/ry Fountain Pens $1 to $4, Waterman's $2.50 

REYER & PLATT. 



and Watch Fobs, 
and up. 



For SI 00 Oer month ' ^"'^ sponged and Pressed each week 
17 East Bijou, Branch Office opp. Plaza Hotel. 



THE COLORADO SPRINGS CO, 

The Orij^inal Locators of 

Colorado Sprint/s and TTfani'tou 

is still offering for sale choice 
lots on North Webc-r Street 
and North Wuhsatch Avenue 

Also lots for sale in other pnrts of Colorado Springs 
and in Manitou 

Apply at ROOMS, OUTWEST BUILDING 

LOUIS STeeK steam aye and aemng 

Office and Works. 115 N. Tejon St. 

TELEPHONE 517-B 

Cleaning, Dyeing, Scouring in all its branches 

Ostrich Plumes Cleaned, Dyed and Curled 

Kid Glomes Dyed and Cleaned. 

GIDDINGS BROS. 

Fine Dress Goods and Ladies' 
Tailor suits, Ladies' 

^"^ FUKNISHINGS 
Kiowa and Tejon Streets. 

ZEHNER JEWELRY CO. 

26 P. P. Ave. 

STUDENTS— Our Holiday Goods are arriving 
daily. Call and see them. 

D. E. MONROE & CO. 
Prescription Druggist 

The best of Drugs, Stationery and Toilet Articles 

NO LIQUORS SOLD. 
eor. Tejon Sf Bijou Pbone 311 S( 331 

THE HEFLEY-ARCIL4RIIS DRUG CO. 
Druddtsts 

Kodaks, Cameras and all kinds of Photographic 
Supplies. Developing and Printing for Am ituers. 
Free Delivery. 
Phone 144 21 South Tejon Street 



liardivarc Bicvclcs 

H. S, BLHKE 

New Chainless Bicy le $35 .md $20 
Rambler, Orient and N tional Automobiles 



Best Repair Shop in city 



107 n. C^ion 



lllrs* Y). R^ Crooks 

Coilct Parlors at 20 €a$t Kioiva 

Also Room 52, Antlers Hotel 

No Apprentices. Only experienced help employed. 

A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 

Largest Manufacturers in the World of Official 
Athletic Supplies 

The football snpplips manufactured by A. G SPALD- 
I G & BROS, are the best that can absolutely be produc- 
ed; tliey are of superior make; they have stood the test fo 
over twenty eight years, and are usedbv all iiitercollegiate, 
interscholastic and prominent football teams o the 
country. 

SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOTBALL GUIDE. Edited 
by Walter Camp. Contains the NEW RULES for 1904. 
Price, 10 cents. 

SPALDING'S HOW TO PLAY FOOT BALL. Edi ed by 
Walter ( amp. Newly revi-ed for 1904. Pri e 10 cents. 

"If it pertains to a hletics, we make it. " 

A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 

New York, Chicago, Deneer San Francisco, St. Louis 

Send for aco y of Spalding's Fall and Winter 

Sports Catalogue. It's Fr e. 

HENRY TAMM 

Druggist 

PRESCRIPTIONS 
TOILET ARTICLES 
STATIONERY 

All Popu'ar Drinks Served 
at our Soda Fountain 

Plaza Hotel, Cor. Cache la Poudre & Tejon Sts. 



THE RUGBY=PRIMROSE COAL CO. 

an Kinds of Fuel 

Phone 481-A West 44-A 21 N. TEJON ST. 



H.KKA/VZ 



PORGELaiX 

H. KRANZ & 



F. R. SMn H 



Only 8 Chair Barber Shop in the City 

I06y2 B. i.'ike's Peak Ave. 



BATH TUBS 

e©., Barbers 

Try the lectric Vibrassage Machine 
e©' ©RftDO SPMXGS. e©L©. 



THE TIGER. 



FITS 



CORRECTLY 



COFTaiQHTGO 

It Saves You Money and Time 

When I examine your eyes or fit your glasses. My NEW 
MEPHJD is perfection beyond a doubt. Consultation 
Free. DR. SCHADT, O, D. 

Eyesight Specialist. 
Office 303 Colorado Bldg., cor. Tejon and i i uerfano 



Use Gas 



We sell a GOOD FOUNTAIN PEN for $i 

WHITNEY & GRIMWOOD 

Opera House Bwilding 

We are agents for WATERMAN'S IDEAL FOUNTAIN 
Pens. Prices from $2. 50 up. 



^reci S. J^aj/ner 

Watchmaker and Jeweler 

15 South TJejon St, 




AND 




1739 Champa St., DENVER, COLO, 



E. W. WARSOP & CO.. 



205 N. Tejon St. 



Draperies, Upholstery Goods, Furniture. Complete line of Screens, 
Pillows, Pillow Tops, Couch Covers, etc. 



Ibz 



Denver 



ilTLewis^ $011 



Denver 



FRANK F. CRIMP 

FLORIST 

Phone 500 509 E. Columbia St. 

Special attention given to Telephone Orders. 



H. E. BOATRIGHT 

Public Stenographer 

33 GIDDINGS BLDG. 
Rates 5c per 100 words, 50c per hr. extra carbons 5c per page 



The Gox Shoe Go. 

107 S. Tejon St. Colorado Springs, Colo. 
J. M. eox 



LADIES, MISSES AND CHILD- 
REN'S SHOES 

MEN'S, YOUTHS' AND BOYS' 
SHOES 



FRANK H. SMALL watches, Diamonds, fine Watch Work. Special 
Jeweler and Silversmith P"ce to Students. 113 Pike's Peak Ave. 



Vol. VII. 



t;he TIGCR 



COLORADO COLLEGE, NOVEMBER 3, 1904. 



No. 8 




^tF^F^^^f4F4f^F^f4S0^F^f4 



ATHLETIC 
DEPARTMENT 

U. of C. 23— C. C. 



The Tigers went down to defeat last Saturday 
fighting gloriously for every inch of ground. 
But their opponents were superior and won be- 
cause they were the more powerful team, out- 
weighing the Tigers from one end of the line 
to the other and far surpassing them in fierce- 
ness of attack. Both teams played straight foot- 
ball, for neither succeeded in making any ef- 
fective fake formations. During the first half 
the Tigers had the giant defenders of the Silver 
and Gold on the jump, and for the greater part of 
the half actually outplayed them, and but for a 
costly fumble at the kickoff the conquerors of 
Nebraska would have been unable to have scored 
during the first half. But the removal of Glynn 
from the game and other regulars who were com- 
pelled to follow made it possible for the Uni- 
versity boys to gain consistently during the sec- 
ond half. 

The Rooting Club did wonderful work. Any 
club in which all the students enlist their souls 
and voices is a winner, as the rooting surely 
was. Never in practice nor in games thus far 
this year did the Tigers fight so well or so hard, 
and never during the last two years was such 
earnest and effective rooting done. It had its 
effect, and we all love old C. C. better for having 
yelled and sung for her. From the time the 
brave old Tigers trotted on the field it was one 
continual round of College songs and yells from 
the north end of the grandstand. The boys did 
their duty faithfully, but too much cannot be 
said in praise of the work the young ladies did. 
The songs were sung with as much spirit in the 
second half when the Tigers were 'compelled 
to give way before the crushing Boulder offence, 
as in the first half when Boulder was unable to 
solve our defense and were being outpunted and 



outgeneraled. The rooting showed the proper 
spirit. The Power Behind the Tigers is alright. 

For the College every man played a great game. 
Every man played all the football that he knew 
with all the proverbial Tiger spirit. Glynn was 
a tower of strength to the team on defense, mak- 
ing many sensational tackles behind the line and 
meeting every man that hurdled with the goods 
that prevented Boulder from scoring. His punts 
Vvcre long and very difficult to handle. It was 
certainly to Boulder's advantage to get him out, 
and they succeeded better than they had hoped. 
Fisher is new at quarterback, but he played a 
great defensive game, three times saving touch- 
downs by tackling big Caley. Bale deserves 
great credit for his grit. He had been sick all 
week but withstood the battering until within 
a few minutes of the close, when human grit 
could go no farther. Hedblom, Roberts and 
Howbert played wonderful defense but were 
obliged to withdraw during the second half. 
At the ends Captain Lennox and his brother 
played their positions well. Vandemoer was the 
only man in the middle of the line that withstood 
the onslaught to the last. He played aggressive- 
ly and did not have time out once. 

Captain Lennox won the toss and chose to 
defend the south goal, and at 2 .-45 Caley kicked 
to Scibird, who fumbled the put on the six- 
yard line, and a Boulder man fell on the ball. 
The Boulder team held a consultation, and Caley 
was hurled against tackle for i yard. Roberts 
tried the same place for ij^ yards. Caley was 
again tried and made firsj touchdown but not an 
inch more. The Tigers were putting up a great 
defence. The ball was now 18 inches from the 
goal line, and in two plays Caley managed to 



THE TIGBR 



put i tiipon the white line. Caley kicked a goal. 
Score, U. of C. 6, C. C. o. 

Caley kicked over the goal line. Mack touched 
the ball down and Glynn punted from the 25- 
yard line to Roberts, whom Glynn tackled on 
Boulder's 25-yard line. Johnston hit tackle for 
5 yards. Roberts tried the same place for no 
gain, but Caley made first down. The "Hold 
'em, Tigers," was coming from the sj:and, and 
the Tigers dug in and did it. Caley punted to 
Fisher on the 20-yard line. The Tigers could 
not find the right spot and Glynn punted to 
Johnston, who muffed the ball in midfield, but 
it was just as well, for it fell in Bale's arms. 
Mack hit tackle for 2 yards and Glynn plowed 
through guard for 4 more. Glynn made one 
m.ore, and Boulder was penalized 5 yards for 
offside play. Mack and Scibird could not gain, 
and Glynn dropped back for a punt, but the ball 
struck Mack, who was guarding, and ro-lled into 
the back field, where with two Boulder players 
almost on top of him Glynn punted 35 yards, 
but the ball was given to Boulder on her own 
40-yard line. Boulder by line plunges carried 
the ball against a stubborn defense to the 30- 
yard line, where the Tigers held for downs and 
took the ball. Scibird on an attempt to skirt 
end lost 2 yards, but Mack plunged througi 
guard for 8 yards. Glynn punted to Caley, who 
ran out of bounds. Glynn broke through the 
line and downed Roberts for a loss. Johnston 
made one-half yard and Caley punted to Mack, 
who was tackled in his tracks. Mack made half 
a yard, and Roberts made 2 yards. Glynn punted 
to Caley, who ran the ball back 15 yards. Caley 
made 2, Roberts 2J/2, Johnston 2, and Caley 
skirted right end for 10 yards, but Boulder was 
penalized 15 yards for holding. On the next 
play Caley, aided by great interference, skirted, 
end and Fisher alone remained between him and 
a touchdown. But little Fisher was equal to the 
occasion. He got through the interference and 
brought big Caley down in neat style. John- 
ston made 5 yards, but Hedblom tackled Coffin 
behind the line. Johnston hurdled for 12 yards, 
and Glynn downed Caley after a 12-yard buck. 
Caley made 5 and 5, Roberts made 3, and Roller 
I, placing the ball on the Tigers' 2-yard line. 
Boulder hurled her giant backs against the line 
three times, and the Tigers took the ball on 
their own i^-yard line. Glynn attempted a punt 
but the ball hit Mack, and Johnston got the ball for 
a touchdown. But Boulder was offside and was 
penalized 5 yards. Saalberg struck Glynn, who 
handed one back, and Frost sent Glynn to the 
sidelines. Howbert' made 2 yards, and Boulder 
was again penalized fcft- offside play. Morgan 
made 3 yards through tackle, and time for the 
first half was up. Score, U. of C. 6, C. C. o. 
Both teams presented the same lineup for the 



second half as was used in, the first half. Len- 
nox kicked to Roberts on the 5-yard line. Rob- 
erts ran the ball back 15 yards. By steady plung- 
ing in tJie face of stubborn defense by the Ti- 
gers Boulder carried the ball to the 2^-yard line. 
Roberts hit tackle for 2 yards, and Caley tried 
the same place for no gain. Caley was again 
hurled against the line and made exactly ^ 
yard, scoring the second touchdown. Caley missed 
an easy goal. Score, U. of C. 11, C. C. o. 

Caley kicked over the goal line and Nead 
punted from the 25-yard line. Caley ran the 
ball back 10 yards, but was stopped by Hed- 
blom's great tackle. On the next play John- 
ston fumbled, and the Tigers got the ball. Mor- 
gan could not find a hole, and Mack made but 
I yard. Nead punted from the 40-yard line, but 
Boulder was offside and received the penalty of 
5 yards. Scibird made 5 yards, but the College 
was offside and Nead punted to Johnston, who 
ran the ball back 30 yards. Nead made a fine 
tackle. Boulder again started on a steady march 
t:> the goal. The Tigers fought fiercely, making 
many splendid tackles. Boulder met a great arti- 
cle of defense inside the 5-yard line, but Roberts 
made the third touchdown. Caley kicked goal. 
U. of C. 17, C. C. o. 

Caley kicked over the line and Nead punted 
from the 25-yard line to Caley, who ran the ball 
back 20 yards. By steady line-bucking Boulder 
carried the ball to the lo-yard line, where again 
the Tigers made a great stand. But the heavy 
University backs made first down by about an 
inch, and Roberts scored the fourth touchdown. 
Caley kicked goal. Score : U. of C. 23, C. C. o. 

Caley kicked to Scibird on the 5-yard line. 
Scibird made 10 yards. Mack went through cen- 
ter for 5 yards, and Nead punted to Caley. John- 
ston hurdled for 5 yards, and Owens skirted left 
end for 15. Plunges by Caley, Roberts, and John- 
ston carried the ball to the 20-yard line, where 
Boulder found the College defense impregnable. 
Caley inissed a goal from the 20-yard line, and 
before the ball was returned time was up. 

I^INEUP. 

U. of C. C. C. 

Bruse C Bale 

Roller R. G Hedblom-Willis 

Coffin R. T Vandemoer 

Cavanaugh R. E S. Lennox (c) 

Karnapp L. G Roberts-Fawcett 

Smith L. T Howbert-Nead 

Saalberg L. E W. Lennox 

Owens (c) Q Fisher 

Caley L. H. B Scibird 

Johnston R. H. B Glynn-Morgan 

Roberts F. B Mack 

Summary — Officials, Frost and Dillon; head- 
linesmaii, Middlecamp ; timers, Fry and Strang ; 



THE TIGBR 



linesmen, Mauff and Reed; touchdowns, Caley 
2, Roberts 2; goals, Caley 3; time of halves, 30 
minutes. 

Nead, who replaced Howbert, played a great 
game. 

Johnston, the fleet halfback, in knightly fash- 
ion, had his lady's colors flying from his shin- 
guard. 

Chilly Frost was too fearful of giving "Poor 
Old Boulder" the short end and handed the 
Tigers several bunches that were very open to 
criticism. 

The Tigers fulfilled the hopes of every ad- 
mirer. We should all be proud of them. Stu- 
dents, don't let the spirit die. We can 
make the other colleges look like novices. 

Colorado College is a privately endowed in- 
stitution. We played an institution that has the 
state treasury behind it. 

Denver University will meet another defeat 
on Saturday when the Tigers line up on D. A. C. 
Park. Let's all go and see the fun. 

CROSSING THE BAR. 

Sunset and evening star, 

And one clear call for me ! 
And may there be no moaning of the bar 

When I put out. to sea. 

But such a tide as moving seems asleep. 

Too full for sound and foam, 
When that which drew from out the boundless 
deep 

Turns home again. 

Twilight and evening bell, 

And after that the dark! 
And may there be no sadness of farewell 

When I embark ; 

For though from out our bourne of Time and 
Place 
The flood may bear me far, 
I hope to see my Pilot face to face 
When I have crost the bar. 

— Alfred Tennyson. 



"CROSSING THE BAR." 
(With sincere apologies to Tennyson.) 
Darkness and midnight star, 

And some "sport" calls for me; 
And may there be no loved ones near the bar 
When I put in to spree. 

But may they all be fast asleep, 

Too sound to "stew" or "foam," 
When he would not make his mother weep 

Reels again home ! 



Eamp-post and midnight bell,. 

And after that. airs'" dark; 
In jail, I dream that I have gone to hell 

Just for a lark. 

And so from out my home, with rapid pace. 
The "Booze" has borne me far; 

I cannot look my mother in the face 
Since I have crost the bar ! 

— Wm. Merrell Vuries, '04. 

October 20, 1904. 



FOOTBALL SCORES. 

At Denver — Utah 12, Denver University o. 

At Philadelphia — Georgetown 17, Holy Cross .j. 

At Topeka — Kansas University 5, Washburn o. 

At V/est Point— West Point 16, Williams o. 

At Camp Randal] — Michigan 28, Wisconsin o. 

At Minneapolis — Minnesota 16, Nebraska 12. 

At Annapolis — Swartmore 9, Navy o. 

At Norfolk — Carlisle Indians 14, Virginia 6. 

At Mai shall Field — Chicago 6, Illinois 6. 

At Stanford University — Stanford 35, Uni- 
versity of Oregon o. 

At Golden — School of Mines 51, Aggies o. 

At Chicago — Northwestern University 45, De- 
pauw University o. 

At Bloomington, Ind.— Indiana University 8, 
Ohio State University o. 

At Des Moines — Drake University 6y, Grin- 
nell o. 

At Iowa City — Iowa University 10. Agricultu- 
ral College 6. 

At Washington, Pa.— Washington and Jeffer- 
son 35, Geneva College o. 

At .Cleeveland — Case School 16, Oberlin o. 

At Denver — West Denver High School 2, 
North Denver High School 11. 



THE SCIENTIFIC PROPOSITION. 

It may be that some persons do not know just 
what the Tigers were up against last Saturday. 
The following clipping from the Minnesota Daily 
will give them some appreciation of the situation : 

"Both Nebraska and Colorado played better 
ball than Minnesota is playing. 

"Either team would have beaten us if we had 
played them last Saturday. — Gilmore Dobie. 

"Assistant Coach Dobie, who saw the Nebras- 
ka-Colorado game at Boulder, returned yesterday. 
In speaking of the game Mr. Dobie said that an 
excellent article of football was furnished by 
both of tlie western teams. Nebraska lost the 
game on a fluke. 

"At the very outset some bad fumbling by Ne- 
braska enabled Colorado to make her touchdown, 
after that, however, Nebraska fairly outplaj'ed the 
Coloradoans, putting up a fast article of football, 
although she was not able to score." 



THE Tiger. 



THE TIGER 

Published weekly during the College year by 
The Tiger Publishing Co., in the interest of Colo- 
rado College. 

J. Y. Crothers Editor-in-Chief 

T. Hunter Assistant Editor-in-Chief 

J. I. Muffley Athletic Editor 

Miriam Carpenter Literary Editor 

Mabel Barbee Alumni Editor 

A. H. Fisher Local Editor 

Bert Wasley Business Manager 

C. A. Hedblom Assistant Business Manager 

CORRESPONDENTS: 

Mr. Nash, Miss McDowell, Miss Isham, Miss 
Kidder, Mr. Lamb, Mr. Reeks, Miss Arbuckle. 

Subscription, $1.25 per year, payable in advance. 
Single copy, 5 cents. 

The Tiger is forwarded to all subscribers until 
ordered discontinued and all arrearanges are paid. 

Students, Professors and Alumni are invited 
to contribute literary articles, personals and items. 
Contributions must be accompanied by the writer's 
name. 

Address all communications to The Tiger, 
Colorado College, Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Entered at the Postoffice at Colorado Springs, 
Colo., as second-class matter. 



Patronize Tiger Advertisers 



ALUMNI, WAKE UP ! 

\A/ITH such unusual enthusiasm pervading the 
whole student body it seems scarcely pos- 
sible that the old grads should appear so indif- 
ferent to their Alma Mater. Surely it can not 
be because they are ashamed of her. The Col- 
lege is growing better every day, and is an in- 
stitution of which any of its children may well 
be proud. We have a good football team, and 
are to have good teams all throught the year to 
represent us on the diamond, track, tennis courts 
and rostrum. The literary societies are doing 
very creditable work. Not the least item is the 
fact that our Faculty is becoming famous through 
itE publications. If you are not satisfied with 
the Tiger, just sit down a while and think how 
much you have done to make it what you think 
it should be. This slight expression of feeling is 
caused by the fact that the Alumni have not sup- 
ported their department of the TiGER very loyally 
this year. Please send communications to the 
Alumni Editor. 



WHEELS. 



P ERHAPS we can not expect the convenience 
of wheel racks at Palmer Hall until the 
students show their appreciation of those at the 
Library by leaving their wheels in them. The 
appearance of the grounds about the Library 
porch is certainly anything but inviting most of 
the time : the entrance to Palmer Hall is no 
better, but there the students are not to blame. 



EDITORIAL 



CORNELL FRATS. 



DEFEAT VS. VICTORY. 

A GAIN the Tigers have learned one of the hard 
lessons of defeat. At least we hope they 
have learned it, and had it so impressed on them 
that they will not have to learn more lessons of 
the kind for many long months. They put up 
a splendid game against big odds and deserve 
all the praise given them. The rooters are not 
yet done patting themselves on the back for their 
mignificent support of the team under such dis- 
couraging circumstances. With a continuation 
of the present spirit of determination, the rest of 
the season can scarcely be anything but an un- 
broken round of victories. The Tigers have un- 
doubtedly had their hardest game of the season, 
but they play under the disadvantage of having 
all the remaining games away from home. At 
these games they will need all the support they 
can get from loyal students and ex-students of 
the rdlege. Save up your money, and if pos«^i- 
blo accompany the team on some of its trips. 



In his annual address to the students, Presi- 
dent Schurman of Cornell sounded this note of 
v/arning to the fraternities. Although there does 
not seem to be much danger of such a spirit in 
Colorado College at present, it is better to start 
right than to have to change one's course after 
getting on the wrong track; hence we call the at- 
tention of the students to the following clipping : 

"I think that the fraternity life at Cornell is in 
many respects the most ideal arrangement for the 
lodging and feeding and social intercourse of stu- 
dents that has ever been devised in the history of 
the University. I think that small groups of stu- 
dents who live in these fraternity houses and 
meet one another as brothers give one another 
a social and perhaps a moral help which can be 
got in no other way, and I know they form life- 
kng friendships which are the source of much 
happiness and of help in the struggle for life in 
after years. Let no man therefore say — and I 
appeal to my attitude toward fraternities in the 
past to confirm me — that I am hostile to fraterni- 
ties, but I want on this occasion to express a 



THB TIGER. 



note of warning, to give vent to- a feeling of 
anxiety which has for some time disturbed me. 
I feel that our fraternities are laying stress too 
exclusively on prominence in athletics, in class 
events and in student affairs. Now I am not 
saying that all these things should not be consid- 
ered, and that fraternities should not select some 
men because they are distinguished as baseball 
players, football players, or oarsmen, or because 
they are jolly good fellows. But I do say that 
the doom of the fraternities is sealed, if they do 
not at least put on an equal footing with these 
the men who distinguish themselves in scholar- 
ship and science, which are the primary objects 
of our University. I have a suspicion, which some 
investigation in statistics tends to confirm, that 
the average standing of the fraternity men is not 
so high as the average standing of the men out- 
side. Now, gentlemen, what I want is that while 
you gain from these fraternities all the good they 
are capable of giving you, and it is a large and 
important good, you shall not overlook this other 
great consideration and belittle as 'mere grind' 
students who are distinguished as scholars or 
scientists." 



NOTICE. 



The preliminaries for the interstate debate with 
Utah will be held in Perkins Hall on the evening 
of Tuesday, November 15. All who expect to en- 
ter will hand their names and the sides they ex- 
pect to take, to Mr. Givens by Saturday, No- 
vember 5. If anyone delays longer than this, he 
will be unable to enter. 



TENNIS. 



The first round of the men's singles has been 
completed, with the following results : 

Blunt won from French. 

Currier won from Reyer. 

Alden won from Smith. 

Brehaut won from Doane. 

Nash won from Wasley. 

Moore won from Angell. 

McLain won from Merrill. 

Middlesworth won from Swing. 

Parsons, as bye, has not played as yet. One 
match of the second round has been played, Nash 
winning from Moore. 

In the ladies' singles, each player has to play 
each one of the other contestants, as there are 
but six entered. 



THE BARBECUE. 

Last Monday night Washburn Field was once 
more the scene of the annual Barbecue. This 
unique function has come to be regarded as one 



of the most important and joyous events of the 
whole College year. According to the esfab- 
lished customs, the Sophomores managed the af- 
fair, and they deserve praise and credit for the 
splndid way in which the plans were carried out. 
Every detail from the serving to the decorations 
had been attended to. The elimination of the 
small boy nuisance was nearer complete than at 
any previous Barbecue. The crowd was handled 
easily and quickly, and all were served equally. 
The evolution of the method of distribution has 
experienced marked changes in the last two 
years. At the Barbecue a year ago, the man- 
agers did away with the tray methods of serving, 
and that put an end to much of the disorder and 
confusion, and the only objection to the system 
being its slowness. This year, however, this 
drawback was eliminated by the introduction of 
a searving booth at each end of the stand. The 
program was undoubtedly the best of many good 
Barbecue programs. Mr. Scibird, President of 
the Sophomore class, gave the address of wel- 
come. He also took occasion to remind us of the 
v/onderful achievements of the Class of '07. If 
anyone was left with any doubts of the, true 
greatness of this class, it must have been due to 
some unjust prejudice. President Slocum's ad- 
dress began with an eulogy to the Faculty, espe- 
cially along athletic lines. During the course 
of his remarks he expressed his willingness to 
match his "stars" against anything in College in 
any sort of a contest from a football game down 
to a relay race. Passing from dilating on the 
Faculty, President Slocum spoke briefly of the 
superiorities of Colorado College. Prof. Ahler's 
Harvard, Dr. Shedd's Princeton, Dr. Cajori'j 
Wisconsin and Prof. Noye's Yale may surpass 
Colorado College in a few minor details, but 
these insignificant institutions sink into obscur- 
ity, when we remember that Colorado College is 
the only really great institution, since it is the 
only one that has a Barbecue. Prof. Ahlers 
gave an appreciation of the brave fight of the 
Tigers last Saturday before he got down to 
the serious part of his speech. The whole audi- 
ence was taken into the Professor's confidence, 
and he read a part of his last week's correspond- 
ence. Letters from Dr. Lancaster, Prof. Patti- 
son and Dr. Parsons were listened to with in- 
terest. Dr. Urdahl's epistle contained an argu- 
ment against the constitutionality of the forcible 
deportation of Mr. Glynn from the game last 
Saturday. Prof. Noyes' poetical description of 
Atherton, Jr., was the hit of the evening. Mr. 
Ahlers closed with the reading of a strictly pri- 
vate, confidential letter from Dr. Cajori, which 
revealed to the wondering audience the secret of 
the manufacture of faculty jokes. Prof. Ahlers 
turned state's evidence and laid bare a deep laid 
plot, in which Dr. Cajori and the aforenamed 



8 



THE flGHR 



Professor were the guilty accomplices. It seems 
that these two worthies formed a partnership for 
the mutual springing of jokes and roasts. Prof. 
Ahlers closed with the assurance that he had 
another pocketful of jokes, but that they belonged 
by right of the mutual partnership to Dr. Cajori, 
who would make use of them later in the even- 
ing. "Convergent ^nd Divergent" could be the 
title of no one's speech, unless it was Dr. Ca- 
jcri's. He handled the subject with the skill 
and precision of a mathemetician. Among other 
things he said that he hoped that the next gen- 
eration of Sophomores would still continue ^o 
give Barbecues, and that the length of the 
speeches, with the exception of President Slo- 
cum's would be a decreasing variable. He also 
expressed the desire that the curves described by 
the dancing figures of the spectators would be a 
positive upward curve symbolic of their aims 
and ambitions in life. Mr. Hansen, who was to 
speak of the glories of the Class of '08, seemed 
to be afraid that he would abuse his privilege, so 
he refrained from anything more than a mere 
mention of the august assemblage that he repre- 
sented. His time was taken up with the cracking 
01 jokes new and old. However, we must give 
Mr. Hanson the credit of being stocked with 
more new than old ones. Of course now and 
then it was necessary to introduce an old one to 
give the audience time to recover from the con- 
vulsions awakened by the new ones. Mr. Givens 
spoke forcibly of the achievements of the Class 
of '06. He did not confine his roasts to rival 
classes, but with a careless disregard of awak- 
ening the wrath of the gods, he handed out 
packages to the Faculty also. Mr. Hall then 
gave a retrospect of the Class of '05, in which 
he reviewed in glowing terms the accomplish- 
ments of that body. He closed with a funny 
story, but the introduction of profanity into the 
sr.me renders it unfit for publication. Both Mr. 
Givens and Mr. Hall seemed to understand that 
the secret of success in awakening applause lies 
ii' the shortness of one's speech. Mrs. Mary 
Talbot Jones then enlivened the audience with 
a well rendered selection, entitled "The Goblins." 
The string quartette, composed of the Misses 
Johnson and Mr. Kier, broke the monotony and 
nervous strain occasioned by the speeches with 
a number of good musical pieces. The vocal 
quartette was encored three times, which fact is 
the best testimony of the appreciation of their 
work. While the audience were "feeding their 
faces" around the fire on a sumptuous banquet 
of roast beef, pickles, apples, peanuts and cider, 
the football men entertained them with a blan- 
ket tossing performance in about a dozen acts. 
Messrs. Doane, Whitehurst, Bennett, Heustis, 
Roberts, Himebaugh, Pollin and some unknown 
young lady (?) were in the cast of characters. 



President Sill of the Freshman Class was also 
billed for an appearance, but he was unavoid- 
ably detained studying mathematics. James, 
who was put in to complete the troupe, demon- 
strated the benefits derived from being able to 
turn circles around anyone else. The character- 
istic poses assumed by Prof. Himebaugh in his 
aerial flights appealed to the ascetic and artistic 
nature of all present. Mitchell was the chosen 
representative of the Academy, but the bold 
front with which he met his tormetors made them 
quake with fear and seek safety in flight. Ev- 
erywhere the blanket performance awakened fa- 
vorable comment, and all agree that the commit- 
tee selected its artists with the skill of a master 
Soon after the last Freshman had made his un- 
successful attempt to become transformed into a 
cloud the people began to think of the morrow's 
lessons, and with the exception of a few "night 
owls," who remained around the blazing bonfire, 
the field was once more deserted. 



THE ETHICAL ADDRESS. 

East Monday morning President Slocum gave 
a very encouraging talk on the "Victory of De- 
feat." He said in part : 

Such a defeat as the Tigers experienced last 
Saturday was no disgrace. Even though Boul- 
der was victorious, the Tigers won a splendid 
m.oral victory. Such a brave fight against ad- 
versity and in the face of certain defeat must 
inevitably portend ultimate success. It is that 
sort of a spirit that is bound to win out in the 
long run. Continued failure is impossible. It 



THE' FdOTBAEE 

The following from the Sunday Gazette and 
Telegraph speaks for itself: 

Outweighed from one end of the line to the 
other, weakened by the loss of her best players, 
Colorado College fought and struggled to the 
last minute with grim desperation against over- 
whelming odds. And through it all was the 
football girl who followed every play with a 
feeling of hope when the Tigers gained ; a 
Icok of apprehension when Boulder swept 
through the line. She was the first to cheer 
when the Tigers came tumbling onto the field; 
and her voice, a trifle husky from long cheer- 
ing and singing, and with a little catch in it, was 
heard, still defiant, across the field as the Tigers 
were making their last stand. She was proud 
of the team, even though beaten, and she waved 
her College colors just as bravely after the strug- / 
gle as before. It was a great day for the footabll 
girl. There were hundreds of her in the stands. 
She came in crowds and colors, clad in silk and 
velvet, shirt waist and sweater. 



THB TIGBR. 



is that kind of spirit that makes successful men 
and women. To keep up a good fight after vic- 
tory is easy, but even after our defeat last Sat- 
urday we are going to keep on striving for suc- 
cess. Because we lose the game is all the more 
reason why we must win the next. Because we 
lose the championship this year, we are not go- 
ing to give up. 



BOWLING. 



Last Thursday was an off night for most of 
the College bowlers, and in consequence they 
lost two out of three games to the Business Men. 
Glynn and James bowled for the first time with 
the College team. The former showed up re- 
markably well. Bernard's score of 232 was by 
far the best of the series. The score: 

BUSINESS MEN. 

Hayden 185 192 146 523 

McCuan 163 202 175 540 

Waterton 154 171 204 529 

Davis 129 169 205 503 

Nydegger 147 151 I47 445 

778 885' 877 2540 

COLORADO COIvEEGE. 

Tyler 156 170 172 498 

Glynn 198 147 164 509 

Moore 167 136 154 457 

Smith 138 162 163 463 

Bernard 232 232 

James 149 129 278 

891 764 782 2437 



ALUMNI NOTES. 

Nothing helps the College so much as an oc- 
casional visit from its Alumni. After one has 
taken his degree he is apt to consider himself 
free from all obligations to the institution, and 
as time goes on the place that gave birth to his 
noblest ambitions drops into oblivion. It should 
not be so, but nevertheless it is a painful fact 
in many cases. "My friends are gone, what is 
there to go back for?" say some. True enough, 
but was there nothing else in College besides 
your friendships to make it worth while? The 
new students are always glad to see and know 
the graduates and ex-students. We feel that 
there is a common bond that should bring us 
closer together and unite us in an effort to push 
our Alma Mater to the front. Would that we had 
more Cooleys and Frosts ! It was invigorating to 
watch them at the game last Saturday. Many 
Alumni were in evidence along the side-lines. 
McClintock, Van Nostran and Reed were down 
from D. U. to cheer for the Tigers. In the 



grandstand were seen Armstrong, '98, Mitchell, 
ex-'o6, Lucile Alderdice, '04, Katriena Hayden, 
"04, Howell, '04, Ella Graber, '02, Vories, '04, 
Hunt, '04, Jeanette Scholz, '03, Francis Douthit, 
ex-'o7, and Katherine Weaver, ex-'o7, Cora 
Wilcox, '04, and Lillian Johnson, '01. 



TIGER NOTES, 



Among former students down for the game 
were Misses Shuler, Piatt, Persinger, Packard 
and Frees. They showed their loyalty by cheer- 
ing for C. C. 

Many trips are being planned for election day, 
among them a trip to the Half Way House, a 
burro party to Crystal Park and trips to the 
canons. 

The girls sent a magnificent bunch of chrys- 
anthemums to the team to show their appreciation 
of its good work. 

Miss Maud Smith will entertain the members 
of Hypatia Friday night. 

The tennis tournament of the girls will begin 
this week. 

Miss Bessie Gordon is a new resident of Mont- 
gomery. 

The Apollonian goat gets busy this Friday 
night. 

Mr. J. W. McCreery was at the College last 
Thursday. 

Does P. B. T. have any meaning? 

Prof. Strieby gave Chemistry B a cut Sat- 
urday. 

Two Boulder girls visited Miss Mary Mc- 
Creery Saturday. 

Ticknor girls had a football game Saturdav 
evening. It is a dangerous game in close quar- 
ters. 

Miss Hazel Wagner gave a fudge party to a 
few Freshman girls. 

Prof. Noyes — If you do not find me in room 
22, look on the bulletin board. 

Hedblom insisted that time be taken out Sat- 
urday night. If fact he took out time until 
Sunday morning. 



tc 



ThB fiGBR. 



Our esteemed athletic editor became so ex- 
cited at the Chapel meeting Friday that he 
carried home a hymn book instead of his Iliad. 
We hope that in the future he will be more care- 
ful to observe the rule about removing hymn 
books from the room. 

Do not come late to History. The door may be 
locked. 

All aboard for Denver. 



How is the weather up there? 

A number of the students intend to go home 
to vote. 

Thank you, thank you. 

We had our little celebration in spite of . 

Dr. S. (getting on car in Colorado City just as 
Mr. Brigham was getting off) — Well, Mr. Brig- 
ham, what are you getting off here for? 

Brigham — What are you getting on here for? 



^^^'4^4^^^^^^^^«i< 



SOCIETIES AND ASSOCIATIONS 



PEARSONS LITERARY SOCIETY. 

Program, November 4 : 
Debate on the Interstate Question — "Resolved, 

That the closed shop system is beneficial to 

American industry." 

Affirmative Givens-Strock 

Negative M. Hall-Birchby 

Closed meeting. 



CONTEMPORARY CLUB. 

On November 4 Mrs. Cajori will speak to the 
society on "Arts and Crafts of Japan." 



HYPATIA. 

Debate — "Resolved, That the civilization of 
Japan is of a higher type than that of 
Russia." 

. Marie Roberts, Vera Rodger 
Ruth Anderson, Edna Taylor 



Affirmative 
Negative . . 



Y. W. C. A. 



The last meeting was one of the most enjoy- 
able of the year. Miss Whitby and Miss Wright, 
missionaries among the Zulus of South Africa, 
talked most interestingly of their work. 

Miss Whitby spoke first on the religious and 
educational work in which she has been engaged. 
She told of the church night school and chorus 
class, which were well attended by the men. 

The Zulus are keen, warlike and, intelligent, 
possessing the intense superstitious beliefs so 
prevalent among half savage tribes. 

Miss Wright then spoke of her work among 
the girls and women. A woman is entirely un- 
der the control of her husband, or if unmarried 



of her father and brother. She is sold in mar- 
riage for a certain number of cattle, and is not 
consulted in the least as to her wishes in any 
matter. A woman wishing to became a Chris- 
tian is liable to persecution, for the men fear 
she will adopt European customs as well. Miss 
Wright finished her talk by singing "Nearer, My 
God to Thee" in the Zulu language. 



Y. M. C. A. 



Last Sunday afternoon we had the pleasure 
of listening to Rev. J. B. Gregg, pastor of the 
First Congregational church. Mr. Gregg said in 
substance : 

The essence of religion is not formality, but it 
is personal relationship, a friendship with Jesus 
Christ. Then the Christian's hope is the great- 
est thing in the world. Christianity is broad 
enough to take in all trades and professions, and 
it is only by the Christian life we can make the 
most out of ourselves and develop our individu- 
alities. A seeming insignificant thing done for 
God may have a lasting impression upon our 
lives and upon the world. Although we can 
serve God in any trade or profession ; the place 
where we can get the greatest satisfaction to 
ourselves and do the greatest amount of good to 
God and humanity is in the Christian ministry. 

The Student Volunteers will have charge . of 
next Sunday's meeting. 



Junior — Why did you call that fellow who just 
went by "The Automobile?" 

Wise Senior — Because he never uses a "pony" 
unless he gets stuck. 

Deacon — That was a great sermon you 
preached. It was well timed, too. 

Pastor — Yes, I noticed the congregation looked 
ai- their watches quite frequently. 



THE fiGBk. 



a 



ACADEMY DEPARTMENT 

Harle S. Alden Editor 

P . C. Merrill Athletic Editor 



CONVERSATIONS WITH ANN. 

No. I. 
"I am tired of your 'Ann-ecdotes,' Ann," said 
I. You talk too much." 

"The trouble with you," replied Ann vigorously, 
I have not known Ann to be so ruffled for months, 
"The trouble with you is that you don't talk 
enough. You think too much ! am like Shake- 
speare in one thing, I like sleek-headed men who 
sleep o' night.' Speech is the natural outlet, the 
safety valve of thought, as it were. I have al- 
was told you that action needs to be explained. 
You go right ahead and do things and expect 
people to follow your own line of argument, in- 
• stinctively, and to arrive at the same conclusions. 
You may make enemies by keeping still. There 
are certain things that are expected of you. Some 
one must protest; a minority report is valuable 
in its place ." 

'Xet me sleep, Ann," I groaned. "You know 
the baby cried all night last night and I ." 

"I believe in the best man for the place (In- 
terruptions* seem but to fan the flame of Ann's 
zeal.) and this applies to football as well as 
elections, it applies to bodies of men, it applies 
to rulers, to kings ." 

"You are too Democratic," said I. "Surely 
you have some respect for the divine right ot 
kings." 

"I believe " 

"In the Holy Ghost, in the Holy Catholic 
Church," I murmured. 

"Speaking of athletics," said Ann, coming down 
tc earth, "it is the last place in the world for 
politics. Why should a man play football better 
because he can drink more beer, or a girl sing 
more sweetly because she has red hair. In plain 
w^ords (Ann is full of frills.) I stand for equal- 
ity and I object to favoritism even in a boarding 
house." 

"Oh, well ! we agree perfectly there," said I. 
"I mean about athletics. I surely stand for 
the same spirit that you stand for and believe 
ii. the old-fashioned 'reward of merit' system. 
I hope everyone knows that." ' 

"They won't know unless you tell them. What 
you do is what counts. Why don't you see to it 
that your theory is carried out. Insist that the 
common interests be placed first !" 

"Oh, I'm not much of a 'scrapper' but I'll 
do my best, when there is need of it," I said, 
and I will. 



Instructor (in Latin I) — A masculine cannot 
go with a feminine — i. e., in Latin — it may not 
be so in other languages. 



WHAT OUR EXCHANGES SAY 

The Echo, published at Olivet College, in speak- 
ing of its new President, Dr. Lancaster, says : 
"Acquaintance with Olivet's new President ef- 
fectively dispels all doubts as to her inevitable 
prosperity. With so vigorous and powerful a 
leader, so progressive and inspiring an instructor. 
Olivet promises much for the future." 

Washburn College now rejoices in the assur- 
ance of a new Carnegie Library. The corner- 
stone was laid with appropriate ceremony on 
October 13, and the construction of the buildmg 
itself will be carried forward as rapidly as pos- 
sible. The estimated cost will be $40,000, the gift 
of Mr. Carnegie. 



President Harper of . Chicago, speaking ^on 
higher education in tne West, has brought for- 
ward many interesting and vital questions. He 
asks, among other things, if the Western college 
i^. not more modern than the Eastern; if the fra- 
ternal relationship between student and instructor 
i.': not closer in the West than in the East; if the 
Western idea of co-education does not show a 
m.ore democratic spirit than the Eastern; and 
lastly, if the student of a Western college is not 
far more serious and practical than his brother 
in the East. 

Young Lady (looking at picture of the Acrpolis 
at Athens) — Is that in Greece? 
Senior — Oh, no ! That's in oils. 

He — Will you have a lobster? 

She — Oh, John ! this is so sudden ! — Ex. 

Mary had a little piece of gum ; 

That gum was white as snow. 
And everywhere that Mary went. 

That gum was sure to go. 
It went with her to school one day, 

Which was against the rule. 
The teacher took that gum away, 

And chewed it after school. 

"I think," said the actor, when a cabbage just 
grazed his nose, "that some one in this audi- 
ence has lost his head." — D. U. Clarion. 



The TiGUk 



EXCHANGES 



If a man were so constituted that he could 
pat himself on the back gracefully, or kick him- 
self effectively, he would spend most of his spare 
time in doing one or the other. 



'Evolution," said the monkey, 

"Makes all mankind our kin ; 
There's no chance at all about it- 
Tails we lose — heads we win." 



CHARLES P. BENNETT 

Real Estate, Lrans 
and Insurance^ ^ 

NO. 5 PIKE'S PEAK AVENUE 



Students, if in need of glasses or repairs on 
same, see Ashby, the Optical Jeweler, the oldest 
established in the county. You will find every- 
thing right. 



Bookkeeping 
Shorthand 
Typewriting 



CENTRAL 



i5»- 



usiness 



Colteye 



College Estab- 
lished in 
Denver in (887 



L A. ARNOLD, Pres. J. C. CROY, Prin. 

Nichols Block, 18 and 20 S. Tejon St., 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 



Rooms inviting, Work Thorough, Teachers up-to-date 



Call or Write for information. 



THE COLOnADO ROAOT 




^^''""?^00*SDUl«t***'^ 



If you Want 

The "Be^t, 

The Quicks-sf,. 
The Most 

Satis f cLcfory 



Line to Denver or Pueblo buy a Colo- 
rado & Southern Ticket. Get them at 
City Office, 1 5 N. Tejon. . 

J. H. SPRINGER, Commercial Agent. 
Come in and asl< questions. 



THB TIGER 



IS 



WHE^ IN NEED OF CLOTHING, HATS 
OR FURNISHINGS 

We would suggest that you consult your 

professor as to the best place lo go. 

We are willing to abide by their 

judgement as they all trade 

with us. We give spe- 

ial discount to students 

TheB. W. DAVIS ClOTHING & FUR- 
NISHING CO., 102 N. Tejon St. 



THE CRESCENT 

BOWLING ALLEYS 

115-117 North Cascade Ave. 

Telephone Main 863 



Private Alleys for Ladies 
Eight Alleys on one Floor 
Special Rates to Parties and Clubs 



2>r. 20. bowler, 

DENTIST 



IS South TJejon i5V. 



G. W. Pauly, B. S., D. O. Mrs. Lona E. Pauly, B. S. D. 0. 

Graduates of A. T. Still's College of Osteopathy, 

Kirksville, Mo. 

DR. & MRS. PAULY, ?g'vl?c^i\Ts"= 

Office, rooms 303-30t DeGraff Bldg. 118 N. Tejon St., Colo- 
rado Sprinj-'S, Colo. Ph nes-Office i\edl272; Res. Ked323 
Hours 8 to 12 a . m . , 1 to 5 p . m. 



F. H. WEEKS 

26 East Bi|oti St. 

Artistic Portraits and 

all kinds of Photo- 

grapic Work 

Special Rates to Students 



ne^f 



You are next to a good hair cut or shave when you patronize 



The Manhattan Barber Shop, J. R. WEYMAR, Prop. 3o e. bijou 



WHITAKER & GARDNER 


Ai^=^TAUNDRv 


30 N. TEJON ST. 

Headqaatter s for 


^^^^A^lS^^==^^ 


(?oileqe Shoes 

OF EVERY DESCRIPTION 

We have the best mining and civil engineering boot 
in the m rket 

WHITAKER & GARDNER 


THE STAR is the leader for prompt 
and satisfactory service. 

SPECIAL RATES to students of col- 
lege and academy 

S. E. BENNETT, College Ag't. 


"Bhe Best Yet 

COLLEGE PILLOW TOPS shows ever, 
important College Building. Souvenir of 
College Days. 

Ashford & Roberts^ .'26 n. 

Tejon St. 

15 per cent discount to students on framing 


W. I. LUeHS 

Columbia, Hartford, Rambler, Ideal & Tribune Bicycles 

The oi'ly first-class re air shop in town. Chainles's wheels 
a specialty. Wheels for rent. Phone 517- \. 1 29 N. Tejon 


Broken hearts Can be Mended (Rivited or Ce= 

niented) By taking them to the hospital for repair- 
ing Cut Glass and China. MARIE R. FORBISH, Art 
Studio, 108 N. Tejon. 



Est. 20 yrs. 



When in doubt, take the safe side. Send bundles to the 

Colorado Springs Laundry RALPHRicE.conegeAgt. 



14 



THE TIGER. 



Colorado College 



THE OLDEST INSTITUTION FOR 
HIGHER EDUCATION IN THE WEST 

FOUNDED AT COLORADO 
SPRINGS IN J874 



Colorado College now offers advantages of the same 
grade as the best institutions. 

For informa^tion concerning Courses of Study, Rooms 
and Board, Physical Culture, etc., apply to 

WM. F. SLOCUM, President, 
or EDWARD S. PARSONS, Dean. 

For information in regard to the College Department of 
Music, inquire of 

EDWARD S. PARSONS, Dean. 

Those wishing information as to the Courses in Drawing, 
Painting, Designing, etc., etc., inquire of 

EDWARD S. PARSONS, Dean. 

For information concerning the Engineering De'part- 
ment, apply to 

FLORIAN CAJORI, 
Dean of Engineering School. 



Cutler Academy 



Cutler Academy is the Associated Prepartory School of 
Colorado College, in which students are prepared for any 
American College. Address, 

M. C. GILE, Principal. 



THE TIGER. 



15 



The Albert Sechrist Manufacturing Co. 

WILL INSTALL GAS and 



1033 16th 
Street 




ELECTRIC FIXTURES 

in your residence at Colorado Springs 
same price as Denver, without extra 
charge. Call and select yrur fixtures^ 
or will send you a catalogue. 



DENVLR, 
tOIO. 




The Williafflson=Haffner 
Engraving Company 



1633 Arapahoe Street 



DENVER 



The 50-mile-an-hour Wheel 

Reading Standard Bicycles 



SflEFF & RIGGS: 



Opposite Plaza Hotel 



S^er/cins Crockeri/ Co. 

F. A, PERKINS, Manager 

120 97. Vejon St 

^ XOagort Load of ^ ^ 

Ne^w Wood Type 

O/" the -Very Latent at 
your 'Disposal _for 

Wirvdow Ca^rds 
Tickets, Flyers etc 

B JV G 7ij\ V I jsr C — U he Finest 

The Telegraph Job Rooms use, p. p. Ave. 

Ask wKere TKe Tiger is Printed 



USE THE 
Colorado Midland 

in Going to 

Utah, 

California 

and the 

West 

Best Line to Colorado Po nts 

T^o trains daily Denver to 
Salt Lake City 

H. C BUSH C. H. SPEERS, 

Traffic Mgr. G. P. A. 

R. T DUNAWAY, C. P. A. 
Colorado Springs. 




The Old 

Surio Store 

Wholesale and Retail 
Dealers in 

GENUINE INDIAN GOODS AND 
CURIOSITIES 

J. S. CANDELARIO, Prop., 

301 and 303 San Francisco Street, 

SANTA FE, N. M. 



NEW EMPIRE THEATRE 3 shows Daily m^ I Matinee 3 P. M. 

_ IOC evenings 7:30 and 8:45 



IOC 



VAUDEVILLE- 



i6 



THE TIGER 



El Paso Cleaning & Tailoring Co. 

1(1 E. Kiowa St. Phone Main 667=A Colo. Springs 



Pressing Dyeing Alte ing 

Cleaning Repairing Tail: ring 



Prof. Chas. J. Hausdorf 

TEACHER OF MANDOLIN, ullTAR AND BANJO 

Music furnished for weddings, receptions, 

entertainments, etc. 

21 North Tejon. 



Office Phone 509-B 



Residence Phone Red 871 



DR. Um L. MOREHOUSE 



DENTIST 



Hours 9-12, 1:30-5 



First N t'l Bank BIdg., room 8 



C. F. Arcularius & Co. 
jewelers 

Diamonds and Watches 

Fine Jewelry Manufacturing 

9 South Tejon St. Colorado Springs 

The 

Crissey & Fowler Lumber 
Company 

Phone 101 117 to 123 West Vermijo Ave. 

For Prompt attention and Satisfactory 
Work, patroniz the 

Monarch Hand 
Laundry 

KARL L. IVIOHLER, Prop. 
W. J. WALLRICH, College Agt. 

A perfect fUttng shirt necessitates hand %>ork 
Phone 540 329 E. Pikes Peak Ave. 

FINE CHOCOLATE BON BONS 



Name on every Piece 

Ice Cream, Hot and Cold 

Sodas 

Tresh Candies madeexery hour 



UNION ICE AND COAL COMPANY 

W. M. BANNING, Prop. 




goal» mood and Tec 

Dealers in all kinds of Coal and Artificial and 
Natural Ice 

YaidOffice, 105 W. Vermijo Ave. City Office, 5 N. Tejon 




JOHIN MOFFAT 

Tine Cailoring 

Repairing, Cleaning;, Pressing. Special rates to 
College Students 

Over Waiting's Book Store 16 South Tejon St. 



Carriages, Cabs, 

'Busses, Baggage and 

Transfer Wagons 

©ffice, 15 IVorth Cascade 



Denver Law School 

Law Department of the 
University of Denver 

Three years' course leading to the degree of 
Bachelor of Laws. Courses in Mining and Irri- 
gation Law. Full resident faculty. For informa- 
tion address 

LUCIUS W. HOYT, Dean 

Ernest & Cranmer BIdg., Denver, Colo. 

Did You Know 

That our stock of package crackers is so 
great in its variety that you could have a 
change for every day for more than two 
months and yet not exhaust our list? Well, 
it's a fact. We have a kind for every pos- 
sible time and occasion — and they are all 
good. Finest bakery goods in the city. 
Fancy Groceries 

W. N. BURGESS, 112 N. Tejon St. 

Titsworth & Davidson 
DAIRY 

2 MILES S. E. OF COLORADO SPRINGS. P. 0. BOX 6 

The Houck-Davidson Coal and Transfer Co. 

Dealers In 

CANON CITY, MAITLAND 

AND LIGNITE COAL 

Phone 473-B. Office US N. Tejon. P. O. Box 275 
Colorado Springs, Colo, 




4*«l*«i»«i**i'*i»4><i*4»4' 4* •!• ^****** 



'She Gowdy-Sinnmons Printing Company 

FOR WINDOW CARDS, TICKETS, ETC. ENGRAVED 
CARDS AND INVITATIONS ON SHORT NOTICE 



4>4>4'<l'*i>4>4"i*<i>*i*«i*4*4>4><i>4>4>-i' 

4» 

4* 

4* 
4* 
4* 



2/ Tforih 
TJejon St, 



COTRELL & LEONARD, 

ALBANY, N. Y. 

Makers of CAPS and GOWNS 

to American Colleges and 

Universities 



THE DERN TEA AND COFFEE CO. 

Dealers in TEAS, COFFEES, SPICES, 
EXTRACTS, BAKING POWDERS, Etc. 



Phone 575 



29 S. Tejon St. ^ 



4* 
4* 
* 
4* 
4» 
♦ 
4* 
4* 
4« 
4» 

4» 
4» 



The People's Grocery and Market 



PHONE MAIN 868 

S. JAMES & SON, Props, 



4* 

4* 

4» 
4- 
4- 

222 EAST PIKE'S PEAK ♦ 

4> 



Colorado Springs, Colorado * 

4« 

4' 



ST. JOHN & BARNES 

Oldest and largest plumbing and heating 

establishment in city. Your 

patronage solicited 



Telephone 13 



206 N. Tejon St. 



Phone Main 151 



Established 1897 



D. W. SMIIH 

FAMILY GROCER, TEA AND 
COFFEE MERCHANT . : : : : 
Orders Called for and Promptly Delivered 

731 N. Weber St. Colorado Springs, Colo. 

THe Scrubs 

Don't score on us when 
it comes to selling Coal 

R i g K t 

The Colorado Springs 

F\iel Co. 112Pke'sPcakAv. 

TELEPHONES 230, 213 



For Goodness Sake<^^ 

Use TUDOR lower vein Coal \ 
It beats all other Lignite * 

4» 

TUDOR CO a COVIPANY, Cor. Cascade and Cucharas 4* 

. 4- 

cAsk your dealer for * 

VICTOR 

Athletic 
Supplies 





10 Per Cent OFF TO ALL STUDENIS ON DOUGLAS 
SHOES. DOUGLAS SHOE SrORE. 



USE ELECTRIC LIGHT 
IN YOUR HOMES 



The Colorado Springs Electric Co. 



4*4*4»4»4*4>«i»4>4*4»4>^*l»4>4*4**l*4*<i»4»4»4*4>4*«i>4*4*«l»«4*4»4»4>4*4»4*4*4*4>4>4*4*4»<i*4'<i> 



4**i>4*4*4*4»4>4*'i*4*'i'4»4*4>4'4>*i»4»4*4*4>4*4*4*4»4>4>'i'«i>4**i>4'*i'«i*«i*4**i>4'4*4*4*4> 

The Yoxin^ Metx^& Store* 

FOR. the: YOVNG LrADICS 

0/J^ ARE showing a larg-e variety of beautiful 
^^ Fans, Plain, White, Blue, Red, Brown, Grey 
and Mixed Patterns. Our prices are 50c, 75c and 
$1.00. If you want a beauty you'll find just what 
you are looking for. 



4.4.4. 



SPECIAL DISCOUNT 
TO ALL STUDENTS 



HOLBROOK & PERKINS 



THE DENVER FIRE CLAY CO. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 
AND DEALERS IN 

Chemical and Physicial Apparatus and Chemicals X 



A FULL LINE OF LABORATORY SUPPLIES AND ASSAY GOODS 
Write for Illustrated Catalogues 



* (742-1746 Champa Street, 



DENVER, COLORADO * 



.^C'O Photographs 



at BINGHHM & WCOD'S. 18 S. Tejon * 



H. C. COLBURN, Pres. E. A. COLBURN, Jr., Sec'y and Treas. ♦ 

The ^yJixtler'S ^yititom chile Co. * 

LIVER. Y, STORAGE. REPAIRING * 

Telephone Main 122 8-10 /f, /fetiada A-Oe. Colorado Springs. Colo, a 




O. E. HEMENWAY 



Groceries and Meats 



\\S South Tejon St. 
Colorado Springs, Colorado 







•l»«i'4'4'4»4'**«l»4» ♦* 4. •!• 4* ♦ •!• 4* 



* 

4> 
4. 4. 41 4. 4. 



!«£ TIGCR 



Colorado College 



\ 



Goddard, Mrs 
808 N Cascade 




\ 



/ 



nove:mbe:r. lotH, 1904 

JSlumber 9. 



VOJLX/MB VII. 



Special Rates to Students 

On Rented Pianos 




The KNIGHT - eAMPBELL 
Music Company 



New Lennox Block 



^ pposite North Park 



St. John Bros.™^""^*^"^™^^-* 

Gas and Steam Fitters 

Hot Water Heating a specially 

Prompt attention given to Repair Work. 

Curtis '^oal go. 

Office 132 N. Tejon St. Telephone 91. 

Iry "NE'-V RANGE" for the Kitchen, $400. 
BiruMNOUs Coal at Standard Prices. 

SELDOMRIDGE BROTHERS, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

Fiour, Feed, Grain, Hay and Seeds 

108 South Tejon Street 

Repairing while You Wait Satisfaction Guaranteed 

A complete plant of New Machinery for 
the Manufacture of Fine Boots and JShoes 

The Lightning Shoe Shop 

BROWN & COMPANY 
We make a specialty of Shoes to Measure and Shoes for 
Cripples. 28V^ North Tejon St. Colobaoo Springs 

Visiting Card< in Latest Styles. 



WE SHOW 
YOU 



By advertising in THE TiGER that we 
•• appreciate your custom. 

22 E. Kiowa St. Thc Pfompt Priotery 



The 

Hassell Iron Works Co. 



Founders and Machinists 



7l/e Tl/elcome 



THE STUDENTS, 

new and old, at our studio, 

Corner Cascade and Kiowa 




4* 
♦ 
4* 
4* 
♦ 
4» 

COLLEGE GOWNS, CAPS * 

The Best Workmanship a 

at Lowest Prices 

Silk Faculty Gowns and Hoods 

COX SONS & VINING 

262 Fourth Avenue., NE\^' YORK 




^^ 



Dealer in Kodaks and Supplies. 



FOOT BALLS 

Pants, Nose Guards, 
Tennis Goods 
and Sweaters 



at Strangs 

119 North Telon Street 



Mueth's 

Soda, Ice Sream 

eflTERING 

CHAS. T. FERTIG 

^^al Estate, Loans and Insurance 

29 N, Tejon Street 

T/Ae Colorado Springs Jfiorai Co, 

FLORISTS 



/O^ ^ort/k T7«/on Stf^0t 



DOVGLrAS est HSTHERINGTON 

^yirchiteci^ 

Phone 556-B Rooms 15-16 Ojtwest Bu'ldini;, Col)rado Springs, Colo. 

•I>«l*4*4»4>4>4>4>«l'4>4>4>*l>«i»4*<i*4>4*4*4*<!*4>4*4*<i>4>4>4>4*4*4i4'4*4>4>4<4>4>4'4*4'4*4'4' 



T n a TIGER 



Student's Book Store Books stationery; all rngl- 

«_ neer's Supplies; College Pins 

Centi/ry Fountain Pens $1 to $4, Waterman's $2.50 

REYER&PUTT. 



and Watch Fobs, 
and up. 



For SI 00 Oer month ' ^"^^ sponged and Pressed each week 

— — ^ PANTATORILM. 

17 Fast Bijou, Branch Office opp. Plaza Hotel. 



THE COLORADO SPRINGS CO. 

The Original Locators of 

Colorado Springs and TTfanitou 

is still offering for sale choice 
lots on North Weber Street 
and North Wahsatch Avenue 

Also lots for sale in other parts of Colorado Springs 
and in Manitou 

Apply at ROOMS, OUTWEST BUILDING 



L©UIS STOeK 



steam Dye and Cle ning 
Works 



Office and Works, 115 N. Tejon St. 

TELEPHONE 517-B 

Cleaning, Dyeing, Scouring in all its branches 

Ostrich Plumes Cleaned, Dyed and Curled 

Kid Gloves Dyed and Clean-^d. 



GIDDINGS BROS. 

FINE DRESS Goods and Ladies' 
TAILOR SUITS, Ladies' 
^^'^ Furnishings 



Kiowa and Tejon Streets. 



ZEHNER JEWELRY CO. 

26 P. P. Ave. 

STUDENTS— Our Holiday Good^ are arriving 
daily. Call and see them. 

D. E. MONROE & CO. 
Prescription Druggist 

The best of Drug>, Stationery and Toilet Articles 

NO LIQUORS SOLD. 
Cor. Tei 3M 9( Bifou PHomc 311 Sf 331 

THE HErLEY-ARCULARIUS DRUG CO. 
Drugdists 

Kod.iks, C.imeras and all kind> of Photdgrapliic 
Supplies D \eloping mJ i\''i iting f>r Am lueis. 
Free Delivery. 
Phone 144 2 South lejon Street 



l^ardivarc Bicvclcs 

H. S. BLAKE 

New Chainless Bicycle $35 and $20 
Rambler, Orient and National Automobiles 

Best Repair $bop in city 107 n. €eioii 

nirs^ B* R* Crooks 

Coilet Parlors at 20 6a$t Hioiva 

Also Room 52, Antlers Hotel 

No Apprentices. Only experienced help employed. 

A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 

Largest Manufacturers in the World of Official 
Athletic Supplies 

The football snpplifis manufactured by A. G. SPALD- 
I G & BROS, are the be^^t that can absolutely be produc- 
ed: they are of superior make; they have stood the test fo • 
over twenty eight years, and are used by all intercol iegiate, 
interscholastic and prominent football teams o the 
country. 

SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOTBALL GUIDE. Edited 
by Walter Camp. Contains the NEW RULES for 190i. 
Price, 10 cents. 

SPALDING'S HOW TO PLA\ FOOT BALL. Edi ed by 
Walter ( amp. Newly revi-ed for 1904. _ Pri e 10 cents. 

"If it pertains toa hletics, we make it. " 

A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 

New York, Chicago, Denrer San Francisco, St. Louis 

Send for a co y of Spalding's Fall and Winter 

Sports Catalogue. It's Fr e. 



HENRY TAMM 

Druggist 

PRESCRIPTIOXS 
TOILET ARTICLES 
STATIONERY 

All Popu'ar Drinks Served 
at our Soda Fountain 

Pl.iZa Hotel, Cor. Cache la Poudre & Tejon Sts. 

THE RlIGBY=PRIMROSE COAL CO. 

n\\ Kinds of Fuel 

Phon 481-A Wist 44-A 21 N. TEJON ST. 



H.K 'H- Z 



PORSEUaiN 

H. KRHKZ & 



F. R. SMn H 



Only S Chair Barber Shop in the Cify 

\QkiV% E. ike^s Ptak Ave. 



BATH TUBS 

e©., Barbers 

Try the lectric Vibrassage Machine 
eo ©Raor spn iNGS. e©L©. 



THE TIGER. 



FITS 



CORRECTLY 



copraioHTEO. 

It Slaves You Money and Time 

When I examine your eyes or fit your glasses. My NEW 
METHOD is perfection beyond a doubt. Consultation 
Free. DR. SCHADT, O. D. 

Eyesight Specialist. 
Office 303 Colorado Bldg., cor. Tejon and Huerfano 



Use Gas 



We sell a GOOD FOUNTAIN PEN for $1 

WHITNEY & GRIMWOOD 

Opera House Building 

We are agents for WATERMAN'S IDEAL FOUNTAIN 
Pens. Prices from $2,50 up. 



Watchmaker and Jeweler 

15 South Tjejon Si, 




AND 




1739 Champa St., DENVER, COLO. 



C. W. WARSOP & CO., 205 N. Teion S.. 

Draperies, Upholstery Goods, Furniture. Complete line of Screens, 
Pillows, Pillow Tops, Couch Covers, etc. 



tb» 



Denver 






Denver 



FRANK F. CRIMP 

FLORIST 

Phone 500 5og E. Columbia St. 

Special attention given to Telephone Orders. 



H. E. BOATRIGHT 

u^ubiic Stenographer 

33 GIDDINGS BLDG. 
Rates 5c per 100 words, 50c per hr. extra carbons 5c p er page 



The Gox Shoe go. 

107 S. Tejon St. Colorado Springs, Colo. 
J. M. eox 



LADIES, MISSES AND CHILD- 
REN'S SHOES 

MEN'S, YOUTHS' AND BOYS' 
SHOES 



FRANK H. SMALL watches, Diamonds, fine Watch Work. Special 
Jeweler and Silversmith P"ce to Students. 113 Pike's Peak Ave. 



Vol. VII. 



nhe TIGCR 



COLORADO COLLEGE, NOVEMBER lo, 1904. 



No. 9 




''04F4F4f 4f ^F4f4f^F4f4f^f^ 



ATHLETIC 
DEPARTMENT 

D. U. X 4— C. C. 8 



The unexpected happened at Denver on Satur- 
they could not overcome the lead that the Denver 
firm expectation of victory. The College team 
evidently lost the game through overconfidence 
and poor condition. When the teams lined up for 
the kickoff there was not a football expert that 
did not expect the Tigers to win by a good margin. 
The Denver team hoped to hold the score down. 
But the warriors of the crimson and gold started 
the game with a rush and had scored almost be- 
fore the Tigers had realized what had happened, 
and although the College team fought bravely 
they could not overcome the lead that the Denver 
team had won, and for the first time in modern 
history Denver University won a football game 
from Colorado College. We can scarcely believe 
it, but it must be true. 

The game was a good one from the standpoint 
of the spectator. It was a kicking game through- 
out between Nead and Pate, with the advantage 
in favor of the big Tiger. Denver succeeded in 
breaking the interference and spoiling the end 
runs before they were well started, while on the 
other hand Denver made some good gains 
around the ends. The Tigers made some gains 
on the fake kick, but had to rely on line-bucking 
to advance the ball. Costly fumbles cost each 
team a touchdown, and although neither team was 
conspicuous for its fumbles, Denver was luckier 
at falling on the ball. 

Randolph played a good game at quarter during 
the first half. The little quarter made several 
sensational tackles and saved his team from much 
worse defeat. Scibird did fair work at half, and 
Mack played his usual good game at full. Fiske 
replaced Hill in the second half and did the best 
line-bucking of the game. But Nead was the 
Tiger that played the game all the time in the 



good old way. His punts were long and high, 
giving the ends time to reach the player that re- 
ceived he ball. He often tackled the man behind 
the line for good losses, and was in every play 
fighting for a victory that seemed hopeless. 

Pate, Yundt, Munley, Sabin and Foley played 
the game for Denver. The punting and hurdling 
of E. Pate was one of the features of the game. 

THD GAME. 

Captain Pate of D. U. won the toss and Lennox 
made the kickoff for the Tigers to Yundt on the 
20-yard line. W. Lennox tackled him in his 
tracks. Pate hit guard for no gain, but on the 
next play made 3 through tackle. Yundt made 4 
yards, McNutt 4 and Yundt 5. The College boys 
began to wake up, and Pate was forced to punt to 
Mack on the 20-yard line. Hill went through 
tackle for 5 yards, but on the next play fumbled 
and Pate fell on the ball. E. Pate made a yard 
b) hurdling and McNutt hit tackle for 3. With 
the ball on the Tigers' 20-yard line, Sabin made a 
fake pass, dashed around left end for a touch- 
down, within 8 minutes of play. E. Pate missed 
goal. Score, Denver 5, Colorado College o. 

Pate kicked to Randolph on the 20-yard line, 
and by neat dodging the little quarter carried the 
ball to the middle of the field. Hill made 3 
yards and Mack went through center for 3. Hill 
was caught behind the line for a loss of 2 yards, 
but on the next play made 5. Nead punted to 
Pate, who caught the ball on the 15-yard line 
and made 5 yards before L. Lennox tackled him. 
Pate punted to Randolph on the College 35-yard 
line, and "Shorty" wriggled through a broken 
field for 20 yards. Punts were exchanged and 
Mack worked the fake kick for 20 yards. At 
this juncture the College boys put up a fierce at- 



THE TIGER 



tpck and by steady plunges through the line car- 
ried the ball to Denver's 2j/2-yard line, only to be 
held for downs. Pate and Yundt failed to make 
the distance. Nead blocked the punt and tackled 
Pate behind the line. Score, Denver 5, Colo- 
rado 2. 

A. Pate kicked from the 25-yard line to Sci- 
bird, who carried the ball to the 50-yard line. 
The Tigers again pnt tip a fierce attack. Scibird, 
"Hill and Mack m^de consistent gains until the 
b'lll was on Denver's lo-yard line, where the D. U. 
line again became impregnable. Pate punted to 
Randoloh on the 40-yard line. Randolph heeled 
the c^tch for a free kick, but was interfered with 
by M-^nley and Denver was penalized 15 yards. 
The ball was p^t in scrimmage on Denver's 25- 
yard line. Scibird made 4 yards and Hill 6, but 
Denver held for downs. A. Pate made a brilliant 
drsh of 12 yards around right end, but Yundt and 
McNutt could not gain, and Pate punted to Mack, 
who fumbled the ball, McNutt falling on it. 
Pate and McNutt carried the ball to the College 
40-yard line, where Nead got the oval on a fum- 
ble. On a fake kick, Mack made 4 yards and Sci- 
1")ird and Hill each hit tackle for 7. The whistl.:^ 
blew with the ball in midfield in possession of the 
Tigers. 

Pate opened the second half by kicking to Ran- 
dolph on the 20-yard line. Scibird made 3 yards 
and Nead lost 3 on a fake kick. Nead punted to 
A. Pate on Denver's 40-yard line and L. Lennox 
tackled the Denver captain before he could ad- 
vance the ball. Sabin made a 20-yard dash around 
left end and Pat, Yundt and McNutt carried the 
ball to the 35-yard line, where Yundt dropped the 
ball squarely between the goal posts. Score, Den- 
ver 9, Colorado 2. 

Pate kicked to Randolph on the 15-yard line, 
and the little quarter ran the ball back 15 yards. 
Nead punted to Pate, who carried the ball to 
Denver's 45-yard line. Sabin skirted left end for 
20 yards, and Manley went around the other wing 
for the same distance. Nead tackled Pate be- 
hind the line, but Yundt and McNutt made two 
good plunges and the ball was on the Tigers' 
8-yard line. Pate made 4 yards and McNutt was 
pushed over for the second touchdown. E. Pate 
missed goal. Score, Denver 14, Colorado 2. 

Fiske replaced Hill at left half. On a quarter- 
back run Randolph circled left end for 45 yards, 
the longest run of the game. Fiske made 4 yards 
through tackle, but Denver took the ball on 
downs. E. Pate made 3 yards and Manley 5'. 
Pate tried a double pass but Hedblom tackled him 
for a loss of 2 yards. Fiske made 3 and Scibird 
3, and on a fake kick Seybold, who replaced Sci- 
bird, reeled off 10. Nead punted to Pate on the 
30-yard line and W. Lennox brought him down on 
the spot. On the next play, Nead was offside and 
the College was penalized 5 yards. Gibbs replaced 



Mack at full and Johnston went in at quarter. 
Pate kicked to Johnston on the 35-yard line. 
Fisher replaced W. Lennox at left end. Elliott 
was offside and Denver was penalized 5 yards, 
but Seybold and Gibbs could not gain and Nead 
p'uited to Pate on the lo-yard line. Sabin made 
2 yards and Pate fumbled. Bale falling on the 
ball. Fiske made 3 yards and the College re- 
ceived 5 yards on Denver's offside play. On the 
next play, Nead went outside of tackle and ran 
13 yards, planting the ball directly behind the 
goal posts. Lennox kicked goal. Score, Denver 
14. Colorado 8. 

Nead kicked to Lee, who replaced Yundt. The 
Denver backs carried the ball 20 yards, when 
Pate ki'^ked. The Tigers tried some fake plays 
with indifferent success, and Nead pimted to Pate 
01 Denver's lo-yard line. Time was up. Final 
store, Denver 14, Colorado 8. 

The lineup : 

Tigers. Denver. 

Pale C Foley 

Hedblom R. G Martin 

Roberts, Fawcett .... L. G Sliott, McKay 

Nead R. T Alter 

Howbert L. T Roberts 

L. Lennox, (c) R .E Sabin 

W. Lennox, Fisher ... L. E Manley 

Randolph, Johnston . . . Q A. Pate, (c) 

Hill, Fiske L. H E. Pate 

Scibird, Seybold R. H Yundt, Lee 

Mack, Gibbs F. B McNutt 

Summary — Officials : Risley, umpire ; Hunter, 
referee ; linemen, Johnston of Boulder and Faw- 
cett, Colorado College; head lineman, Owens, 
Boulder. Time of halves, 30 minutes. Touch- 
downs, Nead, McNutt and Sabin ; goal from field, 
Yundt ; safety, Nead ; goals kicked, Lennox ; goals 
missed. Pate 2. Attendance, 1,500. 



C-S-M, U-Rah, U-Rah, 

C-S-M, U-Rah, U-Rah, 
Hoo Rah, Hoo Rah, 

COLORADO 

School of Mines, 

School of Mines, 

School of Mines, 

Rah! Rah! Rah! 
Proud, haughty old Boulder had her colors and 
reputation dragged in the gridiron dust on Tues- 
cay when the School of Mines proved victorious 
by the score of 13 to 10. Boulder would use the 
Colorado teams for practice, but it seems that that 
blue and white bunch of gridiron warriors from 
Golden gave Boulder some rather strenuous prac- 
tice. 



Graduate — Professor, I am indebted to you for 
all I know. 

Professor — Don't mention such a trifle. — Ex.. 



THE TIGER 



FOOTBALL SCORES. 

At Pueblo— Centennial High School, 79; Cutler 
Academy, o. 

At Washburn Field — Colorado Springs High 
School, 55; Cripple Creek, o. 

At Denver— D. U., 14; Colorado College, 8. 

At Denver — Boulder Preps, 5; East Denver, o. 

At Philadelphia — Pennsylvania, 22; Lafay- 
ette, o. 

At New Haven — Yale, 22; Brown, o. 

At West Point— Princeton, 12; West Point, 6. 

At Cambridge — Harvard, o; Dartmouth, o. 

At Ithaca — Cornell, 50; Lehigh, 5. 

At Annapolis — Navy, 20; Pennsylvania State 
College, 9. 

At Ann Arbor— University of Michigan, 36; 
Drake, 4. 

At Chicago — Chicago, 68; Texas, o. 

At Lawrence — University of Kansas, 24; Notre 
Dame, 5. 

At Lincoln — Nebraska, 17; Iowa, 6. 

At Madison — Wisconsin, 36; Beloit, o. 

At Columbus — Illinois, 46; Ohio Statae Uni- 
versity, 0. 

At University of California — California, 11; 
Nevada, o. 



HOW THEY STAND. 

INTr;RCOIvI,EGIATE: LEAGUE). 

Teams. Pld. Won. Lost. Pet. 

Denver University 2 2 o 1,000 

Slate University i i i 500 

School of Mines i i i 500 

Colorado College 2 o 2 000 

Agricultural College 2 o 2 000 



BOWLING. 



Colorado College was certainly "up against 
it" in bowling last Thursday. Although the team 
bowled its highest for the season, Henager's team 
almost made a league record with 2715 pins. For 
all that the College won one game out of the 
three. There were practically no College fellows 
there to root for the team, and it is to be hoped 
that next Thursday, when we bowl the Business 
Men, there will be a large crowd present. For 
the College Smith had the high score and West 
the high totals. The score: 

henager's business coelege. 

Henager 163 181 184 527 

Moore 227 188 182 597 

McDonald 157 I59 152 468 

Miller 201 199 178 578 

Huber 206 176 162 544 



COEORADO COEEEGE. 

Tyler 154 185 

West 189 158 

Smith 154 201 

Glynn 140 169 

Bernard 184 169 



69 


508 


98 


545 


87 


542 


48 


457 


88 


541 



821 



882 896 2593 



THE REPUBLICAN CLUB. 

A most successful career was brought to a 
fitting close last Monday night, when the Re- 
publican Club held its banquet at the Plaza 
hotel. About forty young men were present, all 
of whom did ample justice to the delicious viands. 
When this minor part of the ceremonies was con- 
cluded, President Keyes rose and gave a serious 
outline of the purposes of the club in the main- 
tenance of law and order. He then called on 
Ji.dge Kerr, who gave a delightful talk full of 
rambling reminiscences of the times when the 
G. O. P. was young in years. Dr. Finlay then 
amused the crowd with his apt anecdotes. One 
of them was a perfect dream, as you would say 
of a beautiful dress. Christopher Columbus was 
shown though this great country, beginning with 
the subway and skyscrapers in New York. He 
was fittingly impressed, and remarked that they 
had nothing like them in his day. When he say 
the flying ships at St. Louis he was struck 
speechless. Then on his journey he was brought 
to Colorado, and shown the rogues at Canon City. 
Now he began to feel at home. "Yes," he said, 
"we had lots of them in my day. We used to call 
them Democrats." At the close of the evening 
the quartet rendered two selections with appro- 
priate political hits. 



954 



903 



2715 



CLASS NUMERALS. 

Colorado College has the craze for class nu- 
merals, but unfortunately it is in the wrong di- 
rection. The fellows want to wear their numerals 
h\ conspicuous places to let people know to what 
class they belong. When they are worn in this 
way they have no meaning except that the wearer 
may be a Senior, Junior, or an ' underclassman. 
Should not the wearing of numerals in Colorado 
College mean as much as in Eastern Colleges ? 
Why should a man be allowed to wear the nu- 
merals any more, than to wear an unearned "C?" 
At Bowdoin, Dartmouth, Amherst, Harvard, 
Yale, University of Michigan, and in many other 
places, a college man has to earn the coveted nu- 
merals on the athletic field. If we are to have 
the true College spirit ought we not have a sim- 
ilar regard for our numerals? C. W. L., '08. 



ir/fJS TlGStt 



THE TIOE R. 

Published weekly during the College year by 
The Tiger Publishing Co., in the interest of Colo- 
rado College. 

J. Y. Crothers Editor-in-Chief 

T. Hunter Assistant Editor-in-Chief 

J. I. Muffley Athletic Editor 

Miriam Carpenter Literary Editor 

Mabel Barbee Alumni Editor 

A. H. Fisher Local Editor 

Bert Wasley Business Manager 

C. A. Hedblom .... Assistant Business Manager 

CORRESPONDENTS: 

Mr. Nash, Miss McDowell, Miss Isham, Miss 
Kidder, Mr. Lamb, Mr. Reeks, Miss Arbuckle. 

Subscription, $1.25 per year, payable in advance. 
Single copy, 5 cents. 

The Tiger is forwarded to all subscribers until 
ordered discontinued and all arrearanges are paid. 

Students, Professors and Alumni are invited 
to contribute literary articles, personals and items. 
Contributions must be accompanied by the writer's 
name. 

Address all communications to The Tiger^ 
Colorado College, Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Entered at the Postoffice at Colorado Springs, 
Colo., as second-class matter. 



Patronize Tiger Advertisers 



EDITORIAL 

PIKE'S PEAK NUGGET. 

CUBSCRIPriONS are being taken for the 
Pike's Peak Nugget, which is the annual 
publication of the Junior Class. This book is one 
which every student will cherish in after years. 
All the best jokes of the Faculty are here record- 
ed — and only the best are accepted. The roasts 
on everone but those on oneself are enjoyed im- 
mensely. Indeed, the only thing in the Nugget 
which does not create a feeling of satisfaction is 
your own roast. Not only will you want a Nugget 
oz your own, but you will want others to give to 
your young friends in the High Schools. One of 
the most potent influences in affecting the decis- 
ions of High School students ^s to the College 
they shall attend, is the College Annual. A very 
effective way of showing loyalty to your College 
is by subscribing for a Nugget for circula- 
tion among your friends who are prospective col- 
lege students. Beside the matter of subscription, 
the matter of contribution of literary material to 



the Nugget should begin to receive special atten- 
tion. Never yet has an Annual appeared on time, 
and never has the material contributed by the 
students at large been in as soon as requested by 
the Board. Contribute, for the prizes will be 
worth the effort; subscribe now, for the prices 
will be raised later. 



ARE WE QUITTERS? 

TTHAT question does not look well, we know, but 
the circumstances are such as to make it per- 
tinent. No, we are not thinking of the team, so 
much as of that student body, which was showing 
such intense enthusiasm two weeks ago. You 
may be sure the team does not like to be beaten, 
and will do what it can to prevent such a catas- 
trophe. However, what a team can do depends 
very much on circumstances. It is a well known 
psychological fact that when men are out of their 
heads they sometimes possess extraordinary 
strength. In order to give our team this unusual 
energy, it is necessary to show a sincere and 
hearty appreciation of their labors. That such 
demonstrations do have the desired effect is 
shown by the case of the Nebraska team. After 
their defeat in Colorado the students met them 
with rousing cheers at the station on their return. 
As a direct result, a few weeks later Nebraska 
scored twice as many points agamst Minnesota 
as Michigan could last year. Her showing was 
much better than any but the Nebraska students 
expected. On the contrary, witness the greeting 
(?) given the Tigers on their return from an 
unexpected defeat. If the present conditions ob- 
tain the rest of the season, we can but say at the 
end, "We told you so." 



\A/HEN you are writing articles for the TigeRj 
please remember to sign your name to the 
article. It is necessary that we know the author 
of each contribution, though the public need not 
be in the secret. Unfortunately we can not tell 
everyone in College by his or her initials. If you 
du not want your name known, just make the 
request and it will be observed. 



CROM time to time the Tiger publishes lists of 
books received by Coburn Library. We do 
this because we feel that a very large part of a 
person's education is obtained outside the class- 
room by acquaintance with good books. This is 
the only place to get information as to additions 
to the Library in convenient form. 



Barnum in Rhetoric — ^Professor, does one have 
to be a gasfitter and a shoeman to fix the meter 
an3 arrange the feet in poetry? 



THE TIGER. 



ALUMNI NOTES. 

Lois Stoddard, '02, is teaching school in Lamar, 
Colo. 

Ada Seifried, '04, is pledged to the Gamma Phi 
Beta Sorority at D. U. 

Ben Griffith, L-L. B., has hung out his shingle 
in Grand Junction. Good luck to you, Ben! 

A letter was received last week from John R. 
Thompson. He and Fred Caldwell are attorneys 
and counsellors at law in Oklahoma City. From 
Thompson's letter it is evident that C. C. grad- 
uates are just about running that part of the 
country. He and Caldwell are attorneys for the 
Oklahoman, the leading newspaper of the Terri- 
tory. Ed Gaylord, an old C. C. man, is business 
manager, and Ray Dickinson, '00, is advertising 
manager for the same paper. With such men on 
its staff the Oklahoman must be a close second 
t--) the New York World. 

Mr. M. C. Hacker is preaching at Chicasha, In- 
dian Territory, and at present his people are 
building a $5,000 church. 

F. M. Loud, '04, came home last week to vote. 

Mr. Dwight S. Bayley is having great success 
as pastor of the Congregational church at King- 
fisher, Oklahoma. 

Mr. O. P. Avery recently became pastor of the 
Congregational church in Oklahoma City. He 
was formerly in the Congregational church at 
Deadwood, South Dakota. 

Hugh McLean, '01, has been elected one of the 
editors of the Harvard Law Review. This is 
one of the highest honors that a law student can 
have. 



Editor Tige;r: 

The way in which the Tigers played the Boul- 
der game calls for recognition and applause from 
Colorado College students, old and new. We of 
the Alumni feel a thrill of genuine pride that we 
came from an institution where they play that 
kind of football. Every report says "They fought 
like the true Tigers they are." We can do no 
less than tell you we are proud of you, Tigers. 
The spirit in which Captain Lennex asserts that 
"We shall be heard from in the games to come," 
means victory — victory in the true sense. Ben 
Griffith, our old football star, has opened a law 
office in our town of Grand Junction. In talk- 
ing to him the other day of C. C. football, he re- 
marked that, having seen all the colleges except 



Boulder play, he was confident that C. C. could 
v/hip them all. Of course you can, Tigers. We 
believe in you and, best of all, your student body 
believes in you. Hurrah for the girls ! Their 
support was magnificent. And let every knocker, 
if it be possible there are any, crawl into some 
dark hole and stay there. Any vagabond heard 
to utter a kick deserves eternal ostracism. The 
Tiger spirit is rife again. Second place this year 
nieans first next. Boulder has an exceptioanlly 
good team this season, which is her luck, and this 
will not always last, as well she knows. She has 
not forgotten our scores of 22 to o and 21 to o 
against her. 

With confident hopes in a fighting team and 
a loyal student body, I am, 

P. D. Rice, '04. 



TIGER NOTES. 



Tennis after 10 o'clock at night is hereafter for- 
bidden in Montgomery Hall. By order of the 
Matron. 

Misses Packard and Persinger were the guests 
of Miss Edith McCreery Friday. 

Misses West, Fezer, Whiton and Johnston 
spent several days at their home this week, 

A practical test of the new fire escapes on 
Montgomery was made Thrusday night. 

Miss Vera Rodger spent a few days in Pueblo. 
Would that we were in China ! There you 
can buy a breakfast for a penny. 

Miss Maud Smith entertained the members 
of Hypatia Friday night. The evening was 
spent very pleasantly with games and music. 
Dainty refreshments were served. 

Misses Sims and Baker entertained the W. E. 
girls at a Bohemian spread Thursday night. The 
impromptu speeches and toasts were greatly en- 
joyed. 

The Sophomore Class drank up the last of the 
cider at their party at Kinnikinnick Monday 
night. 

The Freshmen had their annual picnic in North 
Cheyenne Canon election day. 

I think it was fierce. Were they drunk? 

Miss Prevost received a visit from her father 
and brother on Saturday. 



tlia TiGCk: 



The goose eggs in German B are beginning to 
hatch. 

Mr. Hall of Denver visited his daughter, Miss 
Edith Hall, last Sunday. 

Prof. S.— The belief that the cells of trees 
always point in the same direction is a sell. 

Miss Wagner and Miss Porter entertained 
Messrs. Chapman and Middlesworth in Ticknor 
Study Friday evening. 

The Junior-Freshman prayer meetings are 
worth attending. 



THE ENGINEERING LIBRARY. 

Among the books recently secured for the En- 
gineering Department of the Library by Prof. 
Cajori are the following: 

Treatise on Civil Engineering, by D. H. Mahan. 
Metallurgy of Steel, by F. W. Harbord. 
Electric Motor, by H. M. Hobart. 
Text-Book on Roofs and Bridges, by Merriman 

and Jacoby, 
Qualitative Chemical Analysis, by A. A. Noyes. 
Notes on Assaying, by Ricketts and Miller. 
Quantitative Analysis, by Classen and Harriman. 
Ore Dressing, by Richards. 
Buildings and Structures of American Railroads, 

by Berg. 
Design and Construction of Dams, by Wegmann. 
Manufacture and Properties of Iron and Steel, 

by Campbell. 
Manual of Telephony, by Preece and Stubbs. 
Commercial Organic Analysis, by Allen. 
Economic Theory of Railroad Location, by A. 

M. Wellington. 
Gold, the Metallurgy of, by T. K| Rose. 
Quantitative Chemical Analysis, by Fresenius. 
Examination of Water, by Mason. 
Continuous Current Dynamos, by Fisher-Hinnen. 
Dynamos, Alternators and Transformers, by Kapp. 
(jas and Fuel Analysis for Engineers, by Gill. 
Analysis of Milk and Milk Products, by Leffmann 

and Eeam. 
Metal Lograpliy, by Hioms. 
Cyaniding Gold and SiKer Ores, by Julian antl 

Smart. 
. ii I:iiri;(l'Ctioii to tl.e Sl'.uly of Mctall'U-g.v, 

i\i.l)crts Anslin. 
L.ead Smelting, b} lies. 
Handbook of Metall'irsy. by Schnabcl. 
Assaying, by Aaron. 
Manual of .Assaying, b} Frown. 

Jcctiic Transmission cf Encrpy, h_\ K.'ipp. 
Lead and Copper SnieUing, by Hi.xon. 
Manual of Practical Assaying, by Furman. 
Moflcrn Elccrnlyti- Copper Refining, b\- Ull<e 



I)V 



Chemical Analysis of Iron, by Blair . 

Electro-Dynamic Machinery, by Houston and 
Kennelly. 

Microscopic Analysis of Metals, by Osmond and 
Stead, 

Assaying and Metallurgical Analysis, by Rhead 
and Sexton. 

Silver, The Metallurgy of, by Collins. 

Notes and Examples in Mechanics, by Church. 

Design of Dynamos, by Thompson. 

Elasticity and Resistance of the Materials of En- 
gineering, by Burr. 

Stamp Milling of Gold Ores, by Richard. 

Iron, Steel and Other Alloys, by Howe. 



NATURAL REMEDIES. 

Feeling bad? 

Just sing; 
Soon be glad, 

(Sure thing!) 

Worrying? 

Breathe deep ; 
(Just the thing ! 

Safe! Cheap!) 

Feeling mad? 

Here's a cure. 
Smile, my lad, 

(Quick! Sure!) 

Cash all gone? 

Don't groan ; 
Work, my son, 

(Best known!) 

Deep in love? 

Here's a cure ; 
Wed the dove, 

(Great! Sure!) 



BEFORE— 



— Judge. 



There are meters of accent, 

And meters of tone ; 
But the best of all meters. 

Is meet her alone. 

AFTER — 
There are letters of accent, 

And letters of tone ; 
^i^t the best of all letters 

Is let her alone. — Ex, 

"Now," remarked the dog, who was engaged 

in a vain attempt to catch his tail, "now I may 

tr-ily say that I can see my finish." — Harvard 
Lampoon. 



THE TIGER 



SOCIETIES AND ASSOCIATIONS 



APOLLONIAN CLUB. 

Engineering program : 

"The Hydro-Electric Company" Steffa 

"Engineering School" 

"Cog Road" KauU 

Music Quartet 

"City Water Supply" Bartlett 

"Moffat Line" J. Vandemoer 

Debate — "Resolved, That a technical education 

fits a man for general business better than a 

course in liberal arts." 

Affirmative Piatt, Leuchtenburg 

Negative Johnston, Seybold 



MINERVA. 
The meeting of November ii will be closed. 



PEARSONS LITERARY SOCIETY. 

Program, November ii: 

Essay Bortree 

Music Quartet 

Debate— "Resolved, That Ely is correct in his po- 
sition that competition must and can be main- 
tained as an operative principle in industry." 

Affirmative Brugess, French 

Negative Slane, Doane 

Music Orchestra 

Reading Muf fley 



CONTEMPORARY. 

November ii : 

"Rebirth of Japanese Language and Litera- 
ture" Laura Stiles 

"Modern Writers on Japan" Frances Sims 



HYPATIA. 



The meeting on November ii will be devoted 
to parliamentary drill. 



Y. M. C. A. 



The Student Volunteers had charge of last 
Sunday's meeting. Mr. Smith, the first speaker, 
gave a short history of the organization and what 
it stood for. The objects, he said, were to enroll 
a sufficient number of students to supply the 
needs of the foreign field, to prepare those en- 
rolled for their life work and to lay upon the 
minds of students and ministers at home the needs 
of the foreign field. 



Mr. Vories, the next speaker, spoke upon "Why 
I Am a Volunteer." He gave three reasons, first 
the value of action ; second, because of what the 
nMssionaries had done for his ancestors, and be- 
Cc'.use of the life of Christ. 

Mr. Burgess then spoke upon the needs of the 
organization. He said they need more prayers of 
the Christian people, more money and more 
workers in the field. 

The last speaker, Mr. French, told us about 
the Volunteers in Colorado College, closing with 
ar appeal to each one of us that we should look 
iiito our own hearts, and see what God would have 
us do. 

The Sophomore Class wishes to thank the stu- 
dents of the College and Academy for their finan- 
cial support in the Barbecue. The expense and 
receipt accounts do not exactly balance, but the 
class is glad to bear the difference, for the sake 
of keeping up this good College custom. 



. EXCHANGES. 

The sportsman may br?g of the glory 
He's found in the chase, but forsooth, 

The fellow who tells a bear storv 
Completely ignores the bare truth. 



"Well, we have to make allowances," said the 
old gentleman as he wrote out checks for his 
sens in college. — Harvard Lampoon. 

"We've got a dandy college yell, now." 

"What is it?" 

"We give four Russian battleships, a siss- 
boom-ah and then two Japanese generals." — 
Puck. 

The world is old, yet likes to laugh ; 

New jokes are hard to find; 
A whole new editorial staff > 

Can't tickle every time. 

So if you meet some ancient joke 

Decked out in modern guise, 
Don't frown and call the thing a fake ; 

Just laugh; don't be too wise. 

Thermometers are not the only things which 
are graduated and get degrees without having 
brains. 

"Did you just get a haircut?" 

"Yes, can j^ou tell which one?" — College Days. 



IC 



THE flGUR. 



ACADEMY DEPARTMENT 

Earle S. Alden Editor 

P . C. Merrill Athletic Editor 



PHILO. 

Last Friday Miss Park gave a most interesting 
talk about Bryn Mawr College, which was en- 
enjoyed very much by all. Afterwards tea and 
wafers were served. 



HESPERIAN. 



A rousing political rally was held by the society 
last Friday night. The speakers were among the 
most prominent statesmen of Colorado and were 
as follows: Governor Peabody, "My Position;" 
ex-Governor Alva Adams, "What I Will Do for 
Colorado;" Hon. J. Watson-Johnson, "Why Pea- 
body Should Be Elected;" Hon. D. B. Carey- 
Haight, "Down with Militarism." 

The whole meeting was characterized by enthu- 
siasm, which gave itself vent quite freely, though 
Mayor Harris-Walter was able to avert any 
physical expression of sympathy, or the opposite, 
by his commanding presence. 

From all indications both Adams and Peabody 
have a great many supporters in Hesperian.i 
Their votes will be reckoned with later. 



ACADEMY NOTES. 

The O. F. T. girls entertained after the Bar- 
becue Monday night. 

Miss Masi gave a tea last week in honor of her 
guest. Miss Piatt, C. A. ex-'o5. 

Clifford Kaime of E. D. H. S. spent the week 
end with Hoover last week. 



Miss Packard and Miss 
entertained by Miss Rice. 



Persinger are being 



The drawings for singles in the Academy Ten- 
nis Tournament resulted as follows : Conklin- 
Harman, Merrill-Poling, Richardson-Bentley, 
Mitchell-Moore, Alden-Buchanan, Hutchinson- 
Johnson, Jackson . The girls' singles will 

b'" conducted on the "round-robin" plan. The 
entries are Miss Masi, Miss McCreery, Miss Gile, 
Miss Currier and Miss Pierce. 

Maguire, Johnson and several of the fellows 
climbed Cameron's Cone on election day. 

An enthusiastic meeting of the student body 
on Monday was addressed by Prof. Parsons. 



Other speakers were Mr. Fitch, Captain Alle- 
brand and Manager Bernard. 

Alden's parents have been visiting him for a 
few days. 

Lincoln has a good word to say for the Pu- 
eblo public baths. 

Miss Rice gave a delightful party last week 
in honor of Miss Persinger and Miss Packard. 

Hoffman is said to be taking the "rest cure." 

Haight is suffering with a broken shoulder- 
biade which he sustained in the Cutler-Centen- 
nial game. Allebrand was also hurt rather se- 
verely. 

Election day was as nearly a perfect day as 
even Colorado ever shows. The students en- 
joyed it too, on the tennis courts and in the 
canons. 

And the next day it snowed. 

Some of the fellows feel personally responsible 
for part of the very heavy vote which was cast 
in the Springs. 

One of the pleasant surprises of the week was 
the victory of the Miners over Boulder on elec- 
tion day, by a score of 13 to 10. Turn about in 
the championship is fair play. 

The Student Volunteers are very busy taking 
charge of church services in various parts of the 
city. 

Just because "Rip Van Winkle" is really go- 
ing to be given this winter is no excuse for our 
going into a long snooze. 

Keep next Tuesday night open to attend the 
preliminaries of the Interstate Debate. 



CUTLER o, C. S. H. S. 52. 

The: High School Te:rrors Turn the Trick in 

Spite oe the Tendency on Both 

Sides to Seug. 

Captain Allebrand chose to defend the north 
goal, and at 3:10 the High School kicked off to 
Allebrand, who returned 25 yards from the 10- 



THE TIGER. 



II 



yard line. Tuttle made 4 through center, 

Moses I on a short end and the High School was 
penalized 5 yards for holding. Allebrand made 
I yard around left end. Allebrand punted to 
the 3S-yard line and Weller lost 5 on the catch. 
Perkins made 25 on a long end run, Weller 10 
or. the other end, Perkins 15 more, while on the 
next play Weller only made 2 yards and Perkins 
lost 2 on a poor pass. Weller made 15 yards on 
a quarterback kick. On the next play Weller 
made 4 yards, but High School was penalized for 
offside. Perkins made 6, Murphy 4 through cen- 
ter and over the goal line. Morrell missed goal. 
C. S. H. S. 5, C. A. o. 

Lockhart made 25 yards from the 5-yard line 
on the kickoff. Murphy tore off 4 through cen- 
ter, and then a series of 15-yard runs and fake 
passes carried the ball over for the second touch- 
down. Murphy kicked goal. High School 11, 
Academy o. 

Graham kicked off to the goal line. Murphy 
returned the ball 25 yards, when Court made 
25 yards more around left end. Miller and Per- 
kins then started the ball rolling, and when it 
stopped Perkins had it under the goal line. Kicked 
goal. C. S. H. S. 17, C. A. o. 

Weller ran 15 yards from the 5-yard line on 
the kickoff. The High School weight and science 
again told and resulted in a fourth touchdown. 
Murphy kicked goal. 23-0. 

The High School kicked to Allebrand, who re- 
turned 15 yards. On the next down the umpire 
gained 5 on the High School for offisde. Arm- 
strong then made 30 yards on short end, which 
ended the half. 23-0. 

The Academy kicked off to Weller, who re- 
turned 10 yards. The best play in the next series 
was a 35-yard run by Harbert. Score, 29-0. 

On the next kickoff Allebrand made 3 and 
Moses I, but on the next play no gain forced a 
punt, but a poor catch by Graham and a block 
b> Harbert resulted in another touchdown. Score, 
35-0. 

The next touchdown was made in short order 
owing to fumble by Academy. Score, 41-0. 

Twenty-yard runs by Lockhart and Weller soon 
put Murphy over for the eighth touchdown. 47-0. 

Shortly after the last kickoff, Murphy was 
taken out because of injuries, but Kester, who 
went in at half, made good gains and the last 
touchdown came shortly. Score, 52-0. 

Tuttle, Allebrand and Boyes did good work 
at all times. Wilfley saved two touchdowns by 
good tackling. The whole team did its best all 
the time. 

UNDUP. 

Cutler. C. S. H. S. 

Graham L. E Morrison 

Armstrong L. T Hackett 

Boyes L. G Shaw 



Morrell 

... Roe 

Harbert 

. . Court 



Willet C 

Walters R. G 

Hoover R. T 

McRae R. E 

Willfley Q. B Randolph (c) 

Moses L. H Weller 

Tuttle F Murphy-Lockhart 

Allebrand (3) R. H. . . Kester,-Lockhart- 

Perkins 
Linesmen, Bailey, Bennett; referee, Randolph; 
umpire, Johnston ; timekeepers, Hill and Moore. 



C. H. S. 79, CUTLER o. 

The game Saturday was a hard defeat for the 
"Cads." Yet tliey put up a game fight against 
the greatest odds. Outweighed and outclassed at 
every turn, the whole team struggled to the very 
last with the best of courage. Allebrand, Ben- 
nett, Graham, Moses, Haight and in fact every 
man on the team played the game for all he was 
vrortn. We ought to be proud supporters of such 
a team, and it is our misfortune that we are not 
better supporters of it. 



EXCHANGES. 

DELIGHTS OF FOOTBALL. 

His head was jammed into the sand, 

His arms were broken in twain; 
Three ribs were snapped, four teeth were gone, 

He ne'er will walk again. 

His lips moved slow; I stopped to hear 

The whispers they let fall : 
His voice was weak, but this I heard — 

"Old man, who got the ball?" 

— Colorado Collegian. 



Tell us not in mournful numbers 
Cats are harmless little things — 

For the man is dead that slumbers. 
When a cat at midnight sings. 

"Now what do you think?" asked the little 
boy's mother, after she had given him a severe 
box on the ear. 

"I don't think; my train of thought has been 
delayed by a hot box," he answered.— T/ie Stylus. 

"I shall have to crown that tooth," said the 
dentist, indicating a particular molar. 

"Yes," assented the victim. "It's a-king more 
than any of the others." 

Whereupon the dentist mentally decided to 
make the bill about $2.50 higher. — Ohio State 
Journal. 



thh TIGUR 



EXCHANGES 



George— I proposed to that girl, and would Students, if in need of glasses or repairs on 

have married her if it hadn't been for something. ^^^^^^ ^^^ ^^j^^^^ ^^^ Qp^j^^j j^^^^^^^ ^^^ ^j^^^^ 

s It. 6 S 3. 1 Q 

^ 1 \iir, ^ j-1 1 -> established in the county. You will find every- 
Fred — What did she say? 

George— No.— ^roo/^/j^w Life. thing right. 



CHARLES P. BENNETT 

Real Estate, Loans 
and Insurance*^ ^ 

NO. 5 PIKE'S PEAK AVENUE 



ElectroJhermatoriHin Bath Parlors 

124 South Tejon Street 

Hot Air, Electric and Turkish Baths, Electric 

Light. Salt Glow and Packs. 

COLLINS & CO., Props. 



Bookkeeping 
Shorthand 
Typewriting 



CENTRAL 



!^, 



usiness 



Colieffi 



College Estab- 
lished in 
Denver in (887 



L. A. ARNOLD, Pres. J. C. CROY, Prin. 

Nichols Block, 18 and 20 S. Tejon St., 
Colorado Springs, Co!o. 

Rooms inviting, Work Thorough, Teachers up-to-date 



Call or Write for Information. 



THE COLORADO ROAOT 







If you Want 

The "Be^t, 

The QuicHs'St, 
The Mosi 

Satisfactory 



Line to Denver or Pueblo buy a Colo- 



rado & Southern Ticket. Get them at 
City Office, 1 5 N. Tejon. 

J. H. SPRINGER, Commercial Agent. 
Come in and ask questions. 



THE TIGER 



13 



WHEN IN VEED OF CLOTHING, HATS | |HE CliESCENI 
OR FURNISHINGS 



We \\ould suggest that you consult your 

professor as to the best place lo go 

We are willing to abide by their 

judgement as they all trade 

with us. We give spe- 

ial discount to students 

The B. W. DAVIS C OTHING & FUR- 
NISHING CO., 102 N. lejon St. 



BOWLING ALLEYS 



115-117 North Cascade Ave, 

Telephone Main 863 



Private Alleys for Ladies 
Eight Alleys on one Floor 
Special Rates to Parties and Clubs 



DEN riST 

IS South Tjejon St. 



G. W. Pauly, B. S., D. O. Mrs. Lona E. Pauly,R S. D. O. 

Graduates of A. T. Still's Colle^'e of Osteopatby, 

Kirksville,Mo. 

DR. & MRS. PAULY, ?S"vl?o^i\\r 

Office, rooms 303-30i DeGraff BMe:. 118 N. Tpion St., Colo- 
rado Springs, Colo. Ph nes-Officd! Ledl272;Res. Ked323 
Hours 8 to 12 a. m., 1 to 5 p. m. 



F. H. WEEKS 

26 East Bijott St. 

Artistic Portraits and 

all kinds of Photo- 

grapic Work 

Special Rates to Sttidents 



next 



You are next to a good hair cut or shave when you patronize 



The Manhattan Barber Shop, J. R. WEYMAR, Prop. 3o e. bijou 



WHITAKER & GARDNER 

30 N. TEJON ST. 

Headqtfatters for 


'^I^HSg?Y 


eolleqe Shoes 

OF EVERY DESCRIPTION 

We have the best mining and civil engineering boot 
in the market 

WHITAKER & GARDNER 


THE STAR is the leader for prompt 
and satisfactory service. 

SPECIAL RATES to students of col- 
lege and academy 

S. E. BENNETT, College Ag't. 


^he Best Yet 


w. I. Lueas 


COLLEGE PILLOW TOPS shows ever, 
important College Building. Souvenir of 


Columbia, Hartford, Rambler, ideal & Tribune Bicycles 

The oily first-class re air shop in town. Chainless wheels 
a specialty. Wheels for rent. Phone 517- v 1 29 N. Tejon 


College Days. 

Ashford & Roberts^ .'26 n. 

Tejon St. 

15 per cent discount to students on framing 


Broken hearts Can be Mended (Rivlted or Ce= 

mented) By taking them to the hosp'tal for repair- 
ing Cut Glas^ and China. MARIE R. FORBUSH, Art 
Studio, 108 N. Tejon. 



When in doubt, take the safe side. Send bundles to the 
Est.^oyrs. Solorado springs Laundry ralphrice conegeAgt. 



r4 



THE TIGBR. 











Colorado College 




THE OLDEST INSTITUTION FOR 




HIGHER EDUCATION IN THE WEST 




FOUNDED AT COLORADO 




SPRINGS IN J874 




Colorado College now offers advantages of the same 




grade as the best institutions. 






For information concerning Courses of Study, Rooms 






and Board, Physical Culture, etc., apply to 






WM. F. SLOCUM, President, 






or EDWARD S. PARSONS, Dean. 






For information in regard to the College Department of 






Music, inquire of 






EDWARD S. PARSONS, Dean. 






Those wishing information as to the Courses in Drawing, 






Painting, Designing, etc., etc., inquire of 






EDWARD S. PARSONS, Dean. 






For information concerning the Engineering Depart- 






ment, apply to 






FLORIAN CAJORI, 






Dean of Engineering School. 




Cutler Academy 


Cutler Academy is the Associated Prepartory School of 




Colorado College, in which students are prepared for any 






American College. Address, 






M. C. GILE, Principal. 











THE TIGER. 



15 



The Albert Sechrist Manufacturing Co. 

WILL INSTALL GAS and 



1033 16th 
Street 



* 



ELECTRIC FIXTURES 

in your residence at Colorado Springs 
same price as Denver, without extra 
charge. Call and select yrur fixtures^ 
or will send you a catalogue. 



DENVtR, 
tOi.O. 




The Williafflson=Baffner 
Engraving Company 



1633 Arapahoe Street 



DENVER 



The 50-mile-an-hour Wheel 

Reading Standard Bicycles 



SHEFF & RIGGS 



Opposite Plaza Hotel 



Perkins Crockerj/ Co. 

r. A. PERKINS, Manager 

120 9/. Vojon St, 

^ XOagon Load of "^ ^ 

Nc^w Wood Type 

O/" the -Very Latest at 
your Disposal _for 

Wir\dow CsLrds 
Tickets, Flyers etc 

E, JSf CRA \^ I JSf G — U he Finest 

TKe Telegraph Job Rooms use, p. p. Ave. 

Ask wKere TKe Tiger is Printed 



USE THE 
Colorado Midland 

in Going to 

Utah, 

California 

and the 

West 

Best Line to Colorado Po nts 

T^o trains daily Denver to 
Salt Lake City 

H. C. BUSH C. H. SPEERS, 

Traffic Mgr. G. P. A. 

R. T. DUNAWAY, C. P. A. 
Colorado Springs. 




The ©Id 



Surio Store 

Wholesale and Retail 
Dealers in 

GENUINE INDIAN GOODS AND 
CURIOSITIES 

J. S. CANDELARIO, Prop., 

301 and 303 San Francisco Street, 

SANTA FE, N. M. 



NEW EMPIRE THEATRE 3 shows Daily ^^ l Matinee 3 P. M. 

Evenings 7:30 and 8:45 



IOC 



•VAUDEVILLE- 



IOC 



It 



THE TIGER 



El Paso Cleaning & Tailoring Co, Pressing 

10 E. Kiowa St. Phone Main m-k Colo. Springs C eaning 



Dyeing 
Re airing 



Alte ing 
Tail ring 



Prof. Chas. J. Haosdorf 

TE\CHIR OF MANDOLIN, IITAR \ND BANJO 

Music furnished for wedding-, receptions, 

entertainments, etc. 

21 North Tejon. 



Office Phone 509-B 



Resice ce Phone Rtd 871 



DR. BAR Y L MOREHOUSE 



DENTIST 



Hours 9-12, 1:30-5 



Fir-.t N t'l Bank BIdg., room 8 



C. F. Arcularius & Co. 
Jewelers 

Diamonds and Watches 

Fine Jewelry Manufacturing 

9 South Tejon St. Colorado Springs 

The 

Crissey & Fowler Lumber 
Company 

Phone 101 117 to 123 West Vermijo Ave. 

Phone 540 

Monarch Hand 
Laundry 

421 S. Tejon 

KARL L. MOHLER, Prop. 
W. J. WALLRICH, College Agt. 

WE LaUNOER ANYTHING 

FINE CHOCOLATE BON RONS 

Name on every Piece 

Ice Cream, Hot and Cold 

Sodas 

Fresh Candies made exery hour 

UNION ICE AND COAL COMPANY 

W. M BANNING, Prop. 




Coal, mood and Tee 

Dealers in all kinds of Coal and Artificial and 
Natfiral Ice 

Ya d OEIlce, 105 W. Vermiio Ave. City Olfice, 5 N. Tejon 




JOHN MOFPAT 

Tine Cailoring 

Repairing, Cleanini{, Pressing. Special rates to 
College Students 

Over Wal ing's Book Store 16 South Tejon St 



Carriages, Cabs, 

'Busses, Baggage and 

Transfer Wagons 

Office, 15 North Cascade 



Denver Law School 

Law Department of the 
University of Denver 

Three years' course leading to the degree of 
Bachelor of Laws. Courses in Mining and Irri- 
gation Law. Full resident faculty. For informa- 
tion address 

LUCIUS W. HOYT, Dean 

Ernest & Cranmer BIdg., Denver, Colo. 

Did You Know 

That our stock of package crackers is so 
great in its variety that you could have a 
change for every day for more than two 
months and yet not exhaust our list? Well, 
it's a fact. We have a kind for every pos- 
sible time and occasion — and they are all 
good. Finest bakery goods in the city. 
Fancy Groceries 

W. N. BURGESS, 112 N. Tejon St. 

Tilsworth & Davidson 
DAIRY 

2 MILFS S. E OF ' QFORADO SPRINGS. P. 0. BOX b 

The Houck-Davidson Coal and Transfer Co. 

Dealkt?s In 

CANON CITY, MAITLAND 

AND LIGNITE COAL 

Phone 473-B. Office U8 N. Tej n. P O Bex 275 
Colorado Springs, Cclo. 



X See 

t mi 



U/^e Gowdy-Simmons Printing Company 

FOR WINDOW CARDS, TICKETS, ETC. ENGRAVED 
CARDS AND INVITATIONS ON SHORT NOTICE 




2/ Tforth 
Jjejon St, 



COTRELL & LEOVARD, 

aLHRNY. N. Y. 

Makers of CAPS and GOWNS 

to American Colleges and 

Universities 



THE DERM TEA ANO COEfEE CO. 

Dealers in TEAS, COFFEES, SPICES, 
EX TRACTS, BAKING POWDERS, Etc. 



Phone 575 



29 S. Tejon St, ^ 



4* 
4* 
4» 

4- 



The PeopIe^s Grocery and Market 



PHONE MAIN 868 



222 EAST PIKE'S PEAK 



S. JAMES & SON, Props. 



Colorado Springs, Colorado * 



ST. JOHN & BARNES 

Oldest and largest plumbing and heating 

establishment in city. Your 

patronage solicited 



Telephone 13 



206 N. Tejon St. 



Phone Main 151 Established 1897 

D. W. SMIIH 

FAMILY GROCER, TEA AND 
COFFEE MERCHANT . : : : : 
Orders Called for and Promptly Delivereui 

731 N. Weber St. Colorado Springs, Colo. 



* We Scored A Goal 

When we secured the exclusive 
agency in Colorado Springs for 
the genuine 

Canon City Coal 

The Colorado Springs 

Fuel Co. 112 Pke's Peak Av. 

TELEPHONES 230, 213 



For 6oodne$$ Sake«« 



Use TUDOR lower vein Coal 
It beats all other Lignite 

TUDOR CO\L COMPANY, Cor. Cascade and Cucharas 

(Ask your dealer for 

VICTOR 

Athletic 



Supplies 




THE SCOTT SIPPLY and 
TOOL COMPANY 




1725-31 Blake St. Denver, Colo. 



♦ USE ELECTRIC LIGHT 

* IN YOUR HOMES 



The Colorado Springs Electric Co. 



4>4»4*<»4>4>4»4>4>4*4>4>4*4»<|i4'4'4*4*4»*i»4*4>^4><l*4>4>4*4>4>4»4>4>4>4>4»4*4i4*<>4* 






4*- 

The Yo\ing Mexi^s Store* •► 



Fai.sKiotvai.ble Suits 

For IToxitiL^ Men 



HERB YOU CAN SBB BVBRY NBW "PAD" 
IN YOUNG MEN'S WEARING APPAREL. 
OUR "HARVARD" AND "UNIVERSITY" 
STYLES IN SACK SUITS ARE PARTICU- 
LARLY SUITED FOR COLLEGE WEAR, 
$13.00, $18.00 AND $20.00. 



SPECIAL DISCOUNT 
TO ALL STUDENTS 



HOLBROOK & PERKINS 



THE DENVER FIRE CLAY CO. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 
AND DEALERS IN 






Chemical and Physicial Apparatus and Chemicals t 



A FULL LINE OF LABORATORY SUPPLIES AND ASSAY GOODS 
Write for Illustrated Catalogues 



1742-1746 Champa Street, 



DENVER, COLORADO I 

♦ 

* 

* 



V' 



^hoto^fraphs 



at BINGHAM & WOeD'S, 18 S. Tejon 



H. C. COLBURN, Pres. E. A, COLBURN, Jr., Sec'y and Treas. 

The ^yiniters ,^yitifomobile Co. 

LiVERY. STORAGE, REPAIRING 

Telephone Main 122 8-10 J^, J^eOada A.-Ve. Colorado Springs, Colo, 




O. E. HEMENWAY 



Groceries and Meats 



us South Tejon St. 
Colorado Springs^ Colorado 



******4'****4»**4»*4'*4»***4»*********«|i4»4'******** 




* 
•I* 

•I* 

♦ 

4» 
4> 
4* 

♦ 
•I* 

4* 



£H£ TIGBR 



Coloratdo College 



\ 



I.Goddard, Mrs 
1808 N Cascade 




/ 



nove:mbe:r. i7tK, 1904 

VOr^ViVJB V//. J^umber lO. 



4*4>«i>4'<|i4*4>4*4*4*4»4'4*4>«i*^4*4*4*4»<i*4*4*4*4*<i»4*4*4*4> 4*t^4' 4*4*4>4»4*4'4*4*4»4»4*4* 



Special Rates to Students 

On Rented Pianos 




The KNIGHT -eaMPBELL 
Music Company 



Rew Lennox Block 



Opposite North Park 



St. John Bros-r"'"^"^™"^"* 

Gas and Steam Fitters 

Hot Water Heating a Specialty 

Prompt attention given to Repair Work. 

gurtis (goal go. 

Office 132 N. Tejon St. Telephone 91. 

Try "NEW RANGE" for the Kitchen, $4.00. 
BiTUMNOUs Coal at Standard Prices. 



SELDOMRIDGE BROTHERS, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

Fiour, Feed, Grain, Hay and Seeds 

108 South Tejon Street 

Eepairing while You Wait Satisfaction Guaranteed 

A complete plant of New Machinery for 
the Manufacture of Fine Boots and Shoes 

The Lightning Shoe Shop 

BROWN & COMPANY 
We make a specialty of Shoes to Measure and Shoes for 
Cripples. 281^ North Tejon St. Colorado Springs 

Visiting Cards in Latest Styles. 

vniT ^^ advertising in THE TIGER that we 

I IIU ........... appreciate your custom. 

/^•^ 22 E. Kiowa St. Thfi Pfompt Printefj 
The 

Hassell Iron Works Co. 



Founders and Machinists 



2l/e 2t/elcome 



THE STUDENTS, 

new and old, at our studio, 

Corner Cascade and' Kiowa 




4» 
♦ 

4* 
4* 

4* 
4* 

♦ 

COLLEGE GOWNS, CAPS * 

4» 
4» 
* 




TTUM f 



Dealer in Kodaks and Supplies. 



The Best Workmanship 
at Lowest Prices 



Silk Faculty Gowns and Hoods 

COX SONS & VINING 

262 Fourth Avenue., NEW YORK 



F0OT BALLS 

Pants, Nose Guards, 
Tennis Goods 
and Sweaters 



at Strangs 

119 North Tejon Street 



Mueth's 

Soda, Ice Sream 

eATERING 

CHAS. T. FERTIG 

'Jieal Estaie, Loans and Insurance 

29 N. Tejon Street 

TjAe Colorado Spr/n^s floral Co* 

FLORISTS 



4^ 
4* 
* 
4> 
4* 
* 
4> 
4* 
4* 
4* 
4» 
4* 
4» 
4* 
♦ 
4* 



yO^ 9/oi-tA TTttyon Stroat 



DOVGLrAs (Si he:the:iungton 

Phone 556-B Rooms 15-16 Outwest Building, Colorado Springs, Colo. 

4*4'4*4'4»4*4*4*4*4>4*4*4»4*4>4*4*4>4*4*4*4*4*4»4*4*4»4>4»4»4*4*4»4>4>4>4'4*4»4'4*4*4*4* 



THE TIGER 



Student's Book Store Books stationery; an Engi- 

__^__^_^___ neer's Supplies; College Pins 

and Watch Fobs. Century Fountain Pens $1 to $4, Waterman's $2.50 

""^ "P- REYER & PLATT. 

For $1 00 P6r month ' ^"'^ Sponged and Pressed each week 
—^ ^ PANTATORIUM. 



17 East Bijou, Branch Office opp. Plaza Hotel. 



THE COLORADO SPRINGS CO. 

The Original Locators of 

Colorado Springs and 97faniiou 

is still offering for sale choice 
lots on North Weber Street 
and North Wahsatch Avenue 

Also lots for sale in other parts of Colorado Springs 
and in Manitou 

Apply at ROOMS, OUTWEST BUILDING 



LOUIS STOeK 



steam Dye and Cleaning 
Works 



Office and Works, US N. Tcjon St. 
TELEPHONE 517-B 

Cleaning, Dyeing, Scouring in all its branches 
Ostrich Plumes Cleaned, Dyed and Curled 
Kid Gloves Dyed and Cleaned. 



GIDDINGS BROS, 

Fine Dress Goods and Ladies' 
Tailor Suits, Ladies' 
furnishings 

Kiowa and Tejon Streets. 

ZEHNER JEWELRY CO. 

26 P. P. Ave. 

STUDENTS— Our Holiday Goods are arriving 
daily. Call and see them. 

D. E. MONROE & CO, 
Prescription Drugflist 

The best of Drugs, Stationery and Toilet Articles 

NO LIQUORS SOLD. 
eor. Tefon Sf Bijou Phone 311 Sf 331 

THE HEFLEY-ARCUURIIJS DRUG CO. 
Druggists 

Kodaks, Cameras and all kinds of Photographic 
Supplies. Developing and Printing for Am ituers. 
Free Delivery. 
Phone 144 21 South Tejon Street 



l^ardware Bicvclcs 

H, S. BLSKE 

New Chainless Bicycle $35 and %2o 
Rambler, Orient and National Automobiles 



Best Repair $bop in city 



107 n. Ceion 



nirs. If. K. Crooks 

Collet Parlors at 20 East Kiowa 

Also Room 52, Antlers Hotel 

No Apprentices. Only experienced help employed. 

A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 

Largest Manufacturers in the World of Official 
Athletic Supplies 

The football supplies manufactured by A. G. SPALD- 
ING & BROS, are the best that can absolutely be produc- 
ed; they are of superior make; they have stood the test for 
over twenty-eight years, and are used by all intercollegiate, 
interscholastic and prominent football teams o the 
country. 

SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOTBALL GUIDE. Edited 
by Walter Camp. Contains the NEW RULES for 1904. 
Price, 10 cents. 

SPALDING'S HOW TO PLAY FOOT BALL. Edied by 
Walter ( 'amp. Newly revised for 1904. Pri e 10 cents. 

"If it pertains toathletics, vpe make it." 

A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 

New York, Chicago, Denver San Francisco, St. Louis 

Send for aco y of Spalding's Fall and Winter 

Sports Catalogue. It's Fr e. 

HENRY TAMM 

Druggist 

PRESCRIPTIONS 
TOILET ARTICLES 
STATIONERY 

All Popular Drinks Served 
at our Soda Fountain 

Plaza Hotel, Cor. Cache la Poudre & Tejon Sts. 



THE RUGBY=PR1MR0SE COAL CO. 

HII Kinds of Fuel 

Phone 481-A West 44-A 21 N. TEJON ST. 



H.KRAiMz peReBLniN 

H. KRHNZ & 

Only 8 Chair Barber Shop in the City 

106H B. Piiie's Peak Ave. 



BATH TUBS F. R. SMITH 

e©., Barbers 

Try the i lectric Vibrassage Machine 
eOLORADO SPRINGS. eOLG. 



THE TIGER. 



FITS 



CORRECTLY 



COPyBIQHTED. 

It Saves You Money and Time 

When I examine your eyes or fit your glasses. My NEW 
METHOD is perfection beyond a doubt. Consultation 
Free. DR. SCHADT, O. D. 

Eyesight Specialist. 
Office 303 Colorado Bldg., cor. Tejon and Huerfano 



Use Gas 



We sell a GOOD FOUNTAIN PEN for Ji 

WHITNEY & GRIMWOOD 

Opera House Building 

We are agents for WATERMAN'S IDEAL FOUNTAIN 
PENS. Prices from $2.50 up. 



Watchmaker and Jeweler 

15 South Ueyon Si, 




AND 




1739 Champa St., DENVER, COLO, 



C. W. WARSOP & CO.. 



205 N. Tejon St. 



Draperies, Upholstery Goods, Furniture. Complete line of Screens, 
Pillows, Pillow Tops, Couch Covers, etc. 



1b» 



Denver 






Denver 



FRANK F. CRIMP 

FLORIST 

Phone 500 509 E. Columbia St. 

Special attention given to Telephone Orders. 



H. E. BOATRIGHT 

Public Stenographer 

33 GIDDINGS BLDG. 

Rates 5c per 100 words, 50c per hr. extra carbons 5c per page 



The eox Shoe 60. 

107 S. Tejon St. Colorado Springs, Colo. 
J. M. eex 



LADIES, MISSES AND CHILD- 
REN'S SHOES 

MEN'S, YOUTHS' AND BOYS' 
SHOES 



FRANK H. SMALL watches, Diamonds, fine Watch Worl<. Special 
Jeweler and Silversmith P"ce to Students. 113 Pike's Peak Ave. 



Vol. VII. 



Vhe TIGCR. 



COLORADO COLLEGE. NOVEMBER 17, 1904. 



No. 10 




' ^ f^f4f^f4f^F4f4F^F4f4f^F^ 



ATHLETIC 
DEPARTMENT 

C. C. 4— C. A. C. 



The Tigers went up to Fort Collins on Satur 
day and played a game of football with the Agri- 
cultural College team, the C. C. boys being victo- 
rious by iht small score of 4 to o after a long 
drawn out and poorly played game. We were 
much disappointed that our team did not simply 
overwhel mthe Aggies, who have a very light and 
inexperienced bunch of players. The Tigers kept 
the ball in the Aggies' territory during nearly all 
of the game and outplayed them, but were three 
times held for downs when within striking dis- 
tance of the Aggies' goal. 

The Tiger backs were so slow that the holes 
opened by our linemen were closed by the Aggie 
bcxks before the man with the ball could reach 
the line. It is not the purpose or intention of this 
paper to roast, but a liberal injection of ginger 
and general football spirit into the team, and 
especially into the backfield, would make a differ- 
ence in the scores and bring more victories to the 
College. 

The only score was made during the first half, 
when Captain Lennox made a place kick from 
the 25-yard line. The Tigers succeeded several 
times in rushing the ball to the 5-yard line only 
to lose it on downs. Their goal was only once 
i'.'. danger, and it occurred when Wilson, the 
Aggie halfback, skirted left end and would have 
made a touchdown but for a costly fumble. A 
Tiger fell on the ball. 

Randolph and Johnston, the fast quarterbacks, 
were both injured, and Fisher finished the game. 
IvINe;up. 

C. C. C. A. C. 

Lennox (c), R. E L. E., Kennedy 

Vandemoer, R. T L. T., Green, Hamilton 

Hedblom, R, G. . ....... ... ..... E. G., A. Smith 

Bale, C C, Farnsworth 



-7/]i, Roberts. L. G R. G., Tanner 

Nead, L. T R. T., L. Smith 

Fisher, W. Lennox, L. E R. E., Chase 

Scibird, R. H. B R. H. B., Hamilton, Daniel 

Hill, L. H. B L. H. B., Wilson 

Mack, F. B F. B., Manheart 

Randolph, Johnston, Fisher, Q. B.. . .Q. B., Collins 
Referee, McCoy, C. S. ; umpire, Ewing, Chi- 
cago ; timers, Hurley, C. A. C, Hurlbut ; linemen, 
Jones and Squier ; time of halves, 30 minues ; 
score, C. C. 4, C. A. C. o. 



On Tuesday the University of Colorado did 
that which she would have been compelled to do 
v.'ithin three months — to withdraw from the Inter- 
collegiate League of Colorado. The withdrawal 
is the result of conflicting games on Thanksgiv- 
ing afternoon in Denver. Boulder refused to play 
Denver University on that date, nor would she 
schedule a game with any other Colorado team. 
So the schedule was adopted last spring 
whereby Denver University and the State School 
of Mines have the Thanksgiving daate at Denver. 
In the face of this fact, Boulder scheduled a game 
in Denver with Stanford University for the 
Thanksgiving date. The School of Mines and 
Denver University raised a protest, but Boulder is 
determined to play the game as scheduled, which 
is deemed an unfriendly act and exactly contrary 
to the constitution of the Intercollegiate League. 
The results of Boulder's action would certainly 
have led to her expulsion from the League, but 
she anticipated it and has withdrawn. 

Boulder's action is a good thing for college 
athletics in Colorado. Boulder has not stopped 
a1 anything that could put a winning team into 
the field. All kinds of inducements have been 
offered to athletes throughout the country to 



THB TIGBR 



play on the State University teams. Last year 
Coach Cropp brought to Bonlder several football 
players who stayed until the football season was 
over, and then their education was completed. 
One player left on the very train which carried 
away the team that played the final championship 
game with Boulder. 

Boulder has used unfair means not only in 
making her team but also in winning games. It 
is almost a miracle for a team to defeat Boluder 
in baseball on her own grounds, but she is an 
easy proposition anywhere else than on Gamble 
Field. The Boulder football team shows the least 
possible regard for the rules of the game. On 
almost every play the interference holds the op- 
posing player. 

Very seldom can officials be found who have 
the courage to lay penalties where they belong. 
In the gaem at Denver on Saturday Andrews to- 
tally disregarded Boulder's transgression of the 
rules, especially holding in the line, and of course 
Boulder was able to run up a big score. But there 
was once when the officials were attentive and 
courageous enough to penalize the offenders. It 
was on election day at Golden, and the hereto- 
fore invincible team from Boulder got its deserts. 
Deprived of their favorite method of ground- 
gaining, the heavy Boulder team was completely 
outplayed and defeated by their lighter and more 
spirited opponents. It does us good to have a 
team that does creditable work in the classroom 
and is composed of pure amateurs defeat a bunch 
of athletes gleaned from all parts of the country 
for the sole purpose of making a winning team. 
With Boluder ou tof the League, there will be 
competition between strictly amateur teams. 

Boulder is ambitious to compete with state uni- 
\ersities and will use the state teams for prac- 
tice. The Miners proved that Boluder can get 
about as strenuous practice as she can stand right 
here in Colorado. It would not seem that Boulder 
would want a repetition of last year's game at 
Lincoln, when the Nebraska boys so demoralized 
the Boulder team that during the second half, in- 
stead of the usual signals the quarterback named 
the place where the play would go, and during the 
whole game the Corn-huskers did not kick once 
nor lose the ball on downs. Nebraska could this 
year beat Boulder by 20 points on neutral grounds. 

We are glad that Boulder has done it. We 
wish her success in her higher calling, and hope 
that Colorado will at the next session of the 
legislature establish a special athletic fund for 
the promotion of interstate athletics. 



bers present were Professors Gile, Hills, Loud, 
Parsons, Pattison and Shedd and Miss Hubbard 
and Miss Loomis. The charter had come a few 
days before. This has been framed and will be 
placed in the Library. The officers for this 
year are Professor Parsons, President, and Pro- 
fessor Loud, Secretary-Treasurer. The follow- 
ing is a part of the constitution adopted : 

"The object of the Phi Beta Kappa Society is 
the promotion of scholarship and friendship 
among students and graduates of American col- 
leges. The members of this chapter shall be 
elected primarily from the best scholars of the 
graduating classes of the College; secondly from 
the graduates of said College whose post-grad- 
uate work entitles them to such honor ; and 
lastly from any persons distinguished in letters, 
science or education. In addition to scholarship, 
good moral character shall be required as a qual- 
ification of membership." 

The charter permits the local chapter to elect 
one-fourth of the graduating class, but it was de- 
cided to be conservative and elect, for the present, 
only one-seventh of each class. Among the by- 
laws adopted were the following: 

"One-seventh of the regular members of each 
graduating class in the College of Liberal Arts 
o-*^ Colorado College shall be eligible to member- 
ship at the end of the first semester of the 
Senior year ; provided, however, that no student 
shall be eligible who does not take his Junior 
and Senior year in Colorado College, or who has 
not received a grade-mark of ninety out of a po??- 
sible one hundred in at least one-half of his Col- 
lege work." 

The first election of members will take place 
scon after the beginning of the second semester 
of this academic year, and one-seventh of the 
Senior class will be chosen, provided that a suf- 
ficient number have made the requisite grade 
1!' their College work. 



PHI BETA KAPPA SOCIETY. 

Last Friday evening the members of the Phi 
Beta Kappa Society met in the Dean's office and 
adopted a constitution and by-laws. The mem- 



COLLEGK VS. UNIVERSITY. 

There is much confusion in this country with 
regard to the use of the words "college" and 
"university." In England a university is an 
pcffregation of collesres, while in Germany a uni- 
A-ersity is an institution for advanced or "grad- 
v:,fe" work. The German use of the word is 
gradually coming- to be accepted here, but there 
is so much confusion in view of the fact that 
many of our large institutions have both a col- 
lege and a university under one head. 

In Germany it is not so. But in the United 
States there is not a single universty that does 
not have its college. At Harvard, for instance, 
there is Harvard College, which offers a course 
of study leading to the degree of B. A.,- and 
.there is .Harvard University with its Graduate 



THE TIGER 



School and its Schools of Law and Medicine, to 
which students are not admitted without the 
bachelor's degree. A student that goes to Har- 
vard as a Freshman and takes the four years' 
course leading to the B. A. degree is in no 
sense a university student, nor can he say truth- 
fully that he has been to Harvard University. 
He has been merely a student in Harvard Col- 
lege. In a few of the larger institutions, as for 
instance Harvard, Columbia, and Johns Hopkins, 
students must have taken the bachelor's degree 
before being admitted to the professional schools; 
but in the great majority of the larger institu- 
tions this is not so. In all the Western state 
universiies, for example, students are admitted 
to the schools of law or medicine directly from 
the high schools. Such students are, strictly 
speaking, neither college nor university students, 
and hence the confusion in the use of the words. 
While there is no university without a college 
attached, there are many colleges that are not 
connected with a university. When a student 
decides to take a college course, the question 
arises whether he shall enter the college of a large 
institution or whether he would better go to a 
separate college. At present there is a general 
feeling that the separate college is the better. 
The reason is this : In the large institutions 
where the college and the university are under 
one management, the head professors save them- 
selves for their "graduate" or university students, 
and do not care to teach college or "undergrad- 
ui.te" students. A study of the catalogues of 
most of the larger institutions will show that 
the undergraduate students are, for the most part, 
ti:rned over to young instructors and fellows. In 
the separate college the undergraduate receives 
instruction from the professors, and is not at 
the m.ercy of recent graduates. For graduate, or 
university, work there is no choice, and the stu- 
dent should go to the university. that offers the 
best instruction. Undoubtedly, the best course 
is to take one's bachelor's degree in a separate 
college, and then go to a university that does not 
admit students without the bachelor's degree. 
In this connection, it is amusing to hear stu- 
dents that have been at Harvard College, Yale 
College or some such institution, speak glibly of 
having been university students. As a matter of 
fact, they have been college students, and have 
not been in a university at all, and it is very 
doubtful if they have received as good instruc- 
tion as they would have received in a separate 
college. 



Minneapolis 28, Wisconsin o. 

St. Louis — Kansas 12, Washington o. 

West Point— West Point 41, New York Uni- 
versity o. 

Kvanston— Northwestern 12, Illinois 6. 

Denver — University of Colorado 57, Denver 
University o; Manual High School 10, East 
Denver o; West Denver 5, Boulder Preps o. 

Fort Collins — Colorado College 4, Aggies o. 

Oberlin — Oberlin College 4, Ohio State Uni- 
versity 2. 

Providence — Brown 41, Colby o. 

Annapolis — Navy 5, University of Virginia o. 

Iowa City — Iowa 69, Grinnell o. 

Philadelphia 18, Indians o. 



SELF-POSSESSION. 

On account of the dissipated habits of the as- 
sistant bookkeeper the head of the firm had de- 
eided to fire him, but in the kindness of his heart 
he proceeded to break the news to him gently. 

"Mr. Debbit," he said, "I am sorry to learn 
that you have made up your mind to resign from 
our employ, your resignation taking effect four 
weeks from today." 

But the assistant bookkeeper did not lose his 
p^-esence of mind. 

"Yes," he replied, "I find the close confine- 
ment of the office has begun to affect my health. 
But I want to thank you, Mr. Spotcash, for your 
kindness in making me a present of $250 in view 
of my long service with the firm, and in offering 
me the privilege of resigning now, if I prefer, 
Vvith a further present of two weeks' salary." 

Mr. Spotcash was somewhat taken aback, but 
he made out a check for the amount and handed 
it over. 



FOOTBALL SCORES. 



An Irishman stood in front of an electric fan 
at the Tortoni which was going at full speed 
with no end of a buzz. After a minute or two 
he scratched his head and said: "Bedad, I 
wadn't want to be that squirrel for anytthing." — 
Rocky Mountain Collegian. 

"When I was once in danger from a Hon," 
said an African explorer, "I tried sitting down 
and staring at him, as I had no weapons." 

"How did it work?" asked his companion. 

"Prefectly. The lion didn't even offer to 
touch me." 

"Strange. How do you account for it?" 

"Well, sometimes I've thought it was because 
I sat down on a branch high up in a very tall 
tree." 



Yale 12, Princeton o. 

Hanover, N. H. — Dartmouth 15, Amherst 4. 

Berkeley — Stanford 18, California o. 



Teacher — Now, boys, what animal supplies you 
with boots and gives you meat to eat? 
First Boy (promptly) — Father. 



thb Tiger. 



THE TIGER, 

Published weekly during the College year by 
The Tiger Publishing Co., in the interest of Colo- 
rado College. 

J. Y. Crothers Editor-in-Chief 

T. Hunter Assistant Editor-in-Chief 

J. I. Muffley Athletic Editor 

Miriam Carpenter Literary Editor 

Mabel Barbee Alumni Editor 

A. H. Fisher Local Editor 

Bert Wasley Business Manager 

C. A. Hedblom .... Assistant Business Manager 

CORRESPONDENTS : 

Mr. Nash, Miss McDowell, Miss Isham, Miss 
Kidder, Mr. Lamb, Mr. Reeks, Miss Arbuckle. 

Subscription, $1.25 per year, payable in advance. 
Single copy, 5 cents. 

The Tiger is forwarded to all subscribers until 
ordered discontinued and all arrearanges are paid. 

Students, Professors and Alumni are invited 
to contribute literary articles, personals and items. 
Contributions must be accompanied by the writer's 
name. 

Address all communications to The Tiger. 
Colorado College, Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Entered at the Postoffice at Colorado Springs, 
Colo., as second-class matter. 



Patronize Tiger Advertisers 



EDITORIAL 

VICTORY ! 

I AST Saturday the Tigers won their most glo- 
rious victory of the championship season. 
Enthusiasm among the students runs riot. The 
town was painted vermilion by the surprised 
supporters of the Tigers. Any afternoon dur- 
ing practice time the bleachers may be seen 
filled with P. B. T's. urging on their dear old 
Tigers with the "never say die" spirit. Doubt- 
less the remarkable improvement in form made in 
the last two weeks is due to this most magnifi- 
cent support on the part of the students. In 
Saturday's game the Tigers demonstrated fheir 
ability to kick, if nothing else. Inspired by their 
example, some people have been trying to emu- 
late them ever since. To be sure we are largely 
indebted to the Aggies for this splendid, unprece- 
dented victory. Twice did a fleet Farmer get a 
clear field with the ball, but evidently he had 
never had that experience before, for both times 
he became stage struck and dropped the ball 
like a hot potato. Or perhaps it was out of the 



kindness of his heart, or he knew the Tigers 
would feel rather awkward with another ^ove- 
knot tied in their tails. The poor old tail is 
already as knotted as an ancient oak. Let the 
other colleges of the state fear and tremble. 
Despise not the day of small beginnings. Remem- 
ber the words of .the poet who said, 

"Great oaks from little acorns grow ; 
Great aches from little toe-corns grow." 
So, we are not discouraged by the present sit- 
uation, but believe that some sweet day the 
Tigers will be the cocks of the roost. 



A WORD TO THE WISE. 

'T'HE present week is the busiest since the be- 
ginning of this College year, but we may ex- 
pect many like it in the months to come. Many 
interests beside those of the textbook are de- 
manding a part of the student's time. The 
greater part of our education is not received 
from textbooks, but from getting into touch with 
the active world. 

One of the best ways to do this is to hear and 
see men who have done things in the world. An 
excellent opportunity is offered this evening to 
hear one of the great men of the country. No 
person who can possibly attend Mr. Riis's lecture 
should miss it. At the same time, you should not 
neglect your studies. It will be possible to do 
both things if you arrange your work systemat- 
ically. A great deal more can be accomplished 
by working according to a well-arranged sched- 
ule. This may be a trite saying, but it seems to 
need more emphasis. 



nrllE Tiger hopes to make its appearance on 
Wednesday of next week, due to Thanks- 
giving on Thursday. Please get your copy in 
early ! 



MEETING OF TWO ILLUSTRIOUS MEN. 

During the year 1904 — or it might have been 
1905 — Colonel Henry Watterson, grown weary of 
the task of trying to hold this blasted country 
back from its headlong plunge to destruction, 
went to Europe for rest and recreation. 

While there he visited Count Tolstoi. 

"By the way, colonel," asked Count Tolstoi, 
during a pause in the conversation, "are you a 
prohibitionist?" 

"I am not," said Colonel Watterson. 

"I am glad to hear it," rejoined the count. 
"Neither am I." 

At which point they irrigated. 



Band Director — Is that note flat? 
Freshman — No, it's round. 



TH£ TlGBR. 



ALUMNI NOTES. 

D. L. Schneider, C. C. ex-'o4, Wisconsin '04, 
is in the insurance business and has met with 
good success. After a trip to St. Louis he ex- 
pects to take up this line of work in Minnesota. 

R. S. Butler, C. C. ex-'o4, Michigan '04, is at 
the head of the commercial courses in the Ra- 
cine (Wis.) High School. With his customary 
modesty "But" avers that his knowledge of the 
subject would not strain the capacity of a con- 
siderably less intelligent individual, but he is 
making good none the less. 

C. W. Hurd, '02, is in the employ of the A. T. 
& S. F. railroad at Great Bend, Kansas. 

Chase Kelley, C. C. ex-'o5, graduates from Wis- 
connsin this year. 

On the occasion of tne Michigan- Wisconsin 
game a number of C. C. Alumni were in Madison, 
and the natives were made to wonder who "Pike's 
Peak or Bust !" was. Among the number were 
Miss Elleda Vea, C. A. ex-'oi, Miss Whitehead, 
ex- '06, and her sister ; R. S. Butler, ex-'o4, Chase 
Kelley, ex-'o5, D. L. Schneider, ex-'o4, B. M. 
Rastall, '01, and L. R. Ingersoll, '02. 

B. M. Rastall and L. R. Ingersoll are doing in- 
structional work in the University of Wisconsin. 

Arthur Sobel, C. A. '02, is in New York City 
assisting in settlement and allied work. His 
health is greatly improved. 

Glenn Spurgeon, '00, who received the degree 
of M. D. at the Northwestern University Med- 
ical School last June, is at present serving as in- 
terne in the Chicago Lyingin Hospital and Dis- 
pensary. 

Edith Albert, '03, who is teaching in the Cen- 
tennial High School, Pueblo, was in the Springs 
Saturday for the Centennial-Springs game. 

Louise Steele, '01, is teaching Latin in the 
High School at Winterset, Iowa. 

Correction. — Abner Downey is in business in 

Telluride, but he is not Superintendent of 

Schools, as was stated in a previous edition of 

the Tiger. That position is held by Mr. L. D. 
Owens. 



TIGER NOTES. 



Twelve men have entered the Freshman- Soph- 



omore prize contest in declamation. The con- 
test is to be held December 14. 

Th preliminary for the Freshman-Sophomore 
speaking contest will be held Tuesday night in 
Perkins. Only judges will be present. Four 
men from each class will be selected. 

Heard at Freshman picnic — "Won't you call 
me John?" 

Miss Slidell of Pueblo spent Saturday with 
Miss Whiton. 

Misses Weaver and Whiton gave a spread Sat- 
urday evening. 

Ask Horn if he had any candy last Satur- 
day night. 

A meeting of the advanced students in Chem- 
istry was held Monday evening at the home of 
Prof. Crabtree to organize a club for original 
research along chemical and metallurigcal lines. 
Similar clubs at Boston School of Technology, 
Cornell, Columbia and Golden were discussed. 
After appointing a committee to draft a consti- 
tution the meeting adjourned to meet again Mon- 
day, November 28. Those present were Nead, 
Cox, Stewart, Hester, Horn and Finger. 

Let her Rip, Van Winkle. 

Denver met her Waterloo on Saturday. Re- 
venge is sweet. 

A large number of the students attended the 
Sousa concert on Monday night. 

The Seniors appear in lengthy and flowing 
robes. 

The finals in the Tennis Tournament will be 
played off this week. 

Now for Golden. 

The doubles in the Tennis Tournament will be 
started the first of the week. Watch for the en- 
tries. 

The Footlights Club is now in full swing in 
preparation for the Christmas trip, when "Rip 
Van Winkle" will be presented. 

Shaw telephoned to Fort Collins on Saturday 
evening. The bill has not been turned in as yet. 

The first rehearsal of "Rip Van Winkle" was 
held on Monday night. 



THE TIGHR 



Have you signed up for the Y. M. C. A. budget 
yet? If not, do it now. 



May Cathcart, '05, is in Garden City, Kan. ns, 
teaching in the High School. 



Another chance to do some good, hearty boost- 
ing. 



December 14th has been set aside as the date for 
the Minerva Function. 



The Freshman football team will be doing their 
little stunt before long. 

I guess we cannot have our numeral caps, 
unless — 

The unexpected has been happening all sea- 
son, so it's up to us to show the Miners. 

The Freshmen are still talking and thinking 
about the good time they had on their picnic. 

It's a nice stroll from Broadmoor to Colo- 
rado City. 

On account of the fact that basketball does 
not make the Association Treasurer look happy, 
there is likely to be no team this winter. 

Bell(e)s were in evidence at Saturday's game. 

The C. & S. is a good railroad (not). 

PrelimJnaries for Interstate Debate positively 
Monday, November 21. Come one, come all. 

There's nothing like getting on the good side 
of the football team. 

When called on in German B — I am the most 
unfortunate of men. 

Earl Howbert is laid up with a bad knee. 

The only time Boulder ever wanted us to win 
— next Saturday. 

Sporty ! Gee ! You ought to have seen that 
box part\ at the opera house Monday night. 

Two successive cuts in Analytics ! Alas, what 
.ire we ccming to? 

Mrs. F. C. Clerc of Denver has donated to the 
department of Mining and Metallurgy of Colo- 
rado College an exceedingly valuable set of fifty 
lantern slides, illustrating various processes in 
the metallurgy of iron and steel. These slides 
will be of great help in class room instruction. 

Miss Mayme Scott spent Saturday and Sun- 
day in Denver. 

Miss Mary Henry is a new -inmate of Ticknor. 



Rehearsals have begun or the Minerva farce 
to be given some time in the near future. 

A number of the students are planning to go 
home for Thanksgiving. 

About twenty of the Hall girls formed box 
parties at the theater Tuesday night to see Max- 
ine Elliot. 

Mrs. Burroughs and Miss Burroughs of Den- 
ver were the guests of Miss Crawford over Sun- 
day. 

Miss Jones was the guest of Miss West at the 
Phoedus Club Sunday. 

We are very glad to see Miss Whitehurst 
back in College again. 

Contemporary entertained the football teams 
most delightfully Thursday evening. Table foot- 
ball was the game of the evening an<f afforded 
much amusement to all. 

Ask Coach Juneau what he knows about "crepe 
de chine." 

The favorite slang expressions of the Mc- 
Gregor girls are "Oh pshaw" and "G'way." 

The P. B. T. badges are in evidence again. 

New tape has been laid on the west tennis 
court. 

Three matches of the Girls' Tennis Tournament 
have been played. 



Fat Lady — I'm going to ride on one of the 
donkeys, and will pay for you if you'd like to 
accompany me. 

Small Boy — Thankee, mum, but I'd rather sit 
here and laugh. — D. U. Clarion. 

The Professor — Humph ! Dear me ! I gave 
that young man two courses on the cultivation 
of the memory, and he's gone away and forgot 
to pay me, and I can't for the life of me remem- 
ber the fellow's name. How provoking! 

She — Isn't it strange? I can read your thoughts. 

He — Do they interest you? 

She — Yes, they are light reading. 



THE TIGER. 



SOCIETIES AND ASSOCIATIONS 



APOLLONIAN CLUB. 



Y. W. C. A. 



Result of Elections Darley 

"impressions of the Barbecue" Blunt 

"Our Next Governor" Smilie 

Piano Solo KauU 

"President Roosevelt" Redding 

Debate — "Resolved, That the policy of Gover- 
nor Adams as outlined by him would be 
better for the state than the policy pledged 
by Governor Peabody." 

Affirmative Randolph, Tyler 

Negative Lake, N. Vandemoer 

PEARSONS. 

Current Events Swing 

"The Barbecue" Boatright 

Debate — "Resolved, That England would be 
justified in going to war with Russia." 

Affirmative Angell, Bennett 

Negative C. Hall, Lamb 

Music Nash and Reyer 

Recitation Shaw 

Cutler Academy, 7 130 P. M. 

CONTEMPORARY. 

On last Thursday evening Contemporary en- 
tertained the football team in Ticknor Study. The 
company divided itself into Harvard and Yale 
supporters and then engaged in a strenuous 
game of egg football. Later the men were lined 
up on one side of the room and the girls on the 
other, and questions seemingly simple were put to 
each side. The girls were somewhat nonplussed 
when it came to the technicalities of football, 
while the men struggled valiantly with questions 
of feminine fashions. Relief came at last in the 
form of ices served in Contemporary colors. 
After sorne College songs the party adjourned. 

CONTEMPORARY. 

Program, November 18 : 

"Japanese Taste in Dress" Miss Simington 

Song Miss Whitehurst 

"The Japanese Court" Miss Carpenter 



HYPATIA. 



"Early Religions of Japan and Russia" 

Maude Stoddard 

"Influence of Christianity" , Bessie Gordon 

Music Quartette 

Extracts from Buddhist Sermons . . Alda Meyers 



Miss Ragan spoke on the "Needs of College 
Girls." She emphasized three particular needs, 
viz: purity of speech, self-forgetfulness, and gen- 
tleness. She spoke of the necessity of the "care 
of our conversation, to be in all things unselfish, 
and a special emphasis was put upon fault-finding 
and "knocking." 



TENNIS TOURNAMENT. 

The second round of the Tennis Tournament 
resulted as follows : 

Currier won from Blunt. 

Brehaut won from x\lden. 

Nash won from Moore. 

McLain won from Middlesworth. 

In the next round Currier won from Brehaut, 
and Nash won from McLain. 



BOWLING. 



The College team took three games from the 
Business Men by forfeit last Friday night. They 
then rolled a series with a picked team. The 
standing of the team in the league is: Won, 9; 
lost, 11; percentage, .450. Bernard has the high- 
est average, with West second. The score of 
the College boys against the picked team, follows : 

Tyler 188 165 170 523 

West 156 156 

James 112 171 283 

Moore 156 170 141 467 

Smith 203 165 141 509 

Bernard 207 156 128 481 



910 



768 



751 2429 



Walton (to fishmonger) — Just throw me half 
a dozen of those trout. 

Fishmonger — Throw them ? 

Walton — Yes ; then I can go home and tell 
my wife I caught 'em. I may be a poor fisher- 
man, but I am no liar. 



SAD FROST. 



The mighty men hailing from Boulder, 
Played Golden and thought they could hold her, 

But there came a sad frost, 

And the game it was lost, 
And now it is colder at Boulder. 

Dix. 



IC 



THE TIGBR 



ACADEMY DEPARTMENT 

Harle S. Alden Editor 

F . C. Merrill Athletic Editor 



CUTLER 6, CRIPPLE CREEK H. S. 6. 

The game Saturday was a decisive victory for 
Cutler Academy, but by the trickery of the of- 
ficials the game resulted in a tie. The ball 
was fairly over the C. C. H. S. goal line twice, 
but was taken back once for offside. The time 
keeper was also a little prejudiced, or so an at- 
tempt to shorten the time of the second half 
would lead one to believe. The team was run 
by Tuttle in the first half and by Allebrand in the 
last part of the second. Of course the boys were 
much handicapped by the altitude, and the con- 
dition of the field also caused no little trouble, 
a.5 it was mud and ice at one end and deep dust 
at the other. The tie will be played off Thanks- 
giving Day. 



C. H. S. 28, C. S. H. S. 15. 

The inevitable happened. Even the most con- 
ident High School men were unwilling to risk 
any money on the result. Centennial played a 
good game and with her greater weight she soon 
battered the High School to pieces. The locals 
never despaired once, but played on to the end 
and as gamely as at the start. Morrell's place 
kick was a very pretty piece of work as his op- 
ponents were almost upon him when it was done. 



LEARNED SOMETHING. 

"Have you any — aw — idea," inquired the tour- 
ist with the steamer cap, side whiskers, check 
suit, and gutteral voice, "what the circulation of 
the Daily Bread is?" 

"No," said the native, "but it's away up in the 
tens of thousands, and probably more." 

"Thanks. Will you — aw — please tell me what 
a 'cheap skate' is? The term is new to me, dont 
you know." 

"A cheap skate may be a tightwad, or a geezer 
that's merely on his uppers, but in either case 
eh's a — well, he's a cheap skate." 

"I am not sure that I quite comprehend you, 
but he is an objectionable person, is he not?" 

"Sure." 

"That was my inference. A lad accosted me on 
the street a few minutes ago and awsked me to 
buy a copy of the Daily Bread. 'No, my boy,' I 
said, 'I don't wish it.' 'Aw !' he said, 'your're a 
cheap skate !' So contemptuous was his tone that 
I felt compelled to buy his paper, though I had 
no use for it." 



(Subsequent entry in tourist's notebook: 
"American papers have enormous circulations, 
built up by an elaborate system of blackmail.") 



THE TEAM. 



At the close of the season for our school, at 
least, Cutler finds herself with a team that has 
had better luck losing than winning. This, on 
the surface, would appear a misfortune. 

When one goes in deeper — say below the sur- 
face of the football togs — one finds that Cutler 
has put out a fotball team, and for the first time 
in her history. With an eleven almost wholly 
composed of inexperienced players, with no coach, 
with indifferent support from student body and 
Faculty, with men considerably outweighed by 
their opponents, with an unfortunate schedule — 
and some other unfortunate things. Cutler finishes 
the season feeling she has nothing to be ashamed 
of. The team has been greatly handicapped by 
some of these things, has faced all of these dif- 
ficulties "boyfully," for our team was made up of 
boys, and has taken its medicine without com- 
plaint. Every man on the team, we feel con- 
vmced, has done his best for the team, has played 
ball as we wanted him to, "for all there was in 
it,' and whether we tell you so or not, we ap- 
preciate it and we are proud of you. Sir Football 
Knight, and we are only sorry we can't present 
you with something besides your "C" for what 
you've done for us. 

ACADEMY NOTES. 

Basketball practice will begin at once. 

The first round in the Tennis Tournament re- 
sulted as follows: Conklin defeated Harman, 
I'oling defeated Merrill, Bentley defeated Rich- 
ardson, Moore defeated Mitchell, Alden defeated 
Buchanan, Hutchinson defeated Johnson, Jack- 
son defeated Hoffman, Gile defeated Leslie, 
Jones defeated Hemming. 

Moore, Allebrand, Tuttle and Armstrong 
stayed in Cripple Creek over night. They re- 
port a fine trip down. 

If some patriotic student will only manufac- 
ture a yell or two for the Academy he will de- 
serve a "C" — whether he gets it or not. 

The "Kittens" were inclined to scratch now 
and then on election day. In fact there was 



\ 



THE TlGEk 



tt 



some of that on both sides. But Kittens will be 
Kittens, — until they grow up. 

"A dollar apiece for every man you put out 
of the game !" Evidently the C. S. H. S. athletic 
fund is in a flourishing condition. 

The Beta Sigma Phi girls really deserve a 
medal. 

Later entries in the Tennis Tournament are 
Gile, Leslie, Johnson, Jones and Hemming. 

The Faculty picknicked in the canons Sat- 
ui day. 

Haight certainly does get on with the girls. 

Hesperian did not meet Friday night. 

Walter thinks the girls in Cripple Creek are 
all right. 

Mitchell entertained several of the fellows at 
a fudge party Friday night. 

Mr. Fitch deserves to be made an honorary 
member of the football team. He has accom- 
panished it on all of its trips and is one of its 
most hearty supporters. 



THE THREE AUTOCRATS. 

Who puts the hose right in the path 
And gives us all an unsought bath, 
And makes us swear in stifled wrath? 
'Tis Jackson. 

Who is it when the day is chill, 
And winds are blowing raw and shrill, 
Will let the furnace fire be nil? 
'Tis Baylis. 



AMONG THE MISSING! 

They were found the next day ! Look any- 
where about the campus, on wheels, striding 
madly along the path towards the classroom, 
walking demurely and hastening primly, they 
went to and fro ; but the faces that the day 
before were upturned expectantly, hoping to see 
them, today were downcast, with averted eyes. 
The much-desired presence of yesterday had be- 
come the ever-present presence of today. It was 
a case of supply and no demand, while on that 
fatal day there was, alas ! demand and no supply. 

To the more discerning there would seem to be 
but one remedy for this state of affairs, viz: to 
shift some of the supply to the place where there 
is demand, and, in turn, some of the demand to 



the supply side of the scales. 

On Tuesday, when the team played its most 
critical home game, with the possible exception 
oi one or two members, not one of the Faculty 
could be found on the field. We do not know- 
how long it takes to vote, but it seems to be 
generally regarded as a matter which can be at- 
tended to in a few minutes. Be that as it may, 
we are assured that on next election day there 
will be a voting machine in use, and then we 
shall expect to see every member of the Faculty 
on the football field, armed with a tin horn and 
a banner. On Saturdays they are always there 
—of course ! 



The latest books to arrive in the Library, from 

the estate of the late Professor William M. Hall 

by H. C. Hall, Esq., of this city, in the Depart- 
ment of Economics : 

Marshall's Principles of Economics. 

W. G. Sumner's The Financier and the Finances 
of the American Revolution ; two volumes. 

1894 Report of the National Conference for 
Good City Government. 

A Book t>f Laws Relating to Loans, Currency, etc. 

Sixth Annual Report of the Interstate Commerce 
Commission. 

The 1892 Report of the Comptroller of the Cur- 
rency. 

Green's History of the English People; in four 
volumes. 

Constitutions of most of the States. 

Many numbers of Annals of the American Acad- 
emy. 

1 he Quarterly Journal of Economics. 

Political Science Quarterly. 

Many numbers of the Publications of the Amer- 
ican Economic Association, etc., etc. 
There have also been added to the Department 

of History and Economics through Prof. Urdahl's 

efforts some very valuable works in German : 

Ranke's History of the World, in nine volumes, 
covering the Medaeval Period. 

Kuglie's History of the Crusades. 

Dahn's Earlier History of the German and Ro- 
mance Peoples ; in four volumes. 

Prutz's Political History of the Western Lands 
in the Middle Ages; in two volumes. 

Hertzberg's History of the Reigns of the Roman 
Emperors. 
History of the Byzantine and Oriental Empires. 

MuUer's Islam in the Eastern and Western Lands. 

Grieger's Renaissance and the Humanities. 

Ruge's History of the Age of Discovery. 

Schiemann's Russia, Poland and Finland. 



EXCHANGES. 
Miss Shart — Have you been through algebra? 
Willie Chumply — Yes, but it was in the night 
and I didn't see much of the place. 



r^ 



The tighr 



EXCHANGES 



Mother— I gave you a shilling to be good yes- Students, if in need of glasses or repairs on 

terday, and today you are trying to show how ^^^^^ ^^^ ^^j^^^, ^^^ ^^^.^^^ j^^^j^^^ ^^^ ^^^^^^ 
bad you can be. 

Willy — Yes; but I'm just trying to show you 
that you got your money's worth yesterday. 



established in the county. You will find every- 
thins' right. 



CHARLES P. BENNETT 

Real Estate, Loans 
and Insurance*^ ^ 

NO. 5 PIKE'S PEAK AVENUE 



ElectroJhermatoriuin Bath Parlors 

124 South Tejon Street 

Hot Air, Electric and Turkish Baths, Electric 

Light, Salt Glow and Packs. 

COLLINS & CO., Props. 



Bookkeeping 

Shorthand 

Typewriting 



CENTRAL 



^. 



usiness 



Colleffi 



College Estab- 
lished in 
Denver in (887 



L. A. ARNOLD, Pres. J. C. CROY, Prin. 

Nichols Block, 18 and 20 S. Tejon St., 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Rooms inviting, Work Thorough, Teachers up-to-date 



Call or Write for Information. 



HE COLOHftOO aoAD. 




If ^oti Want 

The "Be^t, 

The QuicHjS'St, 
The Mo^i 

Sa-ti>sfciciory 

Line to Denver or Pueblo buy a Colo- 
rado & Southern Ticket. Get them at 
City Office, i 5 N. Tejon. 

J. H. SPRINGER, Commercial Agent. 
Come in and ask questions. 



THE TIGER 



ts 



WHEN IN NEED OF CLOTHING, HATS 
OR rURNISHINGS 

We would suggest that you consult your 

professor as to the best place io go. 

We are willing to abide by their 

judgement as they all trade 

with us. We give spe- 

ial discount to students 

The B. W. DAVIS ClOTHING & FUR- 
NISHING CO., 102 N. Tejon St. 



THE CRESCENT 

BOWLING ALLEYS 

115-117 North Cascade Ave. 

Telephone Main 863 



Private Alleys for Ladies 
Eight Alle3^s on one Floor 
Special Rates to Parties and Clubs 



2)r, To. bowler, 

DENTIST 

IS South uey'on St. 



G. W. Fault, B. S., D. O. Mrs. Lona E. Pauly, B. S. D. O. 
Graduates of A. T. Still's College of Osteopathy, 

Kirksville,Mo, 

DR. & MRS. PAULY, ?rvl?&%T 

Office, rooms 303-301 DeGraff Bl-lg, 118 N. Tejon St., Colo- 
rado Springs, Colo. PhMiies -Office h'ed 1272; Res. Ked323 
Hours 8 to 12 a. m., 1 to 5 p. m. 



F. H. WEEKS 

26 East Bijoti St* 

Artistic Portraits and 

all kinds of Photo- 

grapic Work 

Special Rates to Students 



XiZKi 



You are next to a good hair cut or shave when you patronize 



The Manhattan Barber Shop, J. R. WEYIMAR, Prop. 3o e. bijou 



WHITAKER & GARDNER 


..Jbr^lAUNDRv 


30 N, TEJON ST. 

Headquarters for 


^^j^A^U-^^^^ 


eolleqe Shoes 

OF EVKRY DESCRIPTION 

We have the best mining and civil engineering boot 
in the market 

WHITAKER & GARDNER 


THE STAR is the leader for prompt 
and satisfactory service. 

SPECIAL RATES to students of col- 
lege and academy 

S. E. BENNETT, College Ag't. 


'Bhe Best Yet 


w. I. Lceas 


COLLEGE PILLOW TOPS shows ever, 
important College Building. Souvenir of 


Columbia, Hartford, Rambler, Ideal & Tribune Bicycles 

The only first-class re air shop in town. Chainless wheels 
a specialty. Wheels for rent. Phone 517- i 1 29 N. Tejon 


College Days, 

Ashford & Roberts^ P^^- 

Tejon St. 

15 per cent discount to students on framing 


Broken hearts Can be Mended (Rivited or Ce= 

mcnted) By taking them to the hospital for repair- 
ing Cut Glass and China. MARIE R. FORBUSH, Art 
Studio, 108 N. Tejon. 



When in doubt, take the safe side. Send bundles to the 
Est.2oyrs 6olorado springs Laundry - ralph rice, conege Agt 



THE TIGER. 



Colorado College 



THE OLDEST INSTITUTION FOR 
HIGHER EDUCATION IN THE WEST 



FOUNDED AT COLORADO 
SPRINGS IN 1874 



Colorado College now offers advantages of the same 
grade as the best institutions. 

For information concerning Courses of Study, Rooms 
and Board, Physical Culture, etc., apply to 

WM. F. SLOCUM, President, 
or EDWARD S. PARSONS, Dean. 

For information in regard to the College Department of 
Music, inquire of 

EDWARD S. PARSONS, Dean. 

Those wishing information as to the Courses in Drawing, 
Painting, Designing, etc., etc., inquire of 

EDWARD S. PARSONS, Dean. 

For information concerning the Engineering Depart- 
ment, apply to 

FLORIAN CAJORI, 
Dean of Engineering School. 



Cutler Academy 



Cutler Academy is the Associated Prepartory School of 
Colorado College, in which students are prepared for any 
American College. Address, 

M. C. GILE, Principal. 



THE TIGER 



J5 



The Albert Sechrist Manufacturing Co. 

WILL INSTALL GAS and 



1033 16th 
Street 




ELECTRIC FIXTURES 

in your residence at Colorado Springs 
same price as Denver, without extra 
charge. Call and select your fixtures^ 
or will send you a catalogue. 



DENVtR, 
COLO. 




The Williafflson=Haffner 
Engraving Company 



1633 Arapahoe Street 



DENVER 



The 50-mile-an-hour Wheel 

Reading Standard Bicycles 



SaEFF & RIGGS; 



opposite Plaza Hotel 



u^erkins Crockert/ Co. 

r. A. PERKINS, Manager 

J20 9f. "Gejon St. 

yi XVagon Load of ^ "^ 

New Wood Type 

Atxci OtHcf Ms^tefis^ls 

Of the -Very L.alC'St at 
your Dispoj^cl _for 

Wirvdow Ca^rds 
Tickets. Flyers £££ 

E jsr G 'RA \^ I JSf G — U he rine^i 

The Telegraph Job Rooms 119 e. P.P.Ave. 

Ask wKere TKe Tiger is Printed 



USE THE 
Colorado Midland 



;^w^ 



ROUTE 




in Going to 

Utah, 

California 

and the 

West 



Best Line to Colorado Po'nts 

T%>o trains daily Den'ver to 
Salt Lake City 



C. H. SPEERS, 

G. P. A. 



H. C. BUSH 

Traffic Mgr . 

R. T. DUN A WAY, C. P. A 
Colorado Springs. 



The ©Id 

6urio Store 

Wholesale and Retail 
Dealers in 

GENUINE INDIAN GOODS AND 
CURIOSITIES 

J. S. CANDELARIO, Prop., 

301 and 303 San Francisco Street, 

SANTA FE, N. M. 



NEW EMPIRE THEATRE 3 shows Daily ^ l Matinee 3 P. M. 

Evenings 7:30 and 8:45 



10C 



VAUDEVILLE— IOC 



i6 



THE TIGER. 



El Paso Cleaning & Tailoring Co. Pressing 

III E. Kiowa St. Phone Main 667=A Colo. Springs Cleaning 



Dyeing 
Repairing 



Altering 
Tailoring 



Prof. Chas. J- Haysdorf 

TE4CHER OF MANDOLIN, bUITAR AND BANJO 

Music furnished for weddings, receptions, 

entertainments, etc. 

21 North Tejon. 



Office Phone 509-B 



Residence Phone Red S7I 



DR. HARRY L. MOREHOUSE 



DENTIST 



Hours 9-12, 1:30-5 



First N-it'l Bank BIdg., room 8 



C. F. Arcularius & Co. 
3eweler$ 

Diamonds and Watches 

Fine Jewelry Manufacturing 

9 South Tejon St. Coiorado Springs 

The 

Cfissey & Fowler Lumber 

Company 

Phone 101 117 to 123 West Vermijo Ave. 

Phone 540 

Monarch Hand 
Laundry 

421 S. Tejon 

KARL L. MOHLER, Prop. 
W. J. WALLRICH, College Agt. 

WE LaUIMDER AIVYTHING 

FINE CHOCOLATE BON BONS 

Name on every Piece 

Ice Cream, Hot and Cold 

Sodas 

Fresh Candies made exery hour 

UNION ICE AND COAL COMPANY 

W. M. BANNING, Prop. 




Coalt mood and Tee 

Dealers in ail kinds of Coal and Artificial and 
Natural Ice 

Yard Office, 105 W. Vermijo Ave. City Office, 5 N. Tejon 




JOHN MOFFAT 

Tine Caiforing 

Repairing, Cleaning, Pressing. Special rates to 
College Students 

Over Walling's Book Store 16 South Tejon St. 



Carriages, Cabs, 

'Busses, Baggage and 

Transfer Wagons 

©ffice, 15 North Cascade 



Denver Law School 

Law Department of the 
University of Denver 

Three years' course leading to the degree of 
Bachelor of Laws. Courses in Mining and Irri- 
gation Law. Full resident faculty. For informa- 
tion address 

LUCIUS W. HOYT, Dean 

Ernest & Cranmer BIdg., Denver, Colo. 

Did You Know 

That our stock of package crackers is so 
great in its variety that you could have a 
change for every day for more than two 
months and yet not exhaust our list? Well, 
it's a fact. We have a kind for every pos- 
sible time and occasion — and they are all 
good. Finest bakery goods in the city. 
Fancy Groceries 

W. N. BURGESS, 112 N. Tejon St. 

Titsworth & Davidson 
DAIRY 

2 MILES S. E. or COLORADO SPRINGS. P. 0. BOX 6 

The Houck-Davidson Coal and Transfer Co. 

Dealers In 

CANON CITY, MAITLAND 

AND LIGNITE COAL 

Phone 473-B. Office US N. Tejon. P. O. Box 275 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 




4i4»4»4**l'«l**i*'f>*i'4»«i*<i*4*4**i**i*4'«i>4**i*«i'«l'«l>4»4*4*4>4*4'«i*<i>*i'<i>4'*i**i'4'<i>4»4*4*<i*4>«i>4><i' 

4» _ ♦ 

4* 
4* 
4* 
4* 
4* 



'She Gowdy-Simmons Printing Company 

FOR WINDOW CARDS, TICKETS, ETC. ENGRAVED 
CARDS AND INVITATIONS ON SHORT NOTICE 



2/ Tforth 
Tjey'on tSV. 



COTRELL & LEONARD, 

ALBANY. N^ Y. 

Makers of CAPS and GOWNS 

to American Colleges and 
Universities 



THE DERN TEA AND COFEEE €©• 4. 



Dealers in TEAS, COFFEES, SPICES, 
EXTRACTS, BAKING POWDERS, Etc. 



Phone 575 



29 S. Tejon St. ^ 



The People's Grocei^y and Market 



PHONE MAIN 868 




222 EAST PIKE'S PEAK 



S JAMES & SON, Props, 



Colorado Springs, Colorado * 



ST, JOHN & BARNES 

Oldest and largest plumbing and heating 

establishment in city. Your 

patronage solicited 



Telephone 13 



206 N. Tejon St. 



Phone Main 151 



Established 1897 



D. W. SMITH 

FAMILY GROCER, TEA AND 
COFFEE MERCHANT . : : : : 
Orders Called for and Promptly Delivered 

731 N. Weber St. Colorado Springs, Colo. 

We a.re Sole Agents 

for tKe geiwiirve 

"PICTOD"MAITUNDCOAL 

Try it for your raivge SLiid furaaLCe 

The Colorado Springs 

Fuel Co. 1 12 Pike's Peak Av. 

TELEPHONES 230, 213 



For goodness $ake^<^ 

Use TUDOR lower vein Coal 
It beats all other Lignite 

TUDOR COAL COMPANY, Cor. Cascade and Cucharas 

cAsk your dealer for 

VICTOR 

Athletic 
Supplies 

THE SCOTT SIPPLY and 
TOOL COMPANY 





1725-31 Blake St. Denver, Colo. 



USE ELECTRIC LIGHT 
IN YOUR HOMES 



***************** 



The Colorado Springs Electric Co. 



•!• 4» 4» 4» ♦ * 4» 4»4» 4»4i4»4»**«fr4»4'4» 






4* 
4* 

4* 

4* 
4* 
4* 
4* 
4* 
4* 
4* 
♦ 
♦ 
4* 
4* 
4* 
♦ 
4* 

♦ 
4* 
4* 



♦ ♦4»4*4i4*4*4*4»4i4>4»4»4*4i4i4>4*4>4i4*4i4i4i4»4»4'4*4*4*4i4r4>4i«4>4*4i4»4>4>4»4i4* 

The Yo\itig Men^s Store* 

F'ai.sKionLai.ble Suits 

F'or Yovt\^ Men 

HERB YOU CAN SUB BVBRY NEW "FAD" 

IN YOUNG MEN'S WEARING APPAREL. ^ 

OUR "HARVARD" AND "UNIVERSITY" X . 

STYLES IN SACK SUITS ARE PARTICU- ^ 

LARLY SUITED FOR COLLEGE WEAR, 

P5.00, $18.00 AND $20.00. 



SPECIAL DISCOUNT 
TQ ALL STUDENTS 



HOLBROOK & PERKINS 



THE DENVER FIRE CLAY CO. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 
AND DEALERS IN 



4^ 
♦ 
4» 

♦ 
4> 
4» 

4» 

4» 
4^ 



X Chemical and Physicial Apparatus and Chemicals 



4* 
4* 

4" 
4* 

% 1742-1746 Champa Street, 

* 

4» 
4* 
4* 

4* 
4^ 

♦ 



A FULL LINE OF UBORATORY SUPPLIES AND ASSAY GOODS 
Write for Illustrated Catalogues 



DENVER, COLORADO 



i^ 



a^ 



Photographs 



at BINGHAM & WOOD'S. 18 S. Tefon 



4^ 
4i^ 

4^ 

4» 
♦ 
4>* 

4^ 
4^ 
4^ 

4^ 
♦ 



♦ ♦ 



4* H. C. COLBURN, Pres. 



E. A. COLBURN, Jr., Scc'y and Treas, 



The ^yintler4: ^^utomobile Co. 

LIVERY. STORAGE. REPAIRING 

Telephone Main 122 S-IO JS[, /fe-Oada At^e. Colorado J^pring^, Colo, 




O. E. HEMENWAY 

Groceries and Meats 



115 South Tcjon St 
Colorado Springs, Colorado 




,4*4>4>4i4'4p«»4>4f4>f4i4»4»4*4*4*4'4i4>4i4i4>4*4'4'4>4'4'4»4'4*4»4'4>«4i«4>4>4>«4' 




1 



Special Rates to Students 

On Rented Pianos 




The KNIGHT -eaMPBELL 
Music Company 



New Lennox Block 



Opposite North Park 



St. John Bros.r"'"'-'""'"' 

Gas and Steam Fitters 

Hot Water Heating a Specialty 

Prompt attention given to Repair Work. 



♦Curtis CBoal Co. 



Office 132 N. Tei'on St. Telephone 91. 

Try ''NE'.V RANGE" for the Kitchen, $400. 
BITUMNOUS COAL AT STANDARD PRICES. 

SELDOMRIDGE BROTHERS, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

Fiour, Feed, Grain, Hay and Seeds 

108 South Tejon Street 

Kepairing while You Wait Satisfaction Guaranteed 

A complete plant of New Machinery for 
the Manufacture of Fine Boots and Shoes 

* The Lightning Shoe Shop 

BROWN & COMPANY 
We make a specialty of Shoes to Measure and Shoes for 
Cripples. 28H North Tejon St. Colorado Springs 



Visiting Cards in latest Styles. 

WE SHOW 



YOU. 



By advertising in THE TIGER tliat we 
appreciate your custom. 

22 E. Kiowa St. The Prompt Printerj 
The 



Hassell Iron Works Co. 



Founders and Machinists 



♦♦♦*♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 



CKristnvdLS 
Photos 



Artistic in Posing, 
Lighting and Finish 

Discount to Students 




''^"^ : 



Phone 679-a 
Corner Cascade and Kiowa 



COLLEGE GOWNS, CAPS 

The Best Workmanship 
at Lowest Prices 




Sillc Faculty Gowns and Hoods 

COX SQNS & VINING 

262 Fourth Avenue., NEW YORK 



Fe©T BALLS 

Pants, Nose Guards, 
Tennis Goods 
and Sweaters 



at Strangs 

119 North Tefon Street 



Mueth's 

Soda, Ice eream 

eATERING 

CHAS. T. FERTIG 

9^ea/ Estate, Loans and Insurance 

29 N. Tejon Street 

TJhe Colorado Spr/n^s floral Co* 

FLORISTS 



yO'^ y^oriJk 77«/om Strmaf 



DOVGI^AS (Sl HCTHSRINGTON 

Architect 4: 

Phone 556-B Rooms 15-16 Outwest Building, Colorado Springs, Colo. 

♦ 4>4*4*4'4»4>«i'4>4'4*<l»4*«i*4*4>«»4>4>4*4»«i»«i>4>4>«i*4>4»4»4»4*4*«i>4*4><i»4>««<i*4>«4>4*4> 



THE TIGBR. 



Student's Book Store Books stationery; an Engi- 

___^..^.^.^^_^....,....^_ neer s Supplies; College Pins 
and Watch Fobs. Century Fountain Pens $1 to $4, Waterman's $2.50 

^"^ "*"• REYER & PUTT. 

Eor $1.00 per month ' ^"'* Sponged and Pressed each week 

— ^ — PANTATORIIM. 

17 East Bijou, Branch Office opp. Plaza Hotel. 



THE COLORADO SPRINGS CO. 

The Original Locators of 

Colorado Springs and 7?/anitou 

is still offering for sale choice 
lots on North Weber Street 
and North Wahsatch Avenue 

Also lots for sale in other parts of Colorado Springs 
and in Manitou 

Apply at ROOMS, OUTWEST BUILDING 



LOUIS ST©eK 



steam Dye and Cleaning 
Works 



Office and Works, 115 N. Tejon St. 
TELEPHONE 517-B 

Cleaning, Dyeing, Scouring in all its branches 
Ostrich Plumes Cleaned, Dyed and Curled 
Kid Gloves Dyed and Cleaned. 



GIDDINGS BROS. 

Fine Dress Goods and Ladies' 
TAILOR SUITS, Ladies' 
Furnishings 



Kiowa and Tejon Streets. 



ZEHNER JEWELRY CO. 

26 P. P. Ave. 

STUDENTS — Our Holiday Goods are arriving 
daily. Call and see them. 



D. E. MONROE & CO. 
Prescription Drugaist 

The best of Drugs, Stationery and Toilet Articles 

NO LIQUORS SOLD. 
C;or. Tefon Sf Bijou Pbotie 311 9( 331 

THE HEFLEY-ARCUURIUS DRUG CO. 
Druggists 

Kodaks, Cameras and all kinds of Photographic 
Supplies. Developing and Printing for Amatuers. 
Free Delivery. 
Phone 144 21 South Tejon Street 



liardivare 



fl. S. BLHKE 



Bicycles 



New Chainless Bicycle $35 and $20 
Rambler, Orient and National Automobiles 



Best Kepair Shop in city 



107 n. €eion 



I11r$. Y)^ R. Crooks 

Coilet Parlors at 20 6ast Kiowa 

Also Room 52, Antlers Hotel 

No Apprentices. Only experienced help employed. 

A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 

Largest Manufacturers in the World of Official 
Athletic Supplies 

The football supplies manufactured by A. G. SPALD- 
ING & BROS, are the best that can absolutely be produc- 
ed ; they are of superior make; they have stood the test fo • 
over twenty-eight years, and are used by all intercollegiate, 
interscholastic and prominent football teams o the 
country. 

SPALDING'S OFFICIAL FOOTBALL GUIDE. Edited 
by Walter Camp. Contains the NEW RULES for 1904. 
Price, 10 cents. 

SPALDING'S HOW TO PLAY FOOT BALL . Edi ed by 

Walter Camp. Newly revised for 1904. Pri e 10 cents. 
"If it pertains toathletics, we make it. " 

A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 

New York, Chicago, Denver San Francisco, St. Louis 

Send for a co y of Spalding's Fall and Winter 

Sports Catalogue. It's Free. 

HENRY TAMM 

Druggist 

PRESCRIPTIONS 
TOILET ARTICLES 
STATIONERY 

All Popular Drinks Served 
at our Soda Fountain 

Plaza Hotel, Cor. Cache la Poudre & Tejon Sts. 

THE RUGBY=PRmROSE COAL CO. 

HII Kinds of Fuel 

Phone 481-A West 44-A 21 N. TEJON ST. 



H.KRAWZ 



peRCEuaiN 
H. KRHNZ & 



Only 8 Chair Barber Shop in the City 

lObH B. Pike*9 Peak Ave. 



BATH TUBS f. R. SMITH 

e©., Barbers 

Try the I lectric Vibrassage Machine 
eGLORADO SPRINGS. GGLG. 



THE TIGER. 



FITS 



CORRECTLY 



COPTBIGHTED. 

It Saves You Money and Time 

When I examine your eyes or fit your glasses. My NEW 
METHOD is perfection beyond a doubt. Consultation 
Free. DR. SCHADT, O. D. 

Eyesight Specialist. 
Office 303 (Colorado BIdg., cor. Tejon and Hnerfano 

Use Gas 



We sell a GOOD FOUNTAIN PEN for Ji 

WHITNEY & GRIMWOOD 

Opera House Building 

We are agents for WATERMAN'S IDEAL FOUNTAIN 
Pens. Prices from $2.50 up. 



Watchmaker and Jeweler 

15 South TJejon cJV. 




AND 



lOOOWORTH 



A 



^tMcol'-''^; 



1739 Champa St., DENVER, COLO. 



C. W. WARSOP & CO.. 



205 M. 1 ejon Sf. 



Draperies, Upholstery Goods, Furniture. Complete line of Screens, 
Pillows, Pillow Tops, Couch Covers, etc. 



The 



Denver 






Denver 



FRANK F. CRIMP 

FLORIST 

Phone 500 5og E. Columbia St. 

Special attention given to Telephone Orders 



H. E. BOATRIGHT 

Public SienoyrapAer 

33 GID DINGS BLDG. 
Rates dc per 100 words, 50c per hr. extra carbons 5c r er page 



The epx Shoe eo. 

107 S. Tejon St. Colorado Springs, Colo. 
J. M. eox 



LADIES, MISSES AND CHILD- 
REN'S SHOES 

MEN'S, YOUTHS' AND BOYS' 
SHOES 



FRANK H. SMALL watches, Diamonds, fine Watch Work. Special 
Jeweler^nd SiTversmith ^'^''^e to Students. 113 Pike's Peak Ave. 



Vol. VII. 



nhe TIGGR 



COLORADO COLLEGE, NOVEMBER 23, 1904. 



No. II 




^ ^ f4F4F04 f ^ f 4f4f^F0^f4f^ 



ATHLETIC 
DEPARTMENT 

C. C. 4— S. S. M. 4 



On Franklin Field at Golden last Saturday the 
Tigers playea Golden to a standstill in the final 
game of the Tigers' championship schedule. It 
was a spectacular, hard-fought contest in which 
every play known on the Colorado gridiron was 
used. The Miners expected to win the game by 
a large score, but there was great delight in the 
Miners' camp when Sill kicked a goal and thereby 
saved his heretofore invincibles from defeat. 
There is only one word that will express the 
Miners' success on the gridiron this year, and 
that, word is hick. A team never played in better 
luck than did the Miners in the Boulder and Col- 
orado College games. 

Every man on the College team played the game 
for all he was worth. Never before this season 
did the team play so well as a unit, both on of- 
fense and defense, and although the game was 
tied by Golden in the last half minute of play 
after a disastrous fumble by the Col- 
lege, Golden was clearly outplayed. Nead 
cutpunted the mighty Sill, Bale simply toyed 
with big Emmons, Vandemoer and Hedblom kept 
Captain Kreuger and Keene guessing all the time, 
and Fawcett made it necessary for big Bosquett to 
go to the sidelines, and on the ends Captain Len- 
nox and little Fisher soon proved to the con- 
querors of Boulder that they had better try 
somewhere else. Scibird replaced Gibbs at full- 
back after the latter hurt his knee. Hill played 
his best game of the year, but still showed a 
tendency to fumble. Morgan did some great line- 
smashing and was clearly the best halfback on the 
field. But Nead played the greatest game of the 
twenty-eight warriors that were playing their 
best. He was strong on defense and a wizard 
at smashing the line when given the ball. His 
greatest feat of the day was the way he out- 



puted Sill, the much-tooted Miner halfback. 

Lennox won the toss and Sill kicked off to 
Morgan on the 5-yard line. Morgan returned the 
ball 20 yards, but in interfering for him Randolph 
had his knee twisted and had to leave the game. 
By steady line plunges the ball was carried to 
the 50-yard line, where Nead smashed through 
tackle for 13 yards. The Miners held on the 
35-yard line and got the ball on downs. By 
line bucks the ball was carried to midfield, where 
Sill was forced to punt. But the College fumbled, 
and it was the Miners' ball on the College 15-yard 
line. Steady line smashes carried the ball to the 
2-yard line, where the Tiger line was like a stOne 
wall. It was a critical moment. The backs were 
lined up behind their own line. The ball was 
given to Morgan, and he fought and was dragged 
8 yards. Another first down was made and the 
College was penalized 5 yards for offside. Nead 
punted to the College 45-yard line. The Miners 
returned the ball 15 yards, but lost it on downs. 
Nead punted into Miners' territory and a Tiger 
fell on the ball. They could not make their 
distance and Nead punted to the Miners' 15-yard 
line. The Tigers put up a wonderful defense, and 
on the third down the Miners had not gained a 
foot. "Sill punted 20 yards, and the Tigers ham- 
mered the line for 15, when the ball was lost on 
downs. Sill tried a punt, but Bale tossed Emmons 
and fell on the ball. A steady advance was be- 
gun that had all the earmarks of a touchdown, 
but on the play that rushed the ball to the goal 
line, Thompson, although he was the only one that 
saw it, said that Hill was holding, and penalized 
the Tigers ten yards. Little Billy Johnston fell 
on his knee, smoothed the ground and opened his 
hands. Bale made a beautiful pass, the line held 
like a stone wall and with unerring accuracy 



THB TIGER 



Lennox's boot drove the leather squarely between 
the posts. The goal scored 4 points, but the Tigers 
earned and should have had a touchdown, for 
nobody saw Hill holding, and he declares that he 
did not. The decision cost Colorado the game. 

The teams exchanged goals, and Nead kicked to 
Brill on the goal line. Bill returned 20 yards, 
and Sill punted to the 50-yard line and the College 
had returned 7 yards when the whistle bJe.w, 
putting an end to the first half. Score, C. C. 4, 
S. S. M. o. 

Nead opened the second half by kicking to the 
goal line. Brill returned the ball 20 yards. 
Hughes went through guard for 15 yards, and 
made eight around left end. Sill slid around 
right end for 5. Brill and Morrison made some 
good gains, but the College took the ball on downs 
on their own 45-yard line, but the Miners hel3 
and Nead punted 40 yards. Brill fumbled. After 
two downs Lennox tried a place kick from the 
40-yar(I line, but the ball fell short, and Sill got 
i^ on the Miners' 5-yard line. Brill, Hughes and 
Kreuger made good gains, but on an attempted 
quarter-back run Hoyt lost 2 yards. Sill punted 
15 yards. In three downs the College lost 5 
^--^rds. Sill's punt was blocked and recovered by 
Nead. After gaining 7 yards, the College punted 
to the 15-yard line, and Sill returned 10 yards 
and punted 55 yards to Morgan. Nead punted 
to the Miners' 45-yard line to Elsworth, wlfom 
Lennox downed the instant that the ball struck 
the little quarter. By hard bucking the Miners 
carried the ball to the College 30-yard line only 
tc lose the ball on Brill's fumble, and Morgan got 
il. The College made first down and Nead 
punted to Ellsworth on the Miners' 50-yard line. 
The Miners carried the ball back to where it was 
punted from, and the Tigers took it on downs, 
when Ellsworth tried his quarterback run. Mor- 
gan plowed through tackle for 5 yards, but Hill 
fumbled. The Miners made 5 yards, and with the 
ball on the 30- yard line, the nearest it had been 
to the Tigers' goal during the second half, Sill fell 
back, Ellsworth held the ball, and the foot that 
beat Boulder kicked the goal that tied the score. 
Just 30 seconds were left. Sill kicked off and 
the whistle blew. Score, C. C. 4, S. S. M., 4. 

LINEUP. 

School of Mines. Colorado College. 

Van Wagener, L. E R. E., L. Lennox (c) 

Kreuger (c), L. T R. T., Vandemoer 

Keene, L. G R. G., Hedblom 

Emmons-Chapman, C C, Bale 

Bosquett-Crane, R. G L. G., Fawcett 

Morrison, R. T L. T., Nead 

Finnigan, R. E L- E., FisHer 

Hoyt-Ellsworth, Q. B. .. Q. B. Randolph-Johnston 

Hughes, L. H. B L- H. B., Hill 

Sill, R. H. B R. H. B., Morgan 

Brill, F. B F. B., Gibbs-Scibird 



Summary — Referee, Risley, Colgate ; umpire, 
Thompson, Princeton ; headlinesman, Hawley, 
C. A. C; linesmen Hill (S. S. M.) and Vande- 
moer (C. C.) ; timekeepers, McCart (S. S. M.) 
and Rice (C. C) ; goals from field: Lennox, Sill; 
time of halves, 30 minutes. 



THE INSIGNIA PARTY. 

The Seniors and Juniors buried the hatchet 
forever at the Insignia party last Wednesday 
night. The remembrance of the bygone strife 
and bloodshed, of posters and green paint, only 
served to add to the briorhtness of the future 
liarmony and peace. The program for the 

eveninsf consisted of a spiritualistic seance. Pres- 
ident Hall of the Senior Class acted as medium. 
Soon after the curtain rose, he besran to hit the 
nipe and to disnlav a slight tendencv to see 
thines. However, he confessed that he would 
not be comnletelv under the hvnnotic spell till 
af<-er the "circle" has snne a selection. The mass- 
ive frame of Mr. Waslev recalled in a striking 
manner the ghosts of the football p-iants who 
hnve succumbed to Boulder in the last four years. 
The trials and tribulations of Freshman math- 
ematics bore down upon Senior and Junior alike, 
as the spirit of Dr. Cajori incorporated in Mr. 
Willett paced to and fro before their eyes. 
Miss Fezer and Miss Ingersoll. renresenting the 
shades of Psvchology and Philosonhy. warned 
the Junior of future troubles. Mr. Crothers' 
burlesque depiction of the Faculty was a good 
takeoff on that dignified assembly. A few of 
the Juniors came in ;for their share of the 
"roasts" at this point in the program. The cli- 
max was reached in the medium's trasric repre- 
sentation of the darkest crime in our College 
history. The vivid description of the scene, 
from the victim's first unavailing effort to the 
last despairing sob of his fair protector, struck 
terror to the hearts of all present. The "spirit" 
of the stage by Miss Churchill was a fitting cap 
to the climax. The "heavy" acting of the Col- 
lege Minstrel Show, of the Girls' Glee Club Op- 
era, and of "Trelawney of the Wells" was re- 
viewed. Mention of the Apollonian High Class 
Vaudeville also incidentally recalled "The Critic." 
Miss Stiles in the role of a Sophomore, and Miss 
Rudd as a Freshman brought back the class con- 
tests of two years ago. At the close of the pro- 
gram, Mr. Givens, as chosen representative of 
the Juniors, presented the Seniors with the pic- 
tures of President Slocum, this being a time- 
honored custom, symbolic of the binding to- 
gether of the two classes. Mr. Hall responded 
for the Seniors. Refreshments were then sewed 
and the two classes proceeded to bury the hatchet 
in a literal as well as a figurative sense. After 
the Virginia reel the party broke up. 



The tiger. 



THE INSIGNIA ADDRESS. 

President Slocum's address was devoted to 
what might be called "The Significance of In- 
signia Day." His remarks were as follows : 

Today there is a tendency in the United States 
to exalt the American college — the institution 
that stands for undergraduate work. We are 
beginning to emphasize the value of the intellec- 
tual life, and of training the mind. Men are 
beginning to look with favor upon education for 
its own sake. The belief that the mind in itself 
is something worth developing is becoming- 
more and more extended. It is this idea that the 
college, as distinguished from the university, 
stands for. In our own Insignia Day we are 
emphasizing the life of Colorado College. Oth- 
erwise this day means very little to us. Colo- 
rado College believes in the college idea — the 
idea of the value of intellectual training. So, if 
the intellectual life is worth while, if is worth 
while to dignify it here in Colorado College to- 
day. Our Insignia Day throws this dignity into 
prominence, and brings the present Senior Class 
into a more pronounced place of leadership. So 
you, the members of the Senior Class, remember 
your place of leadership, and dignify it. Be 
ready for the best intellectual life of your last 
days in Colorado College. Make the most of 
them. Say and show that Colorado College 
stands for the best — the best, morally and in- 
tellectually. 

So, we gather together today to say to our- 
selves that it is our aim and goal to be true to 
our best and noblest selves, and to Colorado Col- 
lege. 



THE ETHICAE ADDRESS. 

The subject of President Slocum's address last 
Friday morning was "The Relation of Thought- 
fulness to Thankfulness." He said in sub- 
stance : 

There is a theory that one who thinks cor- 
rectly can not be wrong — that correct thinking 
compels correct actions. And this theory is par- 
tially true. It is true in the sense that the 
person who is thoughtful becomes thankful. An 
ungrateful person is' not often a thinking person. 
That person in whose life thought plays a very 
great part is never guilty of ingratitude — the un- 
kindest of misdeeds. This idea ought to come 
especially near to us at this time. As Thanks- 
giving approaches we become more realistic of 
the power of thought over thankfulness. The 
millionaire who can not think grateful thoughts 
is a wretched crceature in the world. The op- 
portunity that comes to one in College is espe- 
cially adapted to show us the power of thought- 
fulness, and to thank God for our opportunity. 



Every person here this morning ought to stop 
?nd say: God has helped me to think beautiful 
thoughts. I ought to be thankful for the life of 
thoughtfulness." When we stop and think ol our 
advantages here in America, we can't help being 
thankful. Thanksgiving must teach us, as stu- 
dents, the greatness of the Creator. As students 
wc ought to stop and think the greatest of all 
li-.oughts — the thought of God. 



FABLE. 



There was once a Young Man, who grew ex- 
ceedingly Flush and took a Young Lady to the 
Theater. Moreover, they sat in a Box. 

Now the Girl was not Dumb, but knew how 
to Speak, yet through the evening she said not 
one word. And the Young Man grew Wroth, 
and said to himself, "She does not Enjoy this. 
I will never bring her again, and will tell all my 
friends here and At Home what a Fool this 
Girl is." 

Soon after this he learned that the Girl had 
been told that it was Bad Form to talk to a 
Young Man at the Tneater, and he Exclaimed, 
"What a touching example of Obedience to the 
Laws of Etiquette. Let her keep up her Obedi- 
ence, and my Friends and I will take Girls who 
Enjoy the Play." 

The Moral of the Tale is, that Virtue is its 
own Reward. '07. 



HURRAH FOR US! 

F course the wonderful improvement in the 
playing of the Tigers was caused principally, 
a^ least, by the self-confidence (not over-confi- 
dence) gained by the victory of a week previous. 
Then, too, the other schools of the state were 
t?king our editorial of a week ago seriously to 
heart, and it lost them a good deal of their nerve. 
But, seriously, the playing of the team deserves 
the most hearty commendation. Such playing 
as that during the rest of the year can not fail 
to bring to Colorado College come championships 
before Commencement, 1905. It is to be regrefted 
that the rally did not take place earlier in the 
season, but we can not help that now. Our busT-^ 
ness now is to see to it that no such slumps oc- 
cur again. 



Bobby (at the breakfast table)— Maud, did Mr. 
Jules take any of the umbrellas or hats from 
the hall last night? 

Maud — Why, of course not! Why should he? 

Bobby — That's just what I'd like to know. I 
though he did, because I heard him say when he 
was going out: T'm going to steal just one,' 
and — why, what's the matter, Maud? 



i, 



The tiger. 



THE TIOE R. 

Published weekly during the College year by 
The; Tiger Publishing Co., in the interest of Colo- 
rado College. 

J. Y. Crothers Editor-in-Chief 

T. Hunter Assistant Editor-in-Chief 

J. I. Muffley Athletic Editor 

Miriam Carpenter Literary Editor 

Mabel Barbee Alumni Editor 

A. H. Fisher Local Editor 

Bert Wasley Business Manager 

C. A. Hedblom Assistant Business Manager 

CORRESPONDENTS : 

Mr. Nash, Miss McDowell, Miss Isham, Miss 
Kidder, Mr. Lamb, Mr. Reeks, Miss Arbuckle. 

Subscription, $1.25 per year, payable in advance. 
Single copy, 5 cents. 

The Tiger is forwarded to all subscribers until 
ordered discontinued and all arrcaranges are paid. 

Students, Professors and Alumni are invited 
to contribute literary articles, personals and items. 
Contributions must be accompanied by the writer's 
name. 

Address all communications to The Tiger, 
Colorado College, Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Entered at the Postoffice at Colorado Springs, 
Colo., as second-class matter. 



Patronize Tiger Advertisers 



EDITORIAL 



RIP VAN WINKLE. 

TTHE Footlights Club is something new in Colo- 
rado and will be welcomed by the people of 
the state as the old Glee Club would not be. 
Owing to the difficulty of getting anyone to 
manage the Glee Club, it was decided to dis- 
pense with the organization this year. The stu- 
dents felt, however, that it would be improper 
for Colorado College not to be represented on tne 
boards this year, so began to look about. They 
found an opera which had been given by men last 
year and had been a great success in the Springs. 
Why not put on "Rip Van Winkle," and make 
the annual trip over the state? The idea was 
pleasing, so a stock company was formed, and 
the whole state is to be granted the privilege of 
seeing "Rip." The present production is said 
to rival even that of Joe Jefferson himself. Some 
of the best of lasts year's caste is still with the 
company, while vacant positions have been filled 
with the best talent in the College. Rehearsals 



have been in progress for some time, so that the 
people may be promised more than their money's 
worth if they see "Rip" on his tour during Christ- 
mas holidays. 



NO MORE DEBT. 

T^HE most, encouraging event in the past few 
years in the athletics of Colorado College 
is the entire liquidation of the debt that has been 
such a handicap to the Athletic Association, and 
the provision that no such debt shall ever again 
be contracted by that Association. Henceforth, as 
there will be no interest or old principal to 
pay off, much better equipment can be afforded 
our athletic teams. That this is very necessary 
is shown by the fact that we have had no training- 
table this season, and in consequence the players 
have not been in as good condition as they might 
have been. Not the least important feature of 
the situation is that, since the students have 
raised this money, the President can tell his 
friends what good people we are, and they will 
give him his long talked of million. 



M EXT week's Tiger will contain the history of 
the football season of 1904, with additional 
athletic matter of importance. 



\A/E reprint part of the "Three Autocrats," be- 
cause they look so well together, and one 
was omitted by mistake. 



\A/HY not get your copy in this early every 
week? It would clear the atmosphere of 
the printer's office considerably. 



In order to avoid errors, it is requested that all 
information concerning Alumni be sent directly 
to the Editor or Alumni Editor of the TigER. 
We cannot keep track of our Alumni without 'the 
aid of the Alumni themselves, and if they don't 
send articles, any item of interest concerning 
them, given on good authority, is very apt to be 
printed. Aeumni Editor. 



In November a Turkey lived in a dell — 
But he wanted to live in December as well. 
So he said to himself, "I will not touch a bite 
Till safely I've lasted through Thanksgiving night. 

So he went without eating till he was so thin 
Even Job's turkey failed in comparing with him. 
Thus he he lived through Thanksgiving without 

any warning. 
But died of starvation at 5 the next morning. 

P. B., '08. 



THE TIGER. 



ALUMNI NOTES. 

Miss Loomis talked very interestingly to the 
Minerva Alumnae last week. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lester McLean are expected in 
Colorado Springs the 13th and 14th of next month. 

D. G. Rice, ex-'o;, was a visitor at the Col- 
lege last week. 

Cards have been received announcing the 

wedding of Dr. William F. Spaulding, '99, and 

Miss Gertrude Caswell of Greeley, which oc- 
curred November 22 in Omaha, Neb. 

Rev. John Newell, '00, is assistant pastor of the 
House of Hope Presbyterian Church at St. Paul, 
Minn. The pastor is Dr. Boyle, formerly of this 
city, whom many former students will remember. 

Ella Warner, '04, is attending Leland Stanford 
this year. 

Mr. Bent, '03, is principal of the schools at 
Castle Rock. 



TIGER NOTES. 

Miss Floss Churchill entertained the Minerva 
Society at an informal tea Saturday afternoon. 

The Freshman girls at McGregor, because they 
were not allowed to meet the returning football 
tarn, had a spread and jubilee by themselves. 

Mrs. Davie entertains Minerva at a dance at 
her home Friday night. 



The Sophomore-Freshman, football game 'is 
now a certainty. The officers for the Sophs are 
Lcuchtenberg, Captain; McClintock, Manager; 
tor the Freshmen, Neal Vandemoer, Captain, 
and McCreery, Manager. 

Prexy returned from Denver with the team. 

A number of rooters went to Golden. 

Cheer up, Boulder. The worst is yet to come. 

We couldn't stand more than one of those ath- 
letic meetings a yea^. 

"Trainer" Chapman accompanied the team to 
Golden. 

Don't be too long in giving thanks, for beware 
the double cuts. 

Several of the Tiger correspondents are hereby 
notified that they have over-cut. 

Prof. Pattison — If you stop to think of it, you 
can see that you don't know anything. 

Prof. Ahlers to Lamb — Did you have help on 
this? 

Lamb — Not so that you could notice it. 

The Minerva farce has been postponed indefi- 
nitely. 

Dr. Cajori's definition of Algebra : The science 
in which you do not know anything, but just as- 
sume a quantity and then look wise. 



MINERVA CANDY SALE. 



The Senior Class reports a fine time at the 
canon Wednesday afternoon. 

Miss Harrington expects to visit here Thanks- 
giving time. 

Miss Mary McCreery will spend Thanksgiving 
Day with Miss Crawford in Denver. 

The Campus girls are planning a sheet and pil- 
low case dance for Thursday night. 

There was skating in Palmer Park last week. 

We've the put the Miners on the bum, that's 
what we've done ! 

The team left for Salt Lake City Tuesday night. 

The Freshmen are planning another party. 



On December loth will occur one of the big- 
gest affairs of the year — a Candy Sale managed 
by the Minerva girls. Everyone knows the push 
and zeal with which Minerva goes into things, 
and this next undertaking will undoubtedly be 
as successful as all former ones. Her purpose 
this time is not to raise money for the Clubhouse, 
but to help pay the enormous debt of the Ath- 
letic Association. A down town building has 
been secured for the occasion, and altogether 
the event promises to be an interesting one. 
Don't fail to leave the date open, December to, 
1004, Minei'va Candy Sale. 



INTERSTATE PRELIMINARIES. 

The long-looked-for event occurred Monday 
night, when the preliminaries for the debate with 
Utah was held. The debaters chosen were V. E. 
Keyes, President of the Apollonian Club; M. C. 



B 



THE TIGER. 



Hall, President of Pearsons Literary Society, and 
R. L. Givens, President of the Oratorical Asso- 
ciation. The judges of the debate were Dr. Ca- 
jori. Dr. Urdahl, Prof. Noyes. The debaters are 
to choose the sides of the question, "Resolved, 
That the closed shop system is beneficial to 
American industry." As each of them debated 
the negative, it is presumed they will choose that 
side. The logical, impressive delivery of all three 
men augurs well for us in the debate, which oc- 
curs here some time between April 15 and May 15. 



Nead was by far the strongest player of the 
College team. He shot through the Miners' line 
time and again when gains were needed in order 
tc keep the ball. He punted strongly through the 
whole game and was eVerywhere on defense, es- 
pecially just where he was needed. L. Lennox 
played as fine an end as has been seen on any 
Colorado field this year. He protected his part 
of the territory against end runs ; he tackled well, 
saved a couple of fumbles and kicked the field 
goal that was the only score for his school. 

Hill came nearer playing to his 1903 form than 
3' any previous time this year, spoiling a good 
afternoon's work by making a disastrous fumble. 
Morgan was strong at bucking the line, forcing 
his way ahead many feet after he had been 
slopped. — Denver Republican. 



room to decide on the amount to be pledged. 
Hypatia was the first to report, $50. Then fol- 
lowed Contemporary ($100), Apollonian ($100), 
the Faculty ($100), Minerva ($200). The Fresh- 
man Class then pledged $200; there was no back- 
ing down with them. The Juniors pledged $50, 
the Sophomores $100 and the Seniors $40. The 
Campus and the Gymnasium girls each pledged 
$10, the Y. W. C. A. and the Y. M. C. A. equal 
amounts. The Bookstore gave another $10. The 
Tiger and the Student Volunteers each $5. Kappa 
Sigma gave $50. 

The Footlights Club had already given a box 
at the home performance of "Rip Van Winkle," 
which the Association is at liberty to sell for what 
it can get. Meanwhile personal pledges had come 
in, raising the amount to $1,445. The two largest 
of these pledges were, President Slocum, $25, and 
Principal Richards, $15. This left $55, which the 
Alumni agreed to pay — and the debt was raised. 



At the National Council meeting at Des Moines 
a Colorado College reunion was held. Pres- 
ident Slocum, Dr. Bayley of Denver, Dr. Gregg 
of Colorado Springs, J. B. Kettle, '92, Dwight 
Bayley, '00, Thos. Dungan, '97, G. B. Hawkes, '98, 
and E. S. Parsons took dinner together. 



THE ATHLETIC DEBT RAISED. 



THE THREE AUTOCRATS. 



And we did it. 

Last Thursday the Chapel exercises were held 
at II 115. Afterwards there was a meeting of the 
Athletic Association, Prof. Ahlers presiding. 
Prof. Noyes, the Treasurer, read a report showing 
that the Association was nearly $1,500 in debt. 
Manager Hester spoke on how the debt occurred. 
Nearly two-thirds of the debt was left over from 
last year. The balance was caused largely by the 
fact that only one championship game could be 
secured here. While this one and the practice 
games more than cleared expenses, the profits 
were scarcely large enough to pay for the equip- 
ment necessary, even had no attempt been made 
tc pay the coach's salary. President Slocum spoke 
of the necessity of being honest as an Associa- 
tion and paying our just debts, even — if necessary 
— at the expense of our reputation in athletics. 

At the suggestion of the Chairman it was moved 
and carried that the books of the Association be 
balanced on February 15th of each year, and, un- 
less the Association is solvent at that time, that 
the College take no part in athleics until the debt 
is paid. 

The work of raising the debt was then under- 
taken. The Academy through its principal, Prof. 
Gile, pledged $300. Meanwhile the various Col- 
lege organiations gathered in various parts of the 



Who puts the hose right in the path. 
And gives us all an unsought bath. 
And makes us swear in stifled wrath? 
'Tis Jackson. 

Who is it when the day is chill. 
And winds are blowing raw and shrill 
Will let the furnace fire be nil? 
'Tis Baylis. 

Who is it rules with iron hand. 
And listens to each meek demand. 
And turns it down to beat the band? 
'Tis Baylis. 



Dix. 



Mrs. Johnsing — Dem's nice stockin's yo' have. 
Mis' Willums. Will dey wash? 

Mrs. Williams — How do ah know, woman; I'se 
done had 'em only fo' weeks. 

Father — I am sorry to have to whip you, for, 
as I have told you before, it hurts me a good 
deal more than it does you. 

Jerry — I know that, pa, and it's only because 
I know that it hurts you that I cry. 



THE TIGUR. 



SOCIETIES AND ASSOCIATIONS 



APOLLONIAN CLUB. 

Reading from Mark Twain Howell 

Recitation Treat 

Reading form Bill Nye West 

Recitation Bartlett 

Reading Hester 

Recitation Cox 

Controversy — "Is Coeducation in Colorado Col- 
lege a Success?" 

Affirmative A. B. Middlesworth 

Negative Hosteller 



PEARSONS. 



The program for November 25 will consist of 
the preliminaries for the intersociety debate. 
The final debate comes on Friday evening, Jan- 
uary 6, 1905. 



.CONTEMPORARY CLUB. 

There will be no meeting of Contemporary on 
November 25. The program for December 2 
will be : 

"The Awakening of Japan" Miss Smedley 

"Methods of War" Miss Fezer 



CONTEMPORARY GERMAN. 

The annual Contemporary German was given 
Saturday evening in Ticknor Study amid at- 
tractive decorations of red and white. The music, 
furnished by Pearsons orchestra, was exceptional- 
ly good. The favors were in the society colors, 
being Japanese fans, paper caps, tiny Contempo- 
rary flags, and red and white carnations. Some 
of the figures caused a good deal of laughter, 
which did away with any formality, and everyone 
was sorry to have the evening end. 



HYPATIA. 



For November 25, Miss Loomis will tell us of 
"Venice." Miss McDowell of Denver has con- 
sented to take the musical part of the program. 

Mrs. Urdahl will sing for the society. 

Y. W. C. A. 



The last meeting was led by the girls of the 
Students' Volunteer Band, who traced the rise 
of that organization from its first meeting in 
Williams College in 1887 down to the present 



(lay. They spoke of the need for missionaries in 
foreign countries, particularly in India, China 
and Africa, and showed by statistics the wonder- 
ful work that the Student Volunteers are doing 
all over the world. Steadfastness of purpose, 
earnestness and prayers best fit one for the of- 
fice of foreign missionary. 



Y. M. C. A. 



We had no speaker Sunday afternoon. After 
ireeting we adjourned and went to the city 
Y. M. C. A., where Miss Ben-Oliel .spoke. Mr. 
Day -will be the speaker next Sunday. 

On December 8-1 1, the nineteenth annual state 
convention of the Y. M. C. A. meets in Boulder. 
Some of the best speakers of the country will be 
present, which insures a helpful, interesting meet- 
ing. Each college of the state is expected to 
send at least ten delegates. The City and Railroad 
Associations join with the College Associations 
at this time. If it is possible for any member of 
the Associaton to attend, he should see Hedblom 
in time. Do it now. 



LOVE POEMS. 

Of all the girls I know 
Or e'er expect to meet. 

There's no one that I love so 
As you so true and sweet. 

Oh, for a smile, 

Oh. for a kiss ! 
You are my style, 
My bundle of bliss. 
Composed by Ivory Small James, 
by *James and *Buchanan. 

*The above are deeply in love. 



rV/'W 






->^ 






Arranged 



Prisoner — I'd prefer shootin' to hangin'. Judge. 

Judge Lynch — Well, most of us w^ould rather 
see a hangin', so we'll string you up first and 
shoot afterward ; that w^ill make it satisfactory 
all 'round. 



Myrtle — Mr. Readymoney told me at the party 
last night that my face was a poem. 

Rose — How mean of him to refer to the lines. 



Farmer Jones — How's yer son Rube gittin' 
along at college, Hiram? 

Hiram Perkins — Pretty well, I reckon. The 



THE TlGEk. 



ACADEMY DEPARTMENT 

Earle S. Alden Editor 

P . C. Merrill Athletic Editor 



HESPERIAN. 

The program last Frmay night was in many 
respects somewhat unsatisfactory, though Gile's 
first appearance showed that he is going to be 
heard from in Hesperian. His speech was on 
Current Events. The debate on the subject, 
"Resolved, That the sympathies of the United 
States should be with Japan in the Russo-Japan- 
ese war ," was won by the affirmative, this side 
being represented by Wilfley and Walter, while 
Conklin and Hoover were on the negative. The 
debate, on the whole, showed indifferent prepara- 
tion, though Walter's debate was good. His 
presence on the stage is improved, his delivery 
was spirited, and he presented his arguments dis- 
tinctly and with force. It is "material' like 
this that will make a debating team. Conklin's 
argument was good, but he was more or less in- 
coherent. He lacks fluency. Wilfley appeared 
ill debate for the second time and showed marked 
improvement. Hoover's refutation was well at- 
tempted and aimed at a vital spot, but his conclu- 
sions were unconvincing. Alden's recitation was 
a failure through lack of preparation. He had 
selected one of Keats' poems. If recitations are 
to be attempted we must have more time given 
to preparing them. 

Steffa of the Apollonian Club acted as critic. 
His remarks were apt and to the point. Fisk, 
also of the Apollonian, was a visitor and said 
some very pleasant things about the society in 
bygone years. 

The program for next Friday is posted. Vis- 
itors are cordially invited to be present. 



ACADEMY NOTES. 

Gregg, Hemming and Gile were treated to 
a free bath last week. They report the water 
fine. Gregg was prevented from making his 
escape only by a slight oversight on his part — he 
forgot his clothes. 

Allie — Heterogeneous means some kind of 
monster. 

Upper Classman, translating — Out of his head, 
he siezed arms 



Humorous Teacher — That was a handy place 
Xo keep them, wasn't it ? 



In the Girls' Tennis Tournament Miss Masi 
won from Miss Currier and Miss Gile last week. 
In the Boys' Tournament Conklin defeated 
Poling, Moore defeated Bentley, Jackson defeat- 
ed Gile, Mclntyre defeated Jones. In the third 
round Moore defeated Conklin, this being the only 
game played, so far, in this round. 

Maguire, Mitchell, Conklin, Jackson and Alden 
enjoyed a moolight tramp and a campfire sup- 
per Saturday night. 

Hoover is spending Thanksgiving at home. 

Hubbard, C. A. ex-'o4, is a Freshman at Golden 
this year. 

See Dickerman about cross-country running. 

R. Gile — We have only twelve in our class — 
and three girls. 

Tuttle and Lincoln report that they are nearly 
sold out. 

Miss McLaughlin and Miss Lester are new 
girls in Class I. 

Kurie is walking on two feet again. We are 
glad to see it. 

Buchanan was confined to his room Monday on 
account of illness. 



BASKETBALL. 



The number of fellows coming out to practice 
is steadily increasing, and with the help of Mc- 
Creery and French we ought to turn out a fine 
team. Captain Dickerman is showing up in his 
eld time form at center and is the only regular 
man at that position. Buchanan and Hoffman 
are trying for forward, and as both have had 
some experience they ought to make good. Bent- 
ley and Allebrand .are candidates for guard a'hd 
are showing up well. Moses is arranging for a 
trip to Greeley, Eaton and that section, besiSes 
five games with the Pueblo Y. M. C. A. All 
fellows who can should come out, as we need 
their help in practice. Besides being the best of 
exercise for the winter months, basketball is 
really a scientific game and requires no little 
skill of its followers. If you have never played, 
come down to the gymnasium some night and 



THB TlGHtt. 



XI 



practice with us, and you will be well on your 
way toward becoming an expert basketball 
player. Practice every night in the Gym at 7:15- 



CROSS-COUNTRY RUNNING. 

This very delightful and very beneficial sport 
can be indulged in nowhere to better advantage 
than in Colorado Springs, where the weather is 
almost always propitious and the country ad- 
mirably adapted to running. It is proposed to 
get up a club to engage in these runs during the 
fall and winter, and surely such a club should 
meet with the most enthusiastic support of the 
boys of the Academy. At first the runs will be 
short, and no one need hesitate to join them be- 
cause he fears he will not be able to keep up. 

Cross-country running is somewhat of an in- 
novation in C. A., but would be the best of train- 
ing for basketball, track and baseball, and it is 
to be hoped that our athletes will not overlook 
its value in this respect, while for the men whose 
tastes are less strenuous the running will fill a 
"long-felt want." 



WHAT YOU CAN DO. 

Of course, I don't know what it is you ought 
to do. I know it is something, and if you are too 
modest to tell me, why it's my misfortune and 
your fault. You know what I mean? Oh, about 
the Tiger, and something you have to fill it 
up on. You can't expect the TigeR to stay with 
you unless you give it something now and then. 
It belongs to the cat family, you know, and the 
first thing you know it will be curling up beside 
someone else's kitchen fire, and you won't have 
any little striped kitty any more. 

In plain words, I don't want any half-starved 
cat on my hands. You must help me take care 
if it. I want a lot of material on file all the 
tmie, so that I can arrange for a certain amount 
of space each week a,nd then always fill that 
space. 

Literary articles, verses, jokes, news items 
and suggestions of every sort will receive care- 
ful consideration. While you are in the Acad- 
emy is the time to try your hand at this sort of 
thing. I know that almost everyone can (\o 
something worth while for the Tiger. Tell 
me what you can do ! 



EXCHANGES. 

"Help, help !" cried the man who was being 
robbed. 

"Calm yourself," said the highwayman; "I 
don't need any assistance." 

"Your wife is something of a socialist, isn't 
she?" 



"I should say so," annswered Mr. Meekton, 
absentmindedly. "Our church never thinks of 
giving a social unless she runs it. — Washington 
Star. 

"And do you expect to follow in the footsteps 
of your father when you grow up?" asked the 
good man. 

"Naw," replied Tommy; "me fader is de leg- 
less wonder in de museum." — Chicago Record- 
Herald. 

Dr. Quackley— Ah, um, you say the medicine 
I prescribed hasn't stopped the chills ! Did you 
sliake well before taking? 

Dummager — Yes, and afterwards, too. — Life. 

"I think I'll learn bookkeeping," he said. 

"Oh !" replied the man who had lent him one 
six months before, "you needn't waste any time 
doing that." — Chicago Record-Herald. 

Godfrey — I am sorry to hear that Squallop is in 
a bad way financically. What is the cause of it? 

Scorjel — As nearly as I can learn, he has been 
trying to maintain an automobile position in 
society on a bicycle income. — Chicago Tribune. 

Billy — Where are you goin', Johnny? 
Johnny — Ain't goin' anywhere. 
Billy — But you must be going somezvhere. 
Johnny — Naw I ain't. I'm comin' back. 

Old Lady — You don't chew tobacco, do you, 
little boy? 

Newsboy — No, 'm ; but I kin give yer a cigar- 
ette. 

Ikey — Give me a penny, fadder, and I buy me 
an orange of dat man outside. 

Heimstadter — Go and make faces at him, Ikey, 
ina3^be he will throw one at you. 

A policeman swore to an affidavit as follows: 
"The prisoner sat upon me, calling me an ass, a 
precious dolt, a scarecrow, a ragamuffin, and an 
idiot, all of which I certify is true." 

Mrs. Youngwed — Do you know, dear, that I 
think the baby sometimes cries in his sleep? 

Mr. Youngwed (savagely) — I don't know about 
that, but I know he often cries in mine. 

She — True happiness is found in pursuing a 
thing — not in catching it. 

He — If you had ever pursued the last car any 
you wouldn't say that. — Chicago Journal. 



fHB TIGBR. 



EXCHANGES 



"I'm glad I learned to sew on buttons when 
[ was a bachelor/' observed Peckem. 

"Why, Henry?" asked Mrs. Peckem. 

"Because," he answered, "I find the accom- 
plishment so useful, now that I am married." — 



Students, if in need of glasses or repairs on 
same, see Ashby, the Optical Jeweler, the oldest 
established in the county. You will find every- 
thing right. 



CHARLES P. BENNETT 

Real Estate, Loans 
and Insurance.^ ^ 

NO. 5 PIKE'S PEAK AVENUE 



ElectroJhermatoriuni Bath Parlors 

124 South Tejon Street 



Hot Air, Electric and Turkish Baths, 
Light, Salt Glow and Packs. 
COLLINS & CO., Props. 



Electric 



Bookkeeping 

Shorthand 

Typewriting 



CENTRAL 



^. 



usiness 



College 



College Estab- 
lished in 
Denver in 1887 



L. A. ARNOLD, Pres. J. C. CROY, Prin. 

Nichols Block, 18 and 20 S. Tejon St., 
Colorado Springs, Coio. 

Rooms inviting, Work Thorough, Teachers up-to-date 

Call or Write for Information. 



THE COLORADO ROAO. 




'""'xooASouwt'^* 



If you Want 

The "Be^t, 

The QtiicHssi, 
The Mo^t 

Satisfactory 

Line to Denver or Pueblo buy a Colo- 
rado & Southern Ticket, Get them at 
City Office, i <, N. Tejon. 



J. H. SPRINGER, Commercial Agent. 
Come in and ask questions. 



THH TIGER 



IS 



WHEN IN NEED OE CLOTHING, HATS 
OR FURNISHINGS 

We would suggest that you consult your 

professor as to the best place lo go. 

We are willing to abide by their 

judgement as they all trade 

with us. We give spe- 

ial discount to students 

The B. W. DAVIS ClOTHING & FUR- 
NISHING CO., 102 N. Tejon St. 



THE CRESCENT 

BOWLING ALLEYS 

115-117 North Cascade Ave. 

Telephone Main 863 



Private Alleys for Ladies 
Eight Alleys on one Floor 
Special Rates to Parties and Clubs 



2)r. 2^. ^owhrf 

DENTIST 



IS South TJejon St. 



G. W. Pauly, B. S., D. O. Mrs. Lona E. Pauly, B. S. D. O. 

Graduates of A. T. Still's College of Osteopathy, 

Kirksville, Mo. 

DR. & MRS. PAULY, T^fg^H^i'' 

Office, rooms 303-301 DeGraff BMg. 118 N. Tejon St., Colo- 
rado Springs, Colo. Ph nes -Office l\ed 1272; Res. Ked323 
Hours 8 to 12 a . m . , 1 to 5 p . m. 



F. H. Weeks 



26 East Bijou St* 



Photographs taken any hour 
of the day or evening by 
flashlight. Especially suit- 
able for groups. Call and see 
samples. 

Special Rates t3 Sti\dei\ts 



next 



You are next to a good hair cut or shave when you patronize 



The Manhattan Barber Shop, J. R. WEYMAR, Prop. 3o e. bijou 



WHITAKER & GARDNER 

30 N. TEJON ST. 

Headquarters for 

e oHege Shoes 

OF EVERY DESCRIPTION 

We have the best mining and civil engineering boot 
in the m irket 

WHITAKER & GARDNER 



#^ 



/iUNDg^Y 



THE STAR is the leader for prompt 
and satisfactory service. 

SPECIAL RATES to students of col- 
lege and academy 

S. E. BENNETT, College Ag't. 



15he Best Yet 

COLLEGE PILLOW TOPS shows ever, 
important College Building. Souvenir of 
College Days. 

Ashford & Roberts^ .'26 n 

Tejon St, 

15 per cent discount to students on framing 



w. I. Lueas 



Columbia, Hartford, Rambler, Ideal & Tribune Bicycles 

The O' ly first-class re air shop in town. Chainless wheels 
a specialty. Wheels for rent. Phone 517- V I29N. Tejon 

Broken hearts Can be Mended (Rivited or Ce= 

niented) By taking them to the hospital for repair- 
ing Cut Glass and China. MARIE R. FORBISH, Art 
Studio, iOS N. Tejon. 



When in doubt, take the safe side. Send bundles to the 
Est."yrs. 6oIorado SpHngs LdUHdry ralph rice. conege Agt. 



14 



THE TIGBR. 



Colorado College 



THE OLDEST INSTITUTION FOR 
HIGHER EDUCATION IN THE WEST 

FOUNDED AT COLORADO 
SPRINGS IN J874 



Colorado College now offers advantages of the same 
grade as the best institutions. 

' For information concerning Courses of Study, Rooms 
and Board, Physical Culture, etc., apply to 

WM. F. SLOCUM, President, 
or EDWARD S. PARSONS, Dean. 

For information in regard to the College Department of 
Music, inquire of 

EDWARD S. PARSONS, Dean. 

Those wishing information as to the Courses in Drawing, 
Painting, Designing, etc., etc., inquire of 

EDWARD S. PARSONS, Dean. 

For information concerning the Engineering Depart- 
ment, apply to 

FLORIAN CAJORI, 
Dean of Engineering School. 



Cutler Academy 



Cutler Academy is the Associated Prepartory School of 
Colorado College, in which students are prepared for any 
American College. Address, 

M. C. GILE, Principal. 



THE TIGER 



15 



The Albert Sechrist Manufacturing Co. 

WILL INSTALL GAS and 



1033 16th 
Street 




ELECTRIC FIXTURES 

in your residence at Colorado Springs 
same price as Denver, without extra 
charge. Call and select y( ur fixtures^ 
or will send you a catalogue. 




The Williafflson=Haffner 
Engraving Company 



1633 Arapahoe Street 



DENVER 



The 50-mile-an-hour Wheel 

Reading Standard Bicycles 



SiiEFF & RIGGS: 



Opposite Plaza Hotel 



Perkins Crockerj/ Co. 

r. A. PERKINS, Manager 

120 7f, Vejon St. 

^ XOcLgon Load of "^ ^ 

Ne^w Wood Type 

Q/" ihe -Very Latest at 
your Disposal _for 

Wiyvdow CoLrds 
Tickets, Flyers £££ 

E, JSf CRA V I jsr G — U he Finest 

The Telegraph Job Rooms use, p. p. Ave. 

Ask wKere TKe Tiger is Printed 



USE THE 
Colorado Midland 

in Going to 

Utah, 
California 
'^ andtiie 
West 

Best Line to Colorado Po nts 

TliJO trains daily Denver to 
Salt Lake City 

H. C BUSH C. H. SPEERS, 

Traffic Mgr. G. P. A. 

R. T. DUNAWAY, C. P. A. 
Colorado Springs. 




The ©Id 

eurio Store 

Wholesale and Retail 
Dealers in 

GENUINE INDIAN GOODS AND 
CURIOSITIES 

J. S. CANDELARIO, Prop., 

301 and 303 San Francisco Street, 

SANTA FE, N. M. 



NEW EMPIRE THEATRE 3 shows Daily -« 1 Matinee 3 P. M 

Evenings 7:30 and 8:45 



IOC 



VAUDEVILLE 



10C 



t6 



THB TIGBR 



El Paso Cleani ng & Tailoring Co. 

Ill E. Kiowa St7 Phone Main 667=A Colo. Springs 



Pressing Dyeing Alte ing 

Cleaning Repairing Tailoring 



Prof. Chas. J. Hausdorf 

TE4CHER OF MANDOLIN, bllTAR AND BANJO 

Music furnished for weddings, receptions, 

entertainments, etc. 

21 North Tejon. 



Office Phone 309-B 



Residence Phone Red 871 



DR. HARRY L. MOREHOUSE 



DENTIST 



Hours 9-12, 1:30-5 



First N t'l Bank BIdg., room 8 



C. F. Arcularius & Co, 
jewelers 

Diamonds and Watches 

Fine Jewelry Manufacturing 

9 South Tejon St. Colorado Springs 

^The 

Crissey & Fowler Lumber 
Company 

Phone 101 117 to 123 West Vermijo Ave. 

Phone 540 

Monarch Hand 
Laundry 

421 S. Tejon 

KARL L. MOHLER, Prop. 
W. J. W4LLRICH, College Agt. 

WE LaUIVDER aiVYTHIIVG 



FINE CHOCOLATE BON BONS 

Name on every Piece 

Ice Cream, Hot and Cold 

Sodas 

Fresh Candies made exery hour 




UNION ICE AND COAL COMPANY 

W. M. BANNING, Prop. 



Coal, lUocd and Tee 

Dealers in all kinds of Coal and Artificial and 
Natural Ice 

Yaid Office, 105 W. Vermijo Ave. City Office, 5 N. Tejon 




JOHIN MOFPAT 

fine Cailoring 

Repairing, Cleaning, Pressing. Special rates to 
College Students 

Over Walling's Book Store 16 South Tejon St. 



Carriages, Cabs, 

'Busses, Baggage and 

Transfer Wagons 

Office, 15 North Cascade 



Denver Law School 

Law Department of the 
University of Denver 

Three years' course leading to the degree of 
Bachelor of Laws. Courses in Mining and Irri- 
gation Law. Full resident faculty. For informa- 
tion address 

LICIUS W. HOYT, Dean 

Ernest & Cranmer BIdg., Denver, Colo. 

Did You Know 

That our stock of package crackers is so 
great in its variety that you could have a 
change for every day for more than two 
months and yet not exhaust our list? Well, 
it's a fact. We have a kind for every pos- 
sible time and occasion — and they are all 
good. Finest bakery goods in the city. 
Fancy Groceries 

W. N. BURGESS, 112 N. Tejon St. 

Titsworth & Davidson 
DAIRY 

2 MILES S. E. OF CQLORADO SPRINGS. P. 0. BOX 6 

The HottcbPavidson Coal and Transfer Co. 

Dealers In 

CANON CITY, MAITLAND 
AND LIGNITE COAL 

Phone 473-B. Office US N. Tejon. P. O. Box 257 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 



4>4i4*«|i4*4>4*4*4'4i4*4>4>4>4*4>4*«4>4*<i*4*<i>*i><i*«i»*i><i><i**|*4»*i*4*4**ii4»«i>*i*«i*4**i*4*«i**i>4'4> 

4^ Oee 



S6e Gowdy-SimmonLS Printing Company 

FOR WINDOW CARDS, TICKETS, ETC. ENGRAVED 
CARDS AND INVITATIONS ON SHORT NOTICE 



3/ Tforth 
TJejon <5V. 




COTRELL & LEONARD, 

ALBANY. N. Y. 

Makers of CAPS and GOWNS 

to American Colleges and 

Universities 



THE DERN TEA AND COFFEE CO. 



Dealers in TEAS, COFFEES, SPICES, 
EXTRACTS, BAKING POWDERS, Etc. 



Phone 575 



29 S. Tejon St. ^ 



The People's Qtoczty and Market 



PHONE MAIN 868 




* S. JAMES & SON, Props. 



222 EAST PIKE'S PEAK 



Colorado Springs, Colorado 



ST. JOHN & BARNES 

Oldest and largest plumbing and heating 

establishment in city. Your 

patronage solicited 



4* 
* 

4^ Telephone 13 



206 N. Tejon St. 



Phone Main 151 Established 1897 

p. W. 8MITH 

FAMILY GROCER, TEA AND 
COFFEE MERCHANT . : : : : 
Orders Called for and Promptly Delivered 

731 N. Weber St. Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Don't Kick 

if you are not satisfied |0 
with the way your coal 
man treats you. Come 
and see us. 

The Colorado Springs 

F\iel Co. **AtthesignoftheRedMea." 




For goodness Sake^^ 

Use TUDOR lower vein Coal 
It beats all other Lignite 

TUDOR COAL COIVIPANY, Cor. Cascade and Cucharas 

(Ask your dealer for 

VICTOR 

Athletic 
Supplies 

THE SCOTT SUPPLY and 
TOOL COMPANY 





1723-31 Blake St. Denver, Colo. 



USE ELECTRIC LIGHT 
IN YOUR HOMES 



The Colorado Springs Electric Co. 



♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦4><i>4>4>«l»4>4><i>4*4i4»*i*4»4*4i4>«4>4>4>4»4*4> 



♦ 4i 4i 4* 4* •!• 4* 4* ♦ 4> ♦ 






41 41 41 4» 4» 4» 4i 4* 



*^^^*A>***^<¥'h***^^*^4f ********* 



The Yoxinif Men^s Store* 



t 



* 
* 
* 
* 

* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 
* 

* 
* 

* 
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s 



iylisH Lton^ Coasts 



Especially stylish for College men. They are a fashion for comfort 
as well as style and altogether the most popular overcoat worn today. 
We have a large assortrnent of these at $13.50 to $25.00. 



SPECIAL DISCOUNT 
TO AL|,fpyD>l|^T^ 



HOLBROOK & PERKINS ( 



THE DENVER FIRE CLAY CO. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 
AND DEAURS IN 



I Chemical and Physicial Apparatus and Chemicals % 



* 
* 
* 
* 

X 1742-1746 Champa Street, 

* 

* 
* 
* 

* 
* 
* 
* 



4 F^L MNE OF UBORATORY SIPPLIES AND ASSAY GOQDS 
Write for Illustrated Catalogues 



DENVER, COLORADO * 



P" 



(jL^ Photographs 



at BINGHAM & WOOD'S. 18 S. Tefon t 



The ^niler^s ^titomobite Co, 



E. A» COLBURN, Jr., Sec V and Treas, ^ 

t 

t 



* H. C. COLBURN, Pfcs. 

X LIVERY. STORAGE. REPAIRING f 




j^ ,.j. i ti 



O. E. HEMENWAY 



Groceries and Meats 



115 South Tcjon St 
Colorado Springs^ Colorado 




******************************************** 



IH£ TIGCR 



Colorado College 



\ 



[GocWard. Mrs 
Ro8 N Cascade 




/ 



VOl^VJVJB V//. 



1st, 1904 

dumber 12. 



♦ ♦♦4*4'*i*4'«»«l*<i>4*4*4»4*4»*l*4>*i*4*4»4*4* 

Special Rates to Students 

On Rented Pianos 



The KNIGHT - eSMPBELL 
Music (Company 



4* 

*i* New Lennox Block 

♦ 

4* 
4* 

♦ 
4* 
4* 
♦ 
4> 
4* 
4> 
♦ 
4* 
4* 
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4* 




Opposite North Park 



St. John Bros.r''"^*^™"' 

Gas and Steam Fitters 

Hot Water Heating a Specialty 

Prompt attention given to Repair Work. 

gurtis (goal go. 

Office 132 N. Teion St. Telephone 91. 

Try "NEW RANGE" for the Kitchen, $4.00. 
BITUMNOUS COAL AT STANDARD PRICES. 



SELDOMRIDGE BROTHERS, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

Fiour, Feed, Grain, Hay and Seeds 

108 South Tejon Street 

Repairing while You Wait Satisfaction Guaranteed 

A complete plant of New Machinery for 
the Manufacture of Fine Boots and Shoes 

The Lightning Shoe Shop 

BROWN & COMPANY 
We make a specialty of Shoes to Measure and Shoes for 
Cripples. 2&Vi North Tejon St. Colorado Spein^gs 

Visiting Cards in latest Styles, 

WE SHOW gy advertising in THE TIGER that we 
iyU...«..t.... appreciate your custom. 

22 E. Kiowa St. The Pfompt Printery 



♦ 

4* 
4» 
4* 
4* 
4* 
4» 
4* 
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4* 
4* 
4* 
4» 
4* 
4* 

4* 

4* 

4* 

♦ 

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4* 
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4» 

4* 
4* 

* Phone 556-B 

♦ 4>«4> 



The 

Hassell Iron Works Co. 



Founders and Machinists 



4»4*4*4*4*4*4*4*4|;4*4>4*4*4*4»4>4'«4*«4>4> 

CKristm&s 

Pk/\i/\c^ Artistic in Posing, 
1 11UIU& Lighting and Finish 

Discount to Students 



7/UMt 




Phone 679-a 
Corner Cascade and Kiowa 



COLLEGE GOWNS, CAPS 

The Best Workmanship 
at Lowest Prices 

', Silk Faculty Gowns and Hoods 



COX SONS & VINING 

262 Fourth Avenue., NEW YORK 




F©0T BALLS 

PantSy Nose Guards, 
Tennis Goods 
and Sweaters 



at Strangs 

119 Xorth Tejon Street 



Mueth's 

Soda, Ice eream 

eATERING 

CHAS. T. FERTIG 

^ea/ Estate, Loans and Insurance 

29 N. Tejon Street 

TJhe Colorado Sprtnys <^iorat Co* 

FLORISTS 



•(^^ i^ofM TTayoM Strw&t 



4i 

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4* 
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4 

4> 
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4 
4 

4 
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4 
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4 
4 
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4 
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4 
4 
4 
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4 

4 
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» 



DOVGLrAs ^L he:the:r.ington 

Rooms 15-16 Outwest Building, Colorado Springs, Colo. 



THE TIGER 



Student's Book Store Books stationery; an Engi- 

^ neer s Supplies; College Pins 

and Watch Fobs. Century Fountain Pens $1 to $4, Waterman's $2.50 

^"^ ""• R EYER & PUTT. 

Eor $1 00 06r month ' ^"'^ Sponged and Pressed each week 

— ^ PANTATORIIM. 

17 East Bijou, Branch Office opp. Plaza Hotel. 



THE COLORADO SPRINGS CO. 

The Original Locators of 

Colorado Spr/n^s and 9/fanitou 

is still offering for sale choice 
lots on North Weber Street 
and North Wahsatch Avenue 

Also lots for sale in other parts of Colorado Springs 
and in Manitou 

Apply at ROOMS, OUTWEST BUILDING 



LOUIS STOCK steam OyeandCle.ning 

Office and Works, US N. Tejon St. 

TELEPHONE 517-B 

Cleaning, Dyeing, Sconring in all its branches 

Ostrich Plumes Cleaned, Dyed and Curled 

Kid Gloves Dyed and Cleaned. 



GIDDINGS BROS, 

Fine dress Goods and Ladies' 
Tailor Suits, Ladies' 
Furnishings 



Kiowa and Tejon Streets. 



]. B. CORRIN 



Cailor 



J03 E. Bijou St. COLORADO SPRINGS, COLO. 

D. E. MONROE & CO. 
Prescription Druggist 

The best of Drugs, Stationery and Toilet Articles 

NO LIQUORS SOLD. 
eor* Teiotf S( Bifou Phone 311 Sf 331 

THE HEFLEY-ARCILARIIS DRUG CO. 

Kodaks, Cameras and all kinds of Photographic 
Supplies. Developing and Printing for Amatuers. 
Free Delivery. 
Phone 144 21 South Tejon Street 



liardware Bicycles 

a. S. BLSKE 

New Chainiess Bicycle $35 and $20 
Rambler, Orient and National Automobiles 

Best Kepair Shop in city 107 n. Cefon 

f11r$. Y)^ K« Crooks 

Collet Parlors at 20 East Kiowa 

Also Room 52, Antlers Hotel 

No Apprentices. Only experienced help employed. 

A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 

Largest Manufacturers in the World of Official 
Athletic Supplies 

BASE BALL, BASKET BALL, GOLF, BOXING GLOVES, 
STRIKING B\GS, GYMNASIIJIVI GOODS. 

Spalding's Trade Mark goods are the acme of perfection ; 
accept no goods that are not the Spalding kind ; there is no 
substitute for a Spalding article. 

Every base ball manager should send at once for a copy 
of Spalding's Spring and Summer Ci-talogue. It's free. 

Spalding's Athletic Almanac for 1905. Price 10 Cts. 
per copy 

A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 

■*^ ew York, Chicago, Denper San Francisco, St. Louis 

HENRY TAMM 

Druggist 

PRESCRIPTIONS 
TOILET ARTICLES 
STATIONERY 

All Popular Drinks Served 
at our Soda Fountain 

Plaza Hotel, Cor. Cache la Poudre & Tejon Sts. 

THE RUGBMRIMROSE COAL CO. 

Ail Kinds of Fuei 

Phone 481-A West 44-A 21 N. TEJON ST. 



H.KRAWZ PORCELaiN 

H. KRANZ & 

Only 8 Chair Barber Shop in the City 

106'2 B. Pike's Peak Ave. 



F. R. SMITH 



BATH TUBS 

e©., Barbers 

Try the t lectric Vibrassage Vlachine 
eOLeRADO SPRINGS. GGLG. 



THB TIGER 



Fits 



CORRECTLY 



copyaioHTEo, 

It Saves You Money and Time 

When I examine your eyes or fit your glasses. My NEW 
METHOD is perfection beyond a doubt. Consultation 
Free. DR. SCHADT, O. D. 

Eyesight Specialist. 
Office 303 Colorado Bldg., cor. Tejon and Huerfano 

Use Gas 



We sell a GOOD FOUNTAIN PEN forji 

WHITNEY & GRIMWOOD 

Opera House Building 

We are agents for WATERMAN'S IDEAL FOUNTAIN 
PENS. Prices from $2.50 up. 



J^red S. Jraj/ner 

Watchmaker and Jeweler 

/5 South Tjejon St, 




AND 



lOOOWORTH 



A. 



^racoL^^"^; 



1739 Champa St., DENVER, COLO. 



E. W. WAPSOP & CO.. 



205 M. Tejon St. 



Draperies, Upholstery Goods, Furniture. Complete line of Screens, 
Pillows, Pillow Tops, Couch Covers, etc. 



The 50-mile-an-hour Wheel 


THE CRESCENT 


Reading Standard Bicycles 

SaEFF & KltidS Opposite Plaza Hotel 


BOWLING ALLEYS 

115-117 North Cascade Ave. 




u^er/cins Crockeri/ Co. 

F. A. PERKINS, Manager 

/20 ^. TJeJon Si. 


Telephone Main 863 
E. S. SOLLENBERGER, Mgr. 

Private Alleys for Ladies 
Eight Alleys on one Floor 
Special Rates to Parties and Clubs 


FRANK F. CRIMP 

FLORIST 

Phone 500 5og E. Columbia St. 

Special attention given to Telephone Orders. 


H. E. BOATRIGHT 

Public Stenographer 

33 GLDDINGS BLDG. 

Rates 5c per 100 words, 50c per hr. extra carbons 5c \ er page 



The epx Shoe eo. 

107 S. Tejon St. Colorado Springs, Colo. 
J. n. eox 



LADIES, MISSES AND CHILD- 
REN'S SHOES 

MEN'S, YOLTHS' AND BOYS' 
SHOES 



FRANK H. SMALL watches, Diamonds, fine Watcli Work. Special 
Jeweler and Silversmith Price to Students. 113 Pike's Peak Ave. 



Vol. VII. 



t;he TIGCR 



COLORADO COLLEGE, DECEMBER i, 1904. 



No. 12 




ATHLETIC 
DEPARTMENT 



THE TIGERS OF 1904 



The last football victory has been won, the last 
defeat suffered, and now we are ready to reivew 
the football season of 1904. To the most pes- 
simistic it has been a disappointment. The scores 
tell the story. But it was not the lack of ma 
tcrial or good coaching that gives Colorado her 
present standing. The coaching has been all that 
cculd be desired, and Coach Juneau has a large 
place in the heart of every man ®n the squad and 
every student interested in the great college 
game. We hope that Juneau can be induced to 
return, and that the boys will train next year 
and play both in practice and against their op- 
ponents with the good old Tiger Spirit that some- 
how was mislaid this year. 

By graduation two players will be ineligible to 
play next year. The rest of the squad is rea- 
scnably sure to return, so the prospects are not 
at all dark. The men who played in the cham- 
pionship games and on the second team this 
year are as follows : 

CENTERS. 

Bale, who this year completed his four years of 
fr.otball, played the best ball of his career and 
the most skillful of any center in the state. His 
passes V, ere true. He followed the ball well and 
recovered many fumbles. 

Hosteller, Bale's understudy, is a big, strong 
fellow, but had no experience when he joined the 
squad. He improved toward the end of the 
season, but could have played a much better game 
had he trained better and used more spirit. 

Tucker practiced faithfully and was always on 
the second team ready for his knocks. He is a 
College loyal. 

GUARDS. 

Hedblom is easily the best guard of the squad. 
This is but his second year, but he played a 



great game both on defense and offense. He 
played up to his limit all the time and always 
kept in good condition. Several of the critics 
pick him for the all-Colorado team. 

Roberts played an aggressive game, but is 
rather light for the position. 

Fawcett had never before played a line posi- 
tion, but he worked hard and got into the game 
well toward the last of the season, especially in 
the Mines game. He should make a good man for 
next year. 

Willis was also an inexperienced man, but is 
aggressive and stubborn, and will make the fel- 
lows hustle who wish to beat him for a place 
next year. 

TACKLES. 




NEAD — TAC*KLE. 



THE TIGER. 



Neacl is by most of the critics considered the 
greatest tackle in the state. , Those who saw 
him play in 1903 could scarcely believe that the 
1904 Nead is the same man. On defense he is 
a wizard, breaking through the line, smashing in- 
terference, and doing nearly all the tackling be- 
hind the line. On the offense his line plunging 
was the feature of several games, notably the 
game at Golden, and his long high punts gained 
much ground. His C with four bars shows four 
years of service culminated by a great finish. 



making of a good tackle. He is fast, aggressive 
and game, and determined to make the team. 




VANDE^MOKR — TACKI,!;. 

Although not as spectacular as Nead, Vande- 
moer is probably as good a defensive tackle as 
any Colorado could boast of. He was chosen by 
some of the coaches for one of the all-Colorado 
tackles. Vandemoer has two years of football 
yet and will without doubt develop into a still 
brighter star. 

Howbert played his first year of college foot- 
ball and was a tower of strength to his side of 
the line. Howbert always put a dash and spirit 
into his play that was a feature. 

Neal Vandemoer, although rather light, is the 



ENDS. 




CAPTAIN I.ORING T.ENNOX. 

Captain Loring Lennox proved his right to lead 
the team. The best testimony to his ability is 
the fact that he was the unanimous choice for 
end on the Colorado team. Lennox protected his 
territory well and managed the team like a vet- 
eran. 

Fisher, by his grit and speed, won a place as 
end and was substitute quarter. His tackling 
was the feature of his game. 

W. Lennox is a heady, aggressive player, and 
with experience will be as good as his brother. 

Willet and Kaull played ends on the second 
team. 

QUARTERBACKS. 

It is a common, open question whether Shorty 
or Billy is the better quarter. But the answers 
amount to nothing. They are both fast, gritty, 
aggressive little fellows who know the game well. 
Both were unfortunate in the way of injuries. 

HALFBACKS. 

Morgan played a great game, at halfback, and 
considering his weight is one of the best in the 
state. He is heady and aggressive and was the 
best man on the squad at gathering in fumbles. 

Hill did not attain his 1903 form. He once in 
a while made a few gains, but his fumbling was 
very costly in several games. 

Seybold is a strong, rugged player, but could 
not remember his coaching instructions. 

Fisk is light, but he makes up with speed and 
fight. He is one of the best offensive halves 
that wore a Tiger uniform this year. 



THE TIGER 




Gibbs, sub fullback, 170. 
Hedblom, guard, 193. 
Willis, sub guard, 173. 
Roberts, guard, 180. 




SCIEIRD— HALE'BACK. 



Scibird has all kinds of grit and played all he 
knew all the time. He is the man who hunts for 
a hole until the opponents get time to make a 
tackle, but he either finds one immediately or 
"hits the line." When Scibird develops speed 
ho will make a great halfback. 

FULLBACKS. 

Mack played his first year at full, but he filled 
the bill in a very neat wa}^ He is a good, strong 
player, both on defense and offense. 

Gibbs, his understudy, practiced faithfully and 
developed some ability at advancing the . ball. 
Gibbs gets hurt very easily. 

Following is a list of the players with their 
weights and positions : 

Bale, center, 185. 

Mack, fullback, 165. 

Scibird, halfback, 165. 

Fisk, sub halfback, 143. 

Morgan, halfback, 150. 

Fawcett, guard, 197. 

Mosteller, sub center, 187. 

Johnston, quarterback, 133. 

Randolph, quarterback, 135. 

L. Lennox, captain, end, 163. 

W. Lennox, end, 162. 

Fisher, end, quarterback, 152. 

Vandemoer, tackle, 185. 

Nead, tackle, 182. 

Howbert, tackle, 170. 

Hill, halfback, 155. 

Seybold, halfback, 170. 





MACK — FULLBACK. 

To THE Editor of the Tiger. 

Dear Sir : The work of our football team this 
past season calls for some caustic comment. The 
scores in the season's games speak for them- 
selves. Something was clearly wrong and ought 
to be set right before another year. To point out 
the mistakes and fix the blame as far as I can 
ir the purpose of this article. 

There was no lack of material, there was 
plenty of coaching, there was no quarreling among 
the players nor with the captain or coaches, and 
generally there was quite a respectable second 
team to scrimmage against. Some have imag- 
ined that our fraternities have hurt football. I 
have heard it whispered that this or that frater- 
nity thought their man ought to be on the team 
or that so and so was in the wrong fraternity to 
make the team. 

Personall}^, I am absolutely opposed to frater- 
nities, especially in our small College. But I 
9m glad to say that I have observed absolutely no 
tendency on their part to intermeddle in athletics. 



THE TIGER. 



1 hope this will always be so. Athletics is a 
truly College interest ; it is not within the proper 
sphere of College fraternities. They should 

have it entirely alone. 

The man responsible for our abominable sched- 
ule of games should bear the heaviest blame. To 
make the season successful with such a schedule 
would have been little short of marvelous. A 
championship team was a practical impossibility 
urder the circumstances. 

In view of the spirit and support shown the 
week before the Boulder game, in view of the 
ready subscription of money to pay our debts, I 
cannot say that there was no spirit in the school. 
There was spirit, very bright indeed at times, but 
m.uch of the time it was as lifeless as a corpse. 

Why can we not have such a spirit as is found 
\v other colleges? It was here once, a spirit 
which glows with loyal endeavor, which fires our 
hearts and minds to action, which at all times 
calls upon us to do our best for our College and 
ourselves. 

We need a spirit which says to every man, 
What you can do for your College you must; not 
alone in football, in everything, a spirit which 
kro\'S no failure and no turning back, a spirit 
\^ hich sacrifices itself and asks no favors except 
ib.e opportunity to do something for one's Col- 
lege, a spirit which will not permit a man to 
shn-k and say, "Oh, don't ask me. . Haven't I 
done enough ? I have done lots more than Scrub- 
by Jones." It is not enough to do more than 
some one else ; there* is no such thing as enough, 
unless one does his best. Whether we represent 
our College h'' "football or track, debating, theat- 
ricals, or anything else, no matter what we do, 
wo fail unless we do our best. 

This is the law of College as well as of the 
w orld. A man has scant respect from his fel- 
l"ws, if he fritters away his opportunities, shirks 
his duty and fails to accomplish what he might, 
\vdd he done his best. 

The only way Colorado College or any other 
school can play winning i >ntball is to support the 
team, respect the men who do their best, en- 
courage them, help them. The students must 
show that the whole College is alive to the game 
and backs the team to w'in. 

In the face of financial difficulties and a poor 
schedule, the College started the season with good 
material and a good coach. The first s'^tback was 
the sandburrs. The field could h,>ve been 

cleared, but it was not, and as a result many 
oi the players suffered serious injuries from the 
"miserable stickers." 

Lack of proper football equipment, inade<~(uate 
protection to the players and the unsprinkled 
condition of the field were enough to make a 
coach despair, but these were difficulties rather 
of management and finance than of football. 



The need of a training table was sorely felt. 
There was little money to run it, but this was not 
all. A training table is but half a training table 
unless every man eats at the table. So many of 
the men were unwilling to come that its benefit 
would have been but small. Then, too, the ex- 
perience of past years has shown that the very 
men at the training table would not train. 

To come to the faults of the team itself. The 
team would not train, the men could not be made 
to train, to practice regularly, or to work. This 
was the whole story of the season. 

There were some men who did train, who kept 
proper hours, ate proper food, and cut out soda, 
fudge, dances and social life. These men de- 
serve the respect of the whole College. One need 
only have seen their playing to know their names. 

I dislike to enter into individual criticism : it is 
c\F likely to hurt as to help the situation. But 
tlere are certainly several men who should feel 
the weight of the students' displeasure. No self- 
respecting institution would tolerate such action. 
It seems to be one of the troubles with our stu- 
dent body that we harbor in our student body a 
considerable number of individuals who not mere- 
ly tolerate it but who hail such a man as one of 
their own ilk and pat him on the back. 

But when a man has distinguished himself 
above all others for his being out nights to dances 
and parties repeatedly, for his absolute disregard 
of the rules of training, for his listless practice, 
for his repeated and unexcused absence and for 
his complete lack of attention to the orders of 
the captain or the coaches, what is to be done? 

Any self-respecting institution would brand 
h^m only too quickly as a "quitter," and hold 
him up to scorn as a wearer of the "yellow 
streak." 

The College might just as well make up its 
mind that unless the team trains, all other sac- 
rifice is for naught; no trainer, no coach, no cap- 
tain, no amount of good material will make a 
team without training. 

Half of the players showed lack of sleep; their 
frequent injuries and poor w^ind showed their 
lack of condition. Those who were faithful had 
t(^ do two men's work, and only too often were in- 
jured trying to do more than their strength, play- 
ing their own position and that of a fellow player 
who shirked his work and failed to train. 

There is no use of our trying to have a team 
again unless we can have the following condi- 
tions : 

We must have a captain who will train, who 
w^ill set an example to his men, who avHI give 
up all else, society, parties and all, for his work. 

We must have a trainer who will unflinchingly 
fire every man who does not train, no matter 
w^ho he is. 

Finally, we must have a spirit in the student 



THE TIGER. 



body which will stand behind the coach and ap- 
prove of this position by treating any man who 
l;as the temerity to break training or play the 
part of a quitter as a "dead one." 

The team must obey its captain and its coach, 
and its members must learn that in football ex- 
cuses don't count. What counts is to hold your 
tongue and work. 

He is indeed a poor pup who is so poor as to 
Ir.ck an excuse. But in football there are no ex- 
cuses. 

Every man must be out every night, must work 
and keep his mouth shut. 

This is the only way there is to play football, 
and the only way there ever can be to play foot- 
ball. 

For next year we have bright prospects. Only 
two of our this year's team graduate, and it seems 
probable that most of the rest of our players will 
return another season. 

The material which we shall have to build with 
i.- excellent. With money pledged to pay our 
debts, we shall be on our feet financially. 

It remains for the College to see to it that the 
men, now here, remain; that the money pledged 
i: raised and paid in ; that everyone hustles to 
bring men and spirit to the school ; that the spirit 
of the College compel every man' to do his best, 
first, last and all the time', to push the College, 
to push the team, to encourage each player to his 
best and make every man who shirks smart in 
well deserved disgrace. Yours, 

Chilly, 'oi. 




FOOTBALL SCORES. 

At Washburn Field— C. S. H. S.,i8; W. D. 
Ji. S., o. 

At Pueblo — Centennial, 6; North Denver Hign 
School, o. 

At Denver — School of Mines, 14; Denver Uni- 
versity, 6. 

At Denver — Leland Stanford, 2>2)\ University 
of Colorado, o. 

At Washington, Pa. — Dickinson, 10 ; Wash- 
ington and Jefferson, 6. 

At Philadelphia — Pennsylvania, 34; Cornell, o. 

At Philadelphia — Army, 1 1 ; Navy, o. 

At Salt Lake — University of Utah, 43 ; Colo- 
rado College, o. 

At Columbus — Carlisle Indians, 23 ; Ohio State 
University, o. 

At St. Louis — Haskell Indians, 47; Washing- 
ton, o. 

At Kansas City — Kansas, 29 ; Missouri, o. 

At Cedar Rapids — Minnesota, 11; Iowa, o. 

At Indianola, Iowa — Simpson, 10; Grinnell, 6. 

At St. Louis— Carlisle, 38; Haskell, 4. 

At Chicago — Chicago, 18; Wisconsin, 11. 



THE SEASON'S SCORES. 



C S. H. S o 

Centennial H. S 5 

Denver (practice) o 

Sacred Heart o 

Alumni (?) o 

Boulder 23 

Denver (championship) . . 14 

Fort Collins o 

Golden 4 

Utah 43 



Colorado College 
12 
6 

5 
41 

5 
o 
8 
4 
4 
o 



INTERCOLLEGIATE LEAGUE 
Plaved. Tied. Won. 
I 2 

2 

1 I 
o o 

The above does not consider the games played 
by Boulder, as they did not finish the season in 
the League. They had lost one game — to Golden, 
leaving the Miners the undisputed champions of 
the state. 



Golden 

Denver 

Colorado College 
Fort Collins . . . 



Lost. 
o 
I 
I 
3 



Pet. 
1,000 
666 
500 
000 



HEXTER — MANAGER. 



She came up to the country 

But a week or so ago. 
This city maid who ne'er had seen 

The fields where wild flowers grow 
And when she saw the cat-tails, 

She cried, "Oh, look, quick ! 
Who ever heard of sausages 

A-growing on a stick." 



8 



THE TIGER. 



THE TIGER. 

Published weekly during the College year by 
The Tiger Publishing Co., in the interest of Colo- 
rado College. 

J. Y. Crothers Editor-in-Chief 

T. Hunter Assistant Editor-in-Chief 

J. I. Muffley Athletic Editor 

Miriam Carpenter Literary Editor 

Mabel Barbee Alumni Editor 

A. H. Fisher Local Editor 

Bert Wasley Business Manager 

C. A. Hedblom .... Assistant Business Manager 

CORRESPONDENTS: 

Mr. Nash, Miss McDowell, Miss Isham, Miss 
Kidder, Mr. Lamb, Mr. Reeks, Miss Arbuckle. 

Subscription, $1.25 per year, payable in advance. 
Single copy, 5 cents. 

The Tiger is forwarded to all subscribers until 
ordered discontinued and all arrearanges are paid. 

Students, Professors and Alumni are invited 
to contribute literary articles, personals and items. 
Contributions must be accompanied by the writer's 
name. 

Address all communications to The Tiger. 
Colorado College, Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Entered at the Postoffice at Colorado Springs, 
Colo., as second-class matter. 



Patronize Tiger Advertisers 



EDITORIAL 



WHY? 

IVj OW that the football season is past, we may 
try to solve the problem of our defeats. 
While we lost some good men from last year's 
team, we can scarcely blame our material, for at 
the beginning of the year it was said that we had 
the kind of men from whom championship teams 
are made. The coach was not at fault, for he 
knew the game well^ and knew how to impart his 
knowledge to others. He was a man for whom 
the men would put forth their best efforts, too, 
for he convinced them of his earnest desire that 
they should win, and he gained their confidence, 
respect and love. One serious defect seems to 
have been the lack of training. In many of the 
games the men did not seem to be in the superb 
ph.ysical condition which nerves a man to put 
forth his best efforts, even though he may not 
think it absolutely necessary, or which endows 
him with the energy of despair. There was too 
listless playing when victory seemed assured, and 



not enough sand when defeat was equally assured. 
This was the misfortune, as much as the fault 
of the players, for they were not in proper con- 
dition. The Athletic Association had no training 
table this fall, but it should by all means do so 
next year, when it will be free of debt. Then 
the men should be kept in strict training. That 
the students may know what this means, the 
Tiger hopes to publish several articles during the 
year, showing what training means in the best 
schools of the country. Another thing the Tigers 
had to contend with was the lack of backing on 
the part of the students, with the single exception 
of the Boulder game. On that day the ghost of 
Tiger Spirit might nave said, "Great is Tiger 
Spirit ; before me there was no Tiger Spirit, and 
after me there shall be no Tiger Spirit." The 
flash of enthusiasm had the energy of a flash of 
gunpowder, but it was over as soon. 



INTER-CLASS GAMES. 

"T^HERE is to be a great event on Washburn 
Field, when the annual Freshman-Sophomore 
game will be played. The College was almost 
cheated out of the pleasure of seeing this won- 
derful contest by a dispute as to whether ''C" 
men should be allowed to participate. It seems 
to be the general conviction that, as a general 
thing, it would be better to bar the "C" men, but 
the question should be settled far enough ahead 
to prevent any knowledge on the part of either 
class as to whether the ruling would hurt it. The 
right thing to do would be to make a definite 
ruling now, which shall hold for all time. Let 
men with "C's" pi'ay in all inter-class football 
and baseball games, or in none. Another thing 
that should be settled as closely as possible is 
the date of the contests. They should be held 
early in the season, for the greatest good they 
do is the development of raw material. Another 
gain is the fact that more people get in the habit 
of going down to the athletic field to watch prac- 
tice, and consequently get more enthused over the 
first team and the championship. The sight of 
half a dozen teams on the field at once going 
through signals or in scrimmage is enough to 
make the blood of the most sluggist run quicker. 
For the very reason that one purpose of inter- 
class games is to develop new material, it is un- 
necessary that first team men should play in these 
games. An additional advantage in having the 
football game earlier in the season is that it will 
be a safety valve for exuberant spirits of Fresh- 
men and Sophomores. So long as conditions are 
left as they have been, trouble will arise eacn 
year at the opening of College. Parties will ne 
disturbed, hats stolen, hose brought into use. 
articles get into the daily papers, and Prexy will 



THE TIGER. 



hc.vt visions of his friends' millions floating' off 
to other institutions. If this is to apply to the 
Senior-Faculty game, all members of the latter 
august body who played on the College team 
when undergrads must also be considered ruled 
out. 



"THE TiGiiK acknowledges the receipt of "The 
Most Popular College Songs" from the pub- 
lishers, Hinds, Noble & Eldredge. The book con- 
tains a well chosen collection of college songs, 
w hich all College students would do well to own. 
The serious, the sentimental and the ludicrous are 
cill well proportioned in this collection. Persons 
from Eastern institutions notice the absence of 
College singing among us. There are scarcely 
any memories of College days more precious to 
the old grads than those of the College or Class 
"sings." We have noticed, however, that many 
among us fail to enjoy what few songs are sung, 
because they do not know the words. There is 
no excuse for them when such a reasonable price 
is put on a publication as on that mentioned above. 
Fifty cents will purchase "The Most Popular Col- 
lege Songs, while larger collections are published 
b} the same company for a higher price. 



A CORRECTION. 

T'HE printer did not know the circumstances, 
or he never would have said that it is Baylis 
who 

"Rules with iron hand 
And listens to each meek demand 
And turns it down to beat the band." 
The iron-handed monarch is Walter. 

No, indeed, if you want anything at all, ask 
Paylis ; he himself is the one who makes "meek 
demands" noW, and is being trained to comply 
with each request without once answering back. 
Don't you know him? Why, he's the man who 
!^,oes around with catlike tread and deprecating 
smile. The former is a recent habit, formed by 
late returns home after an evening out with the 
boys: the latter is to forestall any joshing on the 
part of the fellows. The reason for this strange 
change of behavior is already knov^^n to most of 
you. Baylis is a benedict. Many happy returns. 



I N a letter from a friend recently we were ad- 
vised to cuss the printer once in a while on 
general principles. When we saw the Cad's 
"Love Poem's in the *^ollege department last 
week we "felt a swear," to use Dr. Lancaster's 
expression. We hope the general public would 
recognize the source of said effusiveness, how- 
ever, without being told. 



THE FRF.SIIMAN-SOPHOMORE GAME. 

It is all settled ! The Freshmen and vSopho- 
mores will buck each other on vSalurday after- 
noon on Washburn Field gridiron. It will be a 
great contest. Both teams are ])racticing hard, 
and both are equally sure of victory. Charlie 
Leuchtenberg, the crack baseball player, will 
captain the Sophs, and Neal Vandemoer will be 
at the business end of the Freshies. 

Managers McCreery and McClintock with then- 
assistants will occupy boxes. The coy Freshman 
girls will be there with husky voices and moist 
eyes. The wise Sophomore girls will attend, con- 
fident that victory will hover over the colors of 
'07. Don't miss the greatest game of the season. 



LIBRARY ASSOCIATIONS. 

Last week two hundred and twenty-two new 
books arrived at the Library which were pur- 
chased with the W. Eliot Fette fund. 

The whole number belong to a single set, "The 
German National Literature," and consist of re- 
prints of the best of German literature from the 
very earliest periods down to the present. The 
selection was made by Prof. Louis A. E. Ahlers. 

Dr. Wilfred P. Mustard, a former instructor 
ir Colorado College, now of Haverford College, 
i:' the author of another volume, "Classical 
Echoes in Tennyson." This is the third of a 
series, "Studies in English," now being published 
'by Columbia University. Dr. Mustard has just 
sent a copy to the Library. 

A very valuable gift to the Engineering Li- 
brary has been made recently by Mr. John Her- 
ron of Telluride, Colorado. He sent thirteen of 
the recent volumes of the Transactions of the 
American Society for Civil Engineers, also five 
volumes of the Transactions of the American 
Institute of Mining Engineers and six volumes 
of the Journal of the Association of Engineering 
Societies. This is the largest single donation 
which has yet been made to the Engineerhig Li- 
brary. A few years ago Mr. Herron had a son 
in the Cutler Academy who was very popular 
and is well remembered by all the older students 
of the College and Academy. 



BIOLOGY DEPARTMENT. 

A valuable addition has been made to the 
Department of Biology in the gift of 250 excel- 
lent slides, showing normal and diseased tissues. 
The slides are the gift of Dr. C. F. Gardiner, in 
memory of Dr. J. R. Tillinghast. 

Dr. Gardner has also presented several pieces 
0+ apparatus to be used in Physiology. 



IC 



THE TIGER 



FRESHMAN REPRESENTATIVES. 

The four men to represent the Freshman Class 
in the annual Freshman- Sophomore declamation 
contest were selected Wednesday night of last 
week from the eight entered in the preliminaries. 
The winners and their declamations are : A. E. 
Harper, "The Parson of Cactus Flats/' by Ed- 
mund Day; Mark Mohler, "An Appeal to Arms," 
by Patrick Henry; Martin Musser, "The Black 
Horse and His Rider," by GeorgeTippard ; and 
E. S. Stickney, "The Last Ditch," by C. W. New- 
comb. 

These with the four Sophomores will contest 
for honors in the final contest on Tuesday night, 
December 13. 

The Sophomores are : "Gleason Lake, "The 
Heart of Old Hickory;" W. A. Bartlett, "Tbe 
Sign of the Cross," by Nelson Barrett ; C. R. 
Kaul, "The Bishop's Sin," from "The Prisoner 
of Zenda," by Anthony Hope; and Irwin C. Mc- 
Bride, "Regulus to the Carthaginians," by E. 
Kellogg. 

The presence of an audience was not per- 
mitted, and the only ones to hear the. prelimi- 
nary contest were Mr. DeWitt, the judges — Miss 
Marianna Brown, Dr. Finlay and Prof. Noyes, 
and a few curious people at the crack of the 
door. 



CROSS-COUNTRY CLUB. 

Cross-country running is a sport that is open 
t(^ all, and a great deal of benefit can be derived 
,from it. Boulder's success in the track meet 
k'st spring was due in a large measure to their 
cross-country club. There is some talk of or- 
ganizing a club here this winter, and it is to be 
hoped that the effort will be successful. This 
club will not cost anything, because there is no 
costly apparatus or suits to buy. All that is nec- 
essary is a sweater, an old pair of trousers, golf 
or bicycle to be preferred, and a pair of tennis 
shoes, or running shoes with short spikes. Ev- 
ery man in College is invited to join, and the 
exercise will not hurt anybody. It will be ex- 
cellent preparation for the baseball player as well 
ar the track man. Willis R. Armstrong, '99, will 
aid in the organization of the club and will help 
Ic set it going well. 



LECTURE TONIGHT. 

President W. G. M. Stone, of the Colorado 
State Forestry Association, will deliver an illus- 
trated lecture this evening in Perkins Auditorium 
under the auspices of the University Extension 
Lecture Committee and the Pike's Peak Poly- 
technic Club. No student should miss this op- 
portunity to learn of a question which so closely 



concerns the future of his state. The lecture will 
be interesting as well as instructive. 



NOTICE. 



The Librarian's assistant failed to take the 
nr.me of the student who took out Roberts' 
Rules of Order in October. The one who has 
it will confer a great favor on the Librarian by 
returning it immediately. 



ADDITIONS TO THE MUSEUM. 

Curator L. C. Himebaugh has recently in- 
stalled in the Colorado College Museum some 
interesting and valuable collections. These 
latest additions are the Bixby-Zang and Deane 
collections from the Cliff-Dwellers and a case 
ot Egyptian relics from the Egyptian Explora- 
tion Society, of which Colorado College is a 
member. 

The Bixby-Zang collection was gathered in 
southeastern Utah and northern ^^"izona during 
the years 1897-98 from the ruins of cliff dwell- 
ings, the caves and mounds of those regions, 
principally the Chinlee, Cottonwood and Comb- 
Wash Canons. The Deane collection was made 
ir; western New Mexico and includes over 800 
specimens of pottery, implements, skulls and 
idols. 

The Egyptian collection is comprised of almost 
500 specimens of pottery, implements, skulls and 
mummies. The 150 pieces of pottery are excep- 
tionally well preserved, and the old Egyptian, 
Grecian and Roman art designs are vividly re- 
produced. The skulls are characterized by the 
artificial flattening of the back and the im- 
mense size and strength of the lower jaw; the 
teeth 'are large and well-wonl, though decayed 
places are rarely found. 

During the last v. eek a cocoanut raincoat from 
the Philippine Islands was presented to the mu- 
seum by Miss Mabel Spicer, who is one of the 
Colorado Springs teachers in the islands. 



C. C. o, U. OF U. 43. 

The Tigers made a trip to Salt Lake and 
spent Thanksgiving there. On the afternoon of 
Turkey Day they lined up against the strong team 
o"" University of Utah and were defeated by the 
overwhelming score of 43 to o. As a team the 
Tigers did not play football. Lennox did some 
good work. Hill kept up his tendency to fumble. 

(This mention brief by request.) 



Students, if in need of glasses or repairs on 
same, see Ashby, the Optical Jeweler, the oldest 
established in the county. You will find every- 
thing right. 



THE TIGBR. 



IT 



ALUMNI NOTES. 

Mrs. Anna T. Dye announced ihe engagement 
of her daughter, Myrtle Belle, to Mr. Lloyd Ed- 
win Hawley, at a prettily appointed luncheon 
last Saturday. The wedding will occur in Grace 
church at 5 o'clock, December nth. Miss Dye 
was a student at Cutler Academy, and Mr. Haw- 
ley is an ex-member of the present Senior Class 
in the College. 

Ruth Lewis, '04, has been visiting at the Col- 
lege for the last week. 

Pansy Raynolds, '02, is in New York, study- 
ing Domestic Science. She will take her degree 
in that branch of work next June. 

Eulalie Reinhardt spent Thanksgiving in the 
Springs. She is very much pleased with her ^vork 
in Cripple Creek and says that the little '"miners" 
trke very readily to Espanol. 

Muriel Hill, '04, is teaching in Empire, Colo- 
rado. Miss Hill has all grades, from kinder- 
garten to Psychology and Ethics — so they say. 
But even if it is not true, we could not well 
imagine a more versatile person for the place. 

Cupid has several very important annourxe- 
ments to make in the near future. One in par- 
ticular will surprise yon all. It begins like tliis : 
"School mistress, resignation" — but tliat is tell- 
ing, and you must wait, so be patient. 

Florence Leidigh, '01, has returned to Colo- 
rado Springs. She expects to take up library 
work. 

G. A. Collins, ex-'o5, coached the football 
team of the Santa Fe High School during the 
past season. 



TIGER NOTES. 

McGregor girls gave a spread Thursday even- 
ing. 

Edith McCreery spent Thanksgiving with 
Helen Crawford in Denver. 

Vacation ! Two weeks from next Friday. 

Several of the girls went on a tramp through 
North Cheyenne Canon Saturday. 

Another Math exam. Poor Freshies ! 

Edith Burns gave a spread Saturday evening. 



Misses McNeen, Davis and Weir spent 
Thanksgiving at their homes. 

The Minerva Clubhouse will soon be a reality. 

Wanted — More men to enter the preliminary 
for the intercollegiate oratorical contest. Do you 
want to do a great thing for yourself and your 
. College? Then write an oration and go up 
against the Philistines from Boulder, D. U., 
Golden and Fort Collins, and beat th^m. If you 
can do that you are the man the College wants. 
Mr. DeWitt is looking for you. 

The eight speakers for the class declamation 
contest between the Freshmen and Sophs have 
been chosen. A lively time is expected on De- 
cember 13. Members of the two classes had 
better l)e finding some yells and plan how they 
;ire going to cheer their men on to victory. 

Prof, (in Latin B) — They lie in wait for old 
men, that they may send them into their pre- 
serves. 

Miss Eleanor Pease entertained a number of 
the girls at a Thanksgiving spread. 

Misses Whitehurst and Simington took Thanks- 
giving dinner with Miss Frost , 

Mrs. Simington has been visiting her daughter 
this week. 

Misses Hope and Ruth Smith entertained a 
number of College people Monday evening. 

The girls tennis tournament will probably be 

finished this week. 

Among the visitors Thanksgiving were Misses 
Sims, Martin and McDowell of Denver, and 
Misses Brush, Haynes and Fezer of Greeley. 

The new College Calendar for 1905 arranged 
by Mr. DeWitt will come from the printer on 
Monday. It contains twenty-five half-tone en- , 
gravings of College scenes and will be on sale at 
the Book Store. 

The Rice boys gave the team a box of fruit 
a.' they passed through Grand Junction. 

The McGregor girls "didn't do much" to 
th.ose Thanksgiving boxes from home. 

A crowd of College girls and guests spent 
last Saturday in Cheyenne Canon. 

Mr. and Mrs. "Prexy" were at home to the 



THE TIGER 



Freshmen Tuesday evening. All report a jolly 
time. 

The Sophs anticipate another victory over 
the Freshies in football. If you don't believe it, 
ccme and see. 

The football team had a fine trip, the only 
annoyance being the U. U. team. 

The coach was given a fine "send-off" Mon- 
day night. 

The Modern Language evenings are again 
being enjoyed at Ticknor Study. 

Dr. Parsons gave an interesting illustrated 
lecture on "A Swiss University Town," Tues- 
day evening in Perkins. 



Everyone who is interested in the organization 
of a cross-country club is requested to be at the 
Gymnasium at 4:15 P. M. on Friday. Past per- 
formances are not a qualification for member- 
ship. 

Don't forget the Minerva Candy Sale, one week 
from today, down town. 

Stuffy protests he did not commit suicide. He 
claims to be able to prove an alibi. 

We had our pictures taken Wednesday. Some 
o^ the pleasant looks haven't worn off yet. 

You're lucky if you haven't three exams this 
week, and still more so if you do not see your 
name in the familiar handwriting (?) on the 
v.'all of Palmer, next the bulletin board. 



The tennis tournament has narrowed down to The worm has turned. You can not overcut 

Nash vs. Parsons. Nash has won one set, but any more without feeling the bad effects — in the 

the remainder can not be played before Friday. shape of the overcut exam. 

SOCIETIES AND ASSOCIATIONS 



APOLLONIAN CLUB. 

Program, jjecember 2 : 

'"The Invcntnr of the Postage Stamp" 

W. LennoK 
Speech, "The Late Postmaster General Payne" 

Tyler 
Paper, "Postal Methods in Foreign Countries" 

Gibbs 

Solo, Selected Slauson 

Paper, "Packet Post in England" Morgan 

Debate, "Resolved, That the United States should 
adopt a system of penny postage on letters." 

Affirmative Randolph, Fiske 

Negative Johnston, Nead 



MINERVA. 
December 2, closed meeting. 



PEARSONS LITERARY SOCIETY. 

Owing to the absence of several participants, 
the preliminary debate was postponed one week. 



THE PEARSONS CLUBHOUSE. 

The Pearsons Clubhouse is at last a thing of 
the bright present. It is to the casual observer 
not exactly a thing of beauty, but to the Pear- 



sons boys it is destined to be a joy forever. The 
Clubhouse is the old Ferris School, which will 
be moved to its final resting place on the Campus 
overlooking the whole of Washburn Field and 
commanding an unobstructed view of the moun- 
tains. The nouse contains two large reception 
and lounging rooms, a large auditorium with a 
seating capacity of about a hundred and fifty, 
cloak rooms, a fine kitchen where great barrels 
of delicious Pearsons Punch can be concocted, 
and lastly, a sun parlor with long door-windows, 
which will be used as a study and reading room. 
Plenty of room is to be had for the confinement 
of the "goat" in a large carret, while the building- 
will be heated by furnace and fitted out with the 
modern conveniences and improvements. The 
work of remodelling will be done by the mem- 
bers of the society, and a new coat of paint will 
be administered in the near future. .It is expect- 
ed that the rooms will be ready for use by the 
first of the year, and Pearsons can then claim 
for hers the best clubhouse on the Campus, with 
plenty of room for all occasions, a view that will 
never be obstructed, and a place where, better 
than ever before, the men can uphold the 'Pear- 
sons standard of work and the Pearsons motto, 
"Unity and Push." Watch for it ! 



CONTEMPORARY. 



The meeting of December 2 will be closed. 



THE TIGER. 



13 



Y. W. C. A. 



Last Friday the girls were very much pleased 
t( welcome Miss Taylor, one of our Secretaries, 
who spoke very interestingly at Y. W. C. A. 
meeting. 

She spoke on the subject of Thanksgiving, 
;ind emphasized the fact that we should have the 
s];irit of thanksgiving throughout the year. An- 
other point that she brought out was happiness. 
We should be happy and show by example that 
the Christian life is one of great joy. 

We should think of all we owe to God and 
keep in touch with Him. 



C. A. Taking for his subject, "Private Devo- 
tion," Mr. Day said in substance: 



Y. M. C. A. 



Last Sunday afternoon we had ,the pleasure of 
listening to Mr. Day, Secretary of the City Y. M. 



Prayer gives us vigor and prepares us for our 
work. It is of such importance that the first 
entrance into the day should be spiritual. We 
should ha\e s(Miie private place where we can pray 
without being molested. In going to prayer we 
should ])c ])reparc(l, not only by thinking out be- 
forehand what we wish to say, whether it be to 
thank God for blessings received or to ask a favor, 
l)ut we should come with a forgiving spirit. Only 
then will our prayers be heard. If we wish our 
prayers to be answered we should pray for definite 
things and e.xpect results. 

Mr. Fenis whistled "The Holy City." 



»ei^*^*i*^>^8ii|i^i^.rr.r.*^ 



ACADEMY DEPARTMENT 

Farle S. Alden Editor 

f . C. Merrill Athletic Editor 



THE CUTLER TEAM. 

Now that the football season is over we may 
look back at the games that have been played by 
the team and see that, although we did not win 
a single game, yet Cutler had a team of which 
shr may well be proud. 

The loss of the Central game was due to two 
causes. One of these was the lack of a coach, 
and the second the lack of a fair official. In 
spite of the kn.own fact that our team could not 
win from the Centennial boys, the game was 
played. They lost the game, but by their ever- 
present pluck and courage they won the admira- 
tion of every spectator ere the game was half 
finished, and many times loud cheers came from 
the Pueblo grandstand for the Cutler boys. At 
Cripple Crerek, Cutler outclassed her opponents, 
but little can be said of the game, it having been 
played on an ice pond on the hill side. 

Haight made a hit at Pueblo and didn't care to 
go to Cripple Creek with the team. 

Did the team enjoy the midnight right thro.ugh 
Royal Gorge ? Not much ! 

How is Mrs. MacDonald of Canon City? Ask 
Boyse. 

Moses bought a ticket for Utah. It has seven 
stubs attached to it. 



Snow Ball wasn' present at the reception. He 
doesn't care, for little Red Riding Hood wasn't 
there. 

Mr. President — Bring back the torch to Kelley. 

Bell and Allie make good flunkies. 

Kindergaten? No Slippery Fingers. 



THE CHAMPIONSHIP. 

Centennial was without question the champions 
of the Southern Division. 

On the night of November 22 a League meet- 
ing was called at Denver. The schools repre- 
sented were East Denver, North Denver, Manual, 
West Denver, Cripple Creek and Cutler. A pro- 
test was entered against a Manual player. The 
protest stood, and Manual forfeited her game to 
North Denver. This gave North Denver the 
championship of the Northern Division. 

On Thanksgiving Day Centennial and North 
Denver played at Pueblo to decide the state 
. chcampion.ship. The game resulted in a ivctory 
for Centennial by a score of 6 to o. 



Full many a flower is born to blush unseen 
And waste its sweetness on the desert air ; 

Full many a bathing suit, we also note 

Appears so small you hardly know it's there. 



THE TIGER 



wareHEs, DiaM©iMos 




a Special Discount of 10 per cent, to all Students 



Zehner's 

Successors to 

Goodspeed & Go. 
26 P. P. ave. 

The 'bery latest in 

Brooches, Stick Pins, 

Sterling Silver 

Novelties 



CHARLES P. BENNETT 

Real Estate, Loans 
and Insurance*^ ^ 

NO. 5 PIKE'S PEAK AVENUE 



ElectroThermatoriuni Bath Parlors 

124 South Tejon Street 

Hot Air, Electric and Turkish Baths, Electric 

Light, Salt Glow and Packs. 

COLLINS & CO., Props. 



Bookkeeping 

Shorthand 

Typewriting 



CENTRAL 



^. 



usiness 



College 



College Estab- 
lished in 
Denver in (887 



L. A. ARNOLD, Pres. J. C. CROY, Prin. 

Nichols Block, IS and 20 S. Tejon St., 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Rooms inviting, Work Thorough, Teachers up-to-date 

Call or Write for Information. 



■THE COtOHAOOROAO. 




If you Want 



^^""?.«ooiSouWt»-*^^' 



The Quic^e^t, 

The Mo^t 

Saii^ factory 



Line to Denver or Pueblo buy a Colo- 
rado & Southern Ticket. Get them at 
City Office, i <, N. Tejon. 

J. H. SPRINGER, Commercial Agent. 
Come in and ask questions. 



THE TIGER. 



'5 



WHEN IN NEED OF CLOTHING, HATS 
OR FURNISHINGS 

We would suggest that you consult your 

professor as to the best place to go. 

We are willing to abide by their 

judgement as they all trade 

with us. We give spe- 

ial discount tostudents 

The B. W. DAVIS CLOTHING & FUR- 
NISHING CO., 102 N. Tejon St. 



The WiIliamson=Haffner 
Engraving Company 



1633 Arapahoe Street DENVER 



7)r, To. ^owlery 

DENTIST 



IS South TJejon St, 



G. W. Pauly, B. S., D. O. Mrs. Lona E. Pauly, B. S. D. O. 

Graduates of A. T. Still's College of Osteopathy, 

Kirksville, Mo. 

DR. & MRS. PAULY, %^^fSl^IM'' 

Office, rooms 30.3-304 lieGraff Bldg. 118 N. Tejon St., Colo- 
rado Springs, Colo. Phones— Office Red 1272; Res. Ked323 
Hours 8 to 12 a . m . , 1 to 5 p . m. 



F* H* Weeks 

26 East Bi)o\i St. 

Photographs taken any hour 
of the day or evening by 
flashlight. Especially suit- 
able for groups. Call and see 
samples. 

Special R.ates t3 Stadeivts 



next 



You are next to a good hair cut or shave when you patronize 



s The Manhattan Barber Shop, J. R. WEYMAR, Prop. 3o e. bijou 



WHITAKER & GARDNER 


^Ag=SlAUNDRv 


30 N. TEJON ST. 

Headqaarters for 


'^"1^'-=-^ 


eolleqe Shoes 

OF EVERY DESCRIPTION 

We have the best mining and civil engineering boot 
in the market 

WHITAKER & GARDNER 


THE STAR is the leader for prompt 
and satisfactory service. 

SPECIAL RATES to students of col- 
lege and academy 

S. E. BENNETT, College Ag't. 


'Bhe Best Yet 


w. I. Luefls 


COLLEGE PILLOW TOPS shows everv 
important College Building. Souvenir of 


Columbia, Hartford, Rambler, Ideal & Tribune Bicycles 


The only first-class re air shop in town. Chainles« wheels 
a specialty. Wheels for rent. Phoue517-A. 1 29 N. Tejon 


Loilege Uays. 

Ashford & Roberts, pe n. 

Tejon St. 

15 per cent discount io students on framing 


Broken hearts Can be Mended (Rivited or Ce= 

mented) By taking them to the hospital for repair- 
ing Cut Glass and China. MARIE R. FORBISH, Arj 
Studio, 108 N. Tejon. 



When in doubt, take the safe side. Send bundles to the 
Est.-oyrs 6olorado SpHngs Laundry ralph rice conege Agi 



i6 



THE TIGER 











Colorado College 




THE OLDEST INSTITUTION FOR 




HIGHER EDUCATION IN THE WEST 




FOUNDED AT COLORADO 




SPRINGS IN J874 




Colorado College now offers advantages of the same 




grade as the best institutions. 






For information concerning Courses of Study, Rooms 






and Board, Physical Culture, etc., apply to 






WM. F. SLOCUM, President, 






or EDWARD S. PARSONS, Dean. 






For information in regard to the College Department of 






Music, inquire of 






EDWARD S. PARSONS, Dean. 






Those wishing information as to the Courses in Drawing, 






Painting, Designing, etc., etc., inquire of 






EDWARD S. PARSONS, Dean. 






For information concerning the Engineering Depart- 






ment, apply to 






FLORIAN CAJORI, 






Dean of Engineering School. 


> 


Cutler Academy 


Cutler Academy is the Associated Prepartory School of 




Colorado College, in which students are prepared for any 






American College. Address, 






M. C. GILE, Principal. 


, 









THE TIGBR 



17 



The Albert Sechrist Manufacturing Co. 

WILL INSTALL GAS and 



1033 16th 
Street 




ELECTRIC FIXTURES 

in your residence at Colorado Springs 
same price as Denver, without extra 
charge. Call and select your fixtures, 
or will send you a catalogue. 



DENVtR, 
COLO. 




**l5he line ihat suit's them all," 

Going Away for 
Christmas? 

If so, the best road to travel is 
Via 



ROUTE 



Colorado Midland 



RaLilwa^y 



Reaches Cripple Creek, Buena Vista, Leadville, Aspen, 
Grand Junction and the West. 

Personally conducted California tours each week. 

R. T. DUNWAY, C. P. & T. A. 
C. H. SPEERS. Colorado Springs H. C. BUSH, 

Gen. Pass. Agent Traffic Manager. 

DENVER, COLO. 



^ to agon Load of ^ ^ 

Ne^w Wood Type 

AtxA OtHer Me^tet*ia^ls 

OfthcVery Latent at your "DUpo^alJ^or 

Wirvdow Ca^rds 
Tickets, Flyers etc 

B JV G 'Ru\ V IJV G — C he r in est 

The Telegraph Job Rooms 119 e. p. p. Ave. 

Ask wKere TKe Tieer is Printed 



The ©Id 

Surio Store 

Wholesale and Retail 
Dealers in 

GENUINE INDIAN GOODS AND 
CURIOSITIES 

J. S. CANDELARIO, Prop., 

301 and 303 San Francisco Street, 

SANTA FE, N. M. 



NEW EMPIRE THEATRE 3 shows Daily ^^ l Matinee 3 P. M. 

Evenings 7:30 and 8:45 



10C 



VAUDEVILLE- 



IOC 



i8 



THE TIGER 



El Paso Cleaning & Tailoring Co. 

10 E. Kiowa St. Phone Main 667=A Colo. Springs 



Pressing Dyeing 

C'eaning Repairing 



Alte ing 
Tailcring 



Prof. Chas. J. Hausdorf 

TE4CHER OF MANDOLIN, OUITAR AND BANJO 

Music furnished for weddings, receptions, 

entertainments, etc. 

21 North Tejon. 



Office Phone 509-B 



Resioence Phone Red S7I 



DR. HARRY L. MOREHOUSE 



DENTIST 



Hours 9-12, 1:30-5 



rirst Ndt'l Bank BIdg., room 8 



C. f . Arcularius & Co. 
niewelers 

Diamonds and Watches 

Fine Jewelry Manufacturing; 

9 South Tejon St. Coiorado Springs 

The 

Crissey & Fowler Lumber 
Company 

Phone 101 117 to 123 West Vermijo Ave. 

Phone 540 

Monarch Hand 
Laundry 

421 S. Tejon 

KARL L. MOHLER, Prop. 
W. J. WXLLRICH, College Agt. 

WE LaUIVDER aNYTHIlVG 

FINE CHOCOLATE BON RONS 



mK^ 



Name on every Piece 

Ice Cream, Hot and Cold 

Sodas 

Fresh Candies made exery hour 



UNION ICE AND COAL COMPANY 

W. M. BANNING, Prop. 



Coal, lUocd and Tec 

Dealers in all kinds of Coal and Artificial and 
Natural Ice 

Ya-dOffice, 105 W. Vermijo Ave. City Office, 5 N. Tejon 



JOHN MOF^FAT 

Tine Catloring 

Repairing, CJeaninu, Piessing. Special rates to 

College Students 
Over Waiting's Book Store ' 16 South Tejon St 




Carriages, Cabs, 

'Busses, Baggage and 

Transfer Wagons 

Office, 15 North eascade 



Denver Law School 

Law Department of the 
University of Denver 

Three years' course leading to the degree of 
Bachelor of Laws. Courses in Mining and Irri- 
gation Law. Full resident faculty. For informa- 
tion address 

LUCIIS W. HOYT, Dean 

Ernest & Cranmer BIdg., Denver, Colo. 



Did You Know 

That our stock of package crackers is so 
great in its variety that .you could have a 
change for every day for more than two 
months and yet not exhaust our list? Well, 
it's a fact. We have a kind for every pos- 
sible time cTud occasion— and tliey are all 
good. Finest bakery goods in the city. 
Fa cy Groceries 

W. N. BURGESS, 112 N. Tejon St. 

Titsworth & Davidson 
DAIRY 

2 MILES S. E OF ( QLORADO SPRINGS. P. 0. BOX b 



The Houck-Davidson Coal and Transfer Co, 

Dkalkks In 

CANON CITY, MAITLAND 

AND LIGNITE COAL 

Phone 473-B. Office US N. Tejon. P. O. Box 257 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

I See 

♦ 

J 24 E. Kiowa St. 



♦ ♦♦ 



♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦4*4*4'4*4'«i><i>«l»4'4'4i*i>4*4'4'«4»<»«*i'4>4'-l> 



^Ae Gowdy-SinnmonLS Printing Company 

FOR WINDOW CARDS, TICKETS, ETC. ENGRAVED 
CARDS AND INVITATIONS ON SHORT NOTICE 



2/ ^oriA ♦ 
Tje/on c5V. 4 



YEB WIIVO 

eniNESB AND JAPANESE 
FANCY GOODS 



Colorado Springs, Colo. 



THE DERN TEA AND COFFEE CO, ♦ 

Dealers in TEAS, COFFEES, SPICES, * 

EXTRACTS, BAKING POWDERS, Etc. * 

Phone 575 29 S. Tejon St. t 



4» 



The People's Grocery and Matket 



PHONE MAIN 868 




♦ S.JAMES & SON, Props. 



222 EAST PIKE'S PEAK 



Colorado Springs, Colorado 



4» 



ST. JOHN & BARNES 

Oldest and largest plumbing and heating 

establishment in city. Your 

patronage solicited 



Telephone 13 



206 N. Tejon St. 



Phone Main 151 



Established 1897 



D. W. SMITH 

FAMILY GROCER, TEA AND 
COFFEE MERCHANT . : : : : 
Orders Called for and Promptly Delivered 

731 N. Weber St. Colorado Springs, Colo. 



Wa^lsen 



R.ol>ix\soi:i 
Roxise 



A Quartette of Coals you can't beat 
for furnace, heater or cook Stove 

Sold Only by 

The Colorado Springs 

Fuel Co. "At the sign of the Red Men." 



For goodness Sake^^ 

Use TUDOR lower vein Coal 
It beats all other Lignite 

TUDOR COAL COMPANY, Cor. Cascade and Cucharas 

(Ask your dealer for 

VICTOR 



Athletic 
Supplies 




THE SCOTT SUPPLY and 
TOOL COMPANY 



Tools 
Machinery 



r725-3l Blake St, 




Supplies of ♦ 
all kinds ♦ 

Denver, Colo. ♦ 



♦ USE ELECTRIC LIGHT 

♦ IN YOUR HOMES 



The Colorado Springs Electric Co. : 



♦ ♦♦•^♦♦♦♦♦il>«» 1^ 4i 41 4i « «4» ♦ 4» ♦ 



♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦'^♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦^ 



♦ The Yovfig Meim^s Store* ♦ 

♦ ♦ 



♦ 



Fall Suits of Merit 



OVR ME/f'^ VESIG/f^ 

for young men are proving very popular among College 
men. Our efforts this season have been bent towards 
giving young men equally as good stlyes as those worn 
by College men of the East. 



SPECIAL DISCOUNT 
TO ALL STUDENTS 



HOLBROOK & PERKINS 



THE DENVER EIRE CLAY CO. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 
AND DEALERS IN 



♦ 
4 
♦ 

♦ 
♦ 



I Chemical and Physicial Apparatus and Chemicals I 



A FULL LINE OF UBORATORY SUPPLIES AND ASSAY GOODS 
Write for Illustrated Catalogues 



X 1742-1746 Champa Street, 



DENVER, COLORADO I 

♦ 



3C^ 



d^ 



u^hotoffraphs 



at BINGHAM & WOOD'S. 18 S. Tejon « 



^ H. C COLBURN, Pies. 



E. A. COLBURN, Jr., Scc'y and Tteas. ^ 



The ^yintler^s ^ytuiomobile Co. 
■"liveicy, storage, repairing 

Telephone Main 122 S-IO J>f. ffe^Xida At>e. Colorado Spring-t, Colo, 



^ 



O. E HEMENWAY 



Groceries and Meats 



\\5 South Tcjon St. 
Colorado Springs^ Colorado 



^ 






IM TIGER 



Colorado College 




: Special Rates to Students 

t On Rented Pianos 



4* 

♦ 

♦ 
4* 
4^ 
4» 

4* 
4* 
♦ 
4* 

♦ 
4* 
♦ 




The KNIGHT ^eHMPBELL 
Music eompany 



New Lennox Block 



Gpposite North Park 



St. John Bros-r"'"'™'"' 

Gas and Steam Fitters 

Hot Water Heating a Specialty 

Prompt attention given to Repair Work. 

eurtis 6oal 6o. 



Office 132 N. Tejon St. Telephone 91. 

Try "NEW RANGE" for the Kitchen, I4.00. 
BITUMNOUS COAL AT STANDARD PRICES. 

SELDOMRIDGE BROTHERS, 

Wliofesale and Retail Dealers in 

Fiour, Feed, Grain, Hay and Seeds 

108 South Tejon Street 

Bepairing while You Wait Satisfaction Guaranteed 

A complete plant of New Machinery for 
the Manufacture of Fine Boots and Shoes 

The Lightning Shoe Shop 

BROWN & COMPANY 
We make a specialty of Shoes to Measure and Shoes for 
Cripples. 28^/4 North Tejon St. Colorado Spbings 

Visiting Cards in Latest Styles. 



WE SHOW 
¥00. 



By advertising in THE TIGER that we 
appreciate your custom. 

22 E. Kiowa St. The Proiupt Printery 
The 



Hassell Iron Works Co. 



Founders and Machinists 



********************** 

CKristrndLS 

Pli/i4/ic Artistic in Posing, 
t llUlUa Lighting and Finish 

Discount to Students 




A^ggT^fiagy 



Phone 679-a 
Corner Cascade and Kiowa 



COLLEGE GOWNS, CAPS 

The Best Workmanship 
at Lowest Prices 

Silk Faculty Gowns and Hoods 



COX SONS & VINING 

262 Fourth Avenue., NEW YORK 




F00T BALLS 

Pants, Nose Guards, 
Tennis Goods 
and Sweaters 



at Strangs 

119 North Teion Street 



Mueth's 

Soda, Ice eream 

eATERING 

CHAS. T. FERTIG 

^Jea/ Estate, Loans and Insurance 

29 N. Tcjon Street 

TjAe Colorado Spr/nffs S^iorai Co, 

FLORISTS 



70-^ ^#»-/>» ZTm/am Sit^mt 



♦ 

* 



♦ 

♦ Phone 556-B „, ^ , 

♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦4 



DOVGLrAS est HETHSICINGTON 

^rchitecf^: 

Rooms 15-16 Outwest Building, Colorado Springs, Colo. 



THE TIGER 



Student's Book Store Books, stationery; aH Engi- 

neer's Supplies; College Pins 



and Watch Fobs, 
and up. 



Century Fountain Pens $1 to $4, Waterman's $2.50 

REYER & PLATT. 



For $1 00 D6r month ' ^"'^ Sponged and Pressed each week 

— ^ 1- PANTATORIUM. 

17 East Bijou, Branch Office opp. Plaza Hotel. 



THE COLORADO SPRINGS CO, 

The Original Locators of 

Colorado Springs and 9/^aniiou 

is still offering for sale choice 
lots on North Weber Street 
and North Wahsatch Avenue 

Also lots for sale in other parts of Colorado Springs 
and in Manitou 

Apply at ROOMS, OUTWEST BUILDING 



LOUIS ST©eK steam aye and Cleaning 

Office and Works, 1 15 N. Tcion St. 

TELEPHONE 517-B 

Cleaning, Dyeing, Scouring in all its branches 

Ostrich Plumes Cleaned, Dyed and Curled 

Kid Gloves Dyed and Cleaned. 



: GIDDINGS BROS, 



Fine dress Goods and Ladies' 
TAILOR Suits, Ladies' 
Furnishings 



Kiowa and Tejon Streets. 



We do Everything in the Tailoring 
Line 

J. B. CORRIN 

103 E. Bijou St. COLORADO SPRINGS, COLO. 

D. E, MONROE & CO. 
Prescription Druggist 

The best of Drugs, Stationery and Toilet Articles 

NO LIQUORS SOLD. 
eon Teion Sf Biiou Phone 311 S( 331 

THE HEFLEY-ARCILARIIS DRUG CO. 
Druddists 

Kodaks, Cameras and all kinds of Photographic 
Supplies. Developing and Printing for Amatuers. 
Free Delivery. 
Phone 144 21 South Tejon Street 



liardivare Bicycles 

a. S. BLHKE 

New Chainless Bicycle $35 and $20 
Rambler, Orient and National Automobiles 



Best Kepair Shop in city 



107 n. Ccion 



lUrs* B* R» brooks 

Coilet Parlors at 20 East Kiowa 

Also Room 52, Antlers Hotel 

No Apprentices. Only experienced help employed. 

A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 

Largest Mapufacturers in the World of Official 
Athletic Supplies 

BASE BALL, BASKET BALL, GOLE, BOXING GLOVES, 
STRIKING B\GS, GYMNASIUM GOODS. 

Spalding's Trade Mark goods are the acme of perfection; 
accept no goods that are not the Spalding kind ; there is no 
substitute for a Spalding article. 

Every base ball manager should send at once for a copy 
of Spalding's Spring and Summer Catalogue, It's free. 

Spalding's Athletic Almanac for 1905. Price 10 Cts. 
per copy 

A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 

New York, Chicago, Deneer San Francisco, St. Louis 

"henrytamm 

Druggist 

PRESCRIPTIONS 
TOILET ARTICLES 
STATIONERY 

All Popular Drinks Served 
at our Soda Fountain 

Plaza Hotel, Cor. Cache la Poudre & Tejon Sts. 

THE RlIGBY=PRIMROSE COAL CO. 

m\ Kinds of Fuel 

Phone 481-A West 44-A 21 N. TEJON ST. 



H.KRHNZ 



PORBELaiN 

H. KRHNZ & 



Only 8 Chair Barber Shop in the City 

lOOH B. Pike's Peak aye. 



BHTH TUBS F. R. SMITH 

e©., Barbers 

Try the \ lectric Vibrassage Machine 
eOLORADO SPRINGS. COLO. 



THE TIGER. 



FITS 



CORRECTLY 



COPraiQHTED 

It Saves You Money and Time 

When I examine your eyes or fit your glasses. My NEW 
METHOD is perfection beyond a doubt. Consultation 
Free. DR. SCHADT, O. D. 

Eyesight Specialist. 
Office 303 Colorado Bldg., cor. Tejon and Huerfano 

Use Gas 



We sell a GOOD FOUNTAIN PEN for $i 

WHITNEY & GRIMWOOD 

Opera House Building 

We are agents for WATERMAN'S IDEAL FOUNTAIN 
Pens. Prices from $2.50 up. 



^red S. J^aj/ner 

Watchmaker and Jeweler 

15 South TJejon St. 




AND 




1739 Champa St., DENVER, COLO, 



C. W. WARSOP & CO.. 



206 N. Tejon St, 



Draperies, Upholstery Goods, Furniture. Complete line of Screens, 
Pillows, Pillow Tops, Couch Covers, etc. 



The 50-mile-an-hour Wheel 


THE CRESCENT 


Reading Standard Bicycles 

SaEFF & KI6(iS Opposite Plaza Hotel 


BOWLING ALLEYS 

113-117 North Cascade Ave. 


SPer/ci'ns Croc/cery Co, 

F. A. PERKINS, Manager 

/20 ^. -Uejon St. 


Telephone Main 863 
E. S. SOLLENBERGER, Mgr. 

Private Alleys for Ladies 
Eight Alleys on one Floor 
Special Rates to Parties and Clubs 


FRANK F. CRIMP 

FLORIST 

Phone 500 509 E. Columbia St. 

Special attention given to Telephone Orders. 


H. E. BOATRIGHT 

iPublic Stenoffrap/ier 

33 GIDDINGS BLDG. 

Rates 5c per 100 words, 50c per hr. extra carbons 5c per page 



PHOTOGRAPHS at Pop«Iar Prices 

at MERRICK'S, 30 SOUTH TEJON ST. 

If you want to give pictures to college friends it will not be so expensive if you have your work done here. 



FRANK H. SMALL watches, Diamonds, fine Watch Work. Special 
Jeweler and Silversmith P^*^^ to Students. 113 Pike's Peak Ave. 



Vol. VII. 



Vhe TIGCIt 



COLORADO COLLEGE, DECEMBER 8, 1904. 



No. 13 




t f4f4f^ f^ ^0^f4F^f4f^l^F^ 



ATHLETIC 
DEPARTMENT 



TRAINING AT YALE 



The training table for athletic teams serves 
two most important purposes. First, if properly 
conducted, it provides nourishing, muscle build- 
ing food, and this food is properly cooked. 

If either or both of these requirements are 
absent, there is no team and no individual who 
can enter a strenuous contest and successfully 
compete against men made physically fit by suit-' 
able food. 

It is the custom for boys' at College to scatter 
among boarding houses and boarding clubs. 
They get all kinds of food prepared in all kinds 
of ways. Hot breads for supper, fried meats 
for breakfast, and pastry possibly at both meals. 

One boy who is fond of coffee may take two 
or three cups at a meal. Another coming fresh 
from exercise may drink four or five glasses of 
water upon sitting down to supper. It is safe 
to say that not one boy in fifty so situated can 
possibly be put in prime condition for any com- 
petitive contest. He has little knowledge him- 
self of what his diet should be, and if he had, in 
most cases, he can not find a suitable diet in any 
ordinaiy boarding house. 

I do not mean that by intelligence and self- 
denial, much can not be done with any boarding 
l.r>use fare — but far more can be done to condi- 
tion college boys where the pantry and the 
kitchen are both absolutely under control of the 
Captain and Coach, and where they can enforce 
'be self-denial which seems so burdensome to 
the inexperienced young athlete. 

It is not merely that good food makes good 
blood, bur it makes good nerves. We hear much 
v^f this man or that man "going to pieces" at crit- 
ical times. We hear nothing of the scores of men 



V hose nerves don't crack under strain A mighty 
factor in this good nerve is the perfect condition 
bi ought about by good nourishment and regular 
1-1 eep. 

The second impo^i ,nt use of a training t;ib!c 
IS that candidates for a team are in constant 
touch with the Captain and Coaches. In this 
alone is justification for the training table, for 
in no ( ther way is it practicable to get 'complete 
union jnd co-operation. In these hours to- 
L;ethcr 'he fine points of a game can be studied 
3V(' i' i-ght. The faults of men and in team 
play can be criticised and w^ys poin'cd out of 
C3rre' ":on. 

Team unity and morale can be built 'jp to an 
extent w^ least equal to what is done in time of 
• ctual play. It is at these times th^t College 
"^raditions for grit and loyalty are soaked in n\ 
younger members, and when all the en'^ronment 
is preitnt for passing down those ide.'t^ and poli- 
cies which, taken together, constitute su'i a con- 
sistent school and method as are lar^-ciy ac- 
countable for the football and rowing which 
have made Yale generally successful ni these 
brartches of sport. 

Without these fixed principles, more or less 
stable from year to year, no branch of sport can 
be consistently good year in and year out. A 
good baseball team becomes an accident due to 
a brilliant player or two. but without any capacity 
ir. its members to repeat its success the follow- 
ing year. 

For* these reasons above briefly stated, I am 
most firmly of opinion that the training table 
must be a controlling factor in successful inter- 
college sport. 



THE TIGER 



THE FRESHMAN-SOPHOMORE FOOT- 
BALL GAME. . 

In a game replete with spectacular features and 
abounding in nerve-thrilling end runs, and line 
plunging of the fiercest order, the hard charging 
giants of the Class of 1907 galloped to victory 
over the stalwart gladiators representing 1908, 
to the tune of 12-0, the Freshmen fighting des- 
perately every inch of the way. It was ladies' 
day on Washburn Field, and long before the time 
for the kick off the stands were filled to over- 
flowing, and the overflow had crowded upon the 
side lines. The boxes were filled wath the elite 
o; the city and the Faculty of the College. The 
game was full of interest to the spectator, and 
the Freshmen are to be congratulated upon the 
niagnificent defense they exhibited against the 
marvelous formations and desperate plunges 
which the Sophs repeatedly hurled against them. 

Amid the hushed expectancy of the crowd of 
supporters of each team, the Freshmen lined up 
their doughty warriors for the kick off, and 
amid breathless suspense Referee Frost blew^ the 
wdiistle and Captain Vandemoer of the Fresh- 
men charged fiercely at the recumbent oval and 
^vifh a swing of his mighty leg booted the leather 
fully 20 yards into the territory of the Sopho- 
mores. At this juncture Seybold, the wizardlike 
halfback of the Sophomores, arrived at the 
ground, and amid the wildest enthusiasm, amount- 
ing almost to an ovation, took his place among 
the defenders of 1907. 

Seybold advanced the ball 5 yards for 07, and 
Fisk, tucking the ball safely under one arm, gal- 
loped around the -end, Seybold heading a strong 
interference. After running in splendid form 
Seybold was informed that Fisk had been downed. 
Seybold evinced some slight surprise and pain 
a»- this intelligence, but was not heard to make 
any comment. 

The Freshmen, finally, by the exercise of most 
herculean efforts, successfully withstood the 
seemingly irresistible offense of the Sophomores, 
forcing them to kick. 

The ball was passed to Captain Leuchtenburg, 
his leg swung in a mighty arc and meeting the 
leather with a sharp impact slammed the pigskin 
high over the heads of the onrushing Freshmen 
to the Freshmen quarter, who w^as quickly downed 
by the speedy Sophomore ends. 

Lennox and Morgan, the bright particular stars 
in the Freshman galaxy, ploughed through the 
Soph line for gains, using the utmost care to 
handle the Sophs as gently as possible in the 
process. Referee Frost, amid wild cheering, ad- 
vanced the ball 5 .yards for the Freshmen, but the 
whistle soon blew, and the first half of the 
nerve racking contest was at an end, with the 



ball near the middle of the field, neither side hav 
ing scored. 

In the second half the play was if possible more 
fierce and rapid than that of the first. 

Captain Leuchtenburg kicked off for the Sophs, 
and the Freshmen, rallying magnificently, 
ploughed up the field for steady gains, but were 
finally forced to kick. The Sophs, rudely bru.sh- 
ing aside the Freshmen lines, blocked the long 
punt which Vandemoer was about to get off, Lake 
nabbing the leather after it had gone out of 
bounds. 

The Sophs now began their triumphant march 
to victory. Seybold, Fisk and Scibird alternated 
in rushing the ball through the various holes 
which the hard charging Soph line tore in the 
Freshman aggregation, and finally Fisk was 
shoved over f o r a t ouchdown, Leuchtenburg 
kicking goal. 

The Sophs now seemed to get in the game with 
a dash and fierceness, and although there re- 
mained but five minutes to play, the Sophomores 
charged through the rapidly weakening lines of 
the Freshmen, who made a courteous and lady- 
like resistance, until Seybold galloped over the 
line for the second touchdown amid wild cheer- 
ing and the shouts of his colleagues from Mis- 
souri. Leuchtenburg kicked goal, and the great 
game was history — the score standing 12-0 for 
the Sophs. 

Managers McClintock and McCreery are still 
trying to count the receipts from this record- 
breaking attendance. It has been surmised that 
as a result of this game many imporant changes 
will have to be made in the all-Colorado team. 
Lovewell should undoubtedly replace Foley of 
D. U. at center, and Steffa, Middleswortli, Blunt. 
French and many others are all entitled to places. 
Leuchtenburg outpunted Rush Sill of the Mines. 
and at end Reeks was found to be far faster and 
shiftier than Captain Lennox. At running the 
team and directing play, Steinmetz of the Fresh- 
man team is the superior of Owens of Boulder. 
Coach Mack of the Sophomores is to be con- 
gratulated upon the excellent team work he has 
developed. Particular mention should be made of 
the magnificent and ladylike playing of "Right 
Guard Burnett of the Freshmen. His peculiar 
.and rapid parachute charging attracted much 
favorable comment. Burnett should displace 

Karnopf of Boulder as guard. 



Young Masher (to conductor) — Is this Noah's 
irk full yet? 
Conductor— Yes. all Init the monkey. Jump in. 

Lives of great men all remind us, 
When to die it comes our turn, 

He quite sure, not leave behind us 
Letters that 'tis best to burn. 



THE flCMR 



A GREATER ENDOWMENT. 

The Trustees of Colorado College at a meet- 
ing just held have taken the public into their 
confidence, and announce that the College must 
have a half million of dollars added to its en- 
dowment in order to carry on its work to the 
best advantage. The following is a resume of 
President Slocum's report, which was adopted 
h\- the Board of Trustees. Colorado College was 
founded in 1874, when Colorado was still a terri- 
Utvy. Less than twenty years ago the income of 
the small endowment held by the College did not 
pay interest on the debt ; the few students drawn 
from the city of Colorado Springs were nearly 
al! in the Academy; there was only one building, 
:uid tliat small and poorly planned. Now the 
College has eleven stone buildings, and about one 
and a half million dollars have been invested in 
grounds, buildings, and equipment. East year 
forty-four baccalaureate degrees were granted, 
and there are one hundred and fourteen in this 
year's Freshman Class. The new Science build- 
ing: is probably the best structure of the sort in 
the West. 

But the present endowment fund of the Col- 
lege is less than $400,000, and this brings in a 
little over $20,000 a year. The College receives 
about $15,000 a^ year from tuition f ees, , and it 
spends, exclusive of the School of Engineering, 
not less than $55,000 a year, though most eco- 
nomically administered. The annual deficit of 
about $20,000 is met by contributions from friends 
of the College ; but many of the former friends 
of the College have passed away, and each year it 
is more difficult to meet expenses. It is gen- 
erall thought that Colorado College has all the 
m®ney it needs, and that President Slocum has 
only to ask in order to receive. The fact is that 
the College needs more funds badly in order 'to 
carry on its work to the best advantage, and 
th( money is very hard to get. Colorado Col- 
lege is free from political and denominational 
control, and it has never cost the taxpayers of 
the state a cent. With ample endowment funds 
it can do a noble work in the state, and the 
Board of Trustees appeals to the public-spirited 
men of Colorado to give their support to the 
movement to add $500,000 to the endowment fund 
of the College, believing that, in the interests of 
the state and the nation, the money could not be 
better invested. 



at a reasonable rate. At first, the young ladies 
displayed a slight tendency to hang on to their 
money, but the merchants were cold-hearted, and 
.refused to be "jewed" down. However, the woe- . 
begone, hungry look of Organgrinder Williams 
opened up their pocketbooks a little, anl from 
then on the money came easier. The success with 
which they bucked the skin game of Grafters 
Reyer and Randolph is circumstantial evidence to 
the fact that they have seen like propositions be- 
fore. They also displayed an unlooked.for knowl- 
edge in playing the roulette wheel operated by 
Gaml)ler Willis, and more fortunes were won 
than lost in his place of business. Bortree and 
Fmger, the pawnbrokers, easily disposed of their 
gold watches and diamond ear-rings to the more 
vain purchasers. The art store of Mr. Thomas 
made its share of the gains, but the proprietor 
says that his profits were cut in half by the loss 
(M a valuable painting \Nhich was stolen by some 
shoplifter during the evening. The perfumed 
hair tonic, on sale at Givens' novelty store, was 
\ery popular, and went like hot cakes. Mr. 
Tucker's ribbon display was very beautiful and 
costly. "Spieler" Fawcett opened up in opposi- 
tion to the vaudeville and captured all the patron- 
age that the latter usually enjoyed. Mr. Willis 
tried to make good his gambling losses by the 
introduction of some new fake game, but he 
"shocked" the young ladies so badly that the 
police put a stop to the performance. However, 
a few managed to sneak in by the side door and 
learned the secret of the game. Auctioneer 
Shaw then proceeded with the auction of the 
boys' hats. At times the young ladies became 
frantic in their endeavors to outbid one an- 
other, and even went so far as to pawn their 
diamonds. A 98-cent cap often brought as high 
a.-^ $1,800. The distribution of refreshments was 
run on a business basis. It was no free lunch 
scheme, but was operated strictly on the Euro- 
pean plan, and you paid for what you ate. The 
girls of the class agree that, on the whole, prices 
were reasonable, goods were of the best quality, 
and the clerks were always obliging. The boys 
think the party was a money-making scheme and 
an all around good business investment. 



JUNIOR PARTY. 

The Junior boys entertained the girls of the 
class at a mock fair, given in Ticknor Study last 
Wednesday night. Anything from a new silk 
dress to a ticket to the side show could be bought 



FREE LECTURE. 

This CNening in Perkins Auditorium,- Prof. 
Craig of the University of Michigan will lecture 
on "The Discovery and Decipherment of the 
Cuneiform Inscriptions of Persepolis and Baby 
Ion." The lecture is illustrated by excelleni 
slereopticon slides. Prof. Craig's treatment of 
the subject is popular, and his subject is one of 
great interest. All students especially invited to 
be present. 



THE TIGER. 



THE TIGER, 

Published weekly during the College year by 
The Tiger Publishing Co., in the interest of Colo- 
rado College. 

J. Y. Crothers Editor-in-Chief 

T. Hunter Assistant Editor-in-Chief 

J. I. Muf fley Athletic Editor 

Miriam Carpenter Literary Editor 

Mabel Barbee Alumni Editor 

A. H. Fisher Local Editor 

Bert Wasley Business Manager 

C. A. Hedblom Assistant Business Manager 

CORRESPONDENTS: 

Mr. Nash, Miss McDowell, Miss Isham, Miss 
Kidder, Mr. Lamb, Mr. Reeks, Miss Arbuckle. 

Subscription, $1.25 per year, payable in advance. 
Single copy, 5 cents. 

The Tiger is forwarded to all subscribers until 
ordered discontinued and all arrearanges are paid. 

Students, Professors and Alumni are invited 
to contribute literary articles, personals and items. 
Contributions must be accompanied by the writer's 
name. 

Address all communications to The Tiger, 
Colorado College, Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Entered at the Postoffice at Colorado Springs, 
Colo., as second-class matter. 



Patronize Tiger Advertisers 



EDITORIAL 



THE LEADER. 



\A/E are indebted to the kindness of Mr. P. B. 
Stewart for the article on "Training at 
Yale," which was requested that the students may 
know what training is, and what it does. Our 
success in athletics in the future depends much 
on the training of the men, and the sentiment of 
the student body should be such that it would be 
impossible for a man on the team to break train- 
ing during the season. Mr. Stewart has always 
shown a great interest in our athletics, especially 
giving of his valuable time to the coaching of 
the baseball team. The students feel very grate- 
ful to Mr. Stewart for his help in the past. 



ADVERTISE THE COLLEGE. 

"THE best time to work for new students for 
next year is during the Christmas holidays. 
Everyone is in a good humor at that time, and 
not in a frame of mind to contradict what you 
may say in praise of your own College. Do not 



urge every High School youth to come to Col- 
orado College. We would rather have our insti- 
tution remain more famous for the quality than 
foi the quantity of its students. Remember that 
Colorado College wants the best products of the 
High Schools. You need not be ashamed of the 
facilities offered by the "oldest institution of high- 
er education in the West." At present we make 
no "splurge" over new buildings, for the energies 
of the Board of Trustees are concentrated now 
upon a much needed increase in the endowment 
fund. As to the opportunities offered engineer- 
ing students, we can say more next week. The 
equipment of the College of Liberal Arts is prob- 
ably without a superior in the state. The labora- 
tories of Palmer Hall will be sufficient for the 
College for years to come, unless there is a -jcry 
great increase in the number of students. The 
apparatus is fine enough to enable anyone to put 
forth his best efforts in experimentation. The 
Museum, we are told on good authority (that 
of a man not connected with Colorado College), 
ic the best in seven states — the other six mentioned 
were east of us. Valuable gifts of appartus and 
books are being made to the ^College almost every 
day. If anyone should be unkind enough to men- 
tion athletics to you, tell him that we raised the 
debt on the Athletic Association this year, and we 
are going in to win hereafter ; also that some day 
we will boast a good Gymnasium, when athletics 
will go on the boom. Already we have the best 
collegiate athletic field in the state. 



THE COLLEGE CALENDAR. 

FOR many years the College has needed some 
souvenir which students could take home 
with them at Christmas to show their friend's 
what we are. In the summer vacation we have 
the Pike's Peak Nugget, and at the spring vaca- 
tion the College Bulletin, but until last year there 
was nothing to show at Christmas — and even in 
Colorado people have "to be showed" — to talk up 
the College is not enough. The Calendar will 
make an inexpensive yet suitable present to any 
of your friends,- and will do as much as any other 
one thing to bring the right people to Colorado 
College — if you do your part in purchasing some 
and giving them away. The views of campus, 
buildings and students are well chosen, and fin- 
ished in good shape. It is certainly worth the 
price of admission. 



THE ETHICAL ADDRESS. 

Last Friday morning President Slocum spoke 
of the new religious movement going on in our 
city. We as a College ought to be a part of this 
movement. Whose fault is it, if we are not in- 



THB TIGER. 



terested in revivals like this, which have inter- 
ested the greatest of great men? The thought of 
God, and of the tie that binds us to God has 
awakened great men in the past. So, if we are 
not interested and awakened, is it the fault of 
God, or the fault of truth? In our jDwn Chapel 
service, whose fault is it if we are not moved 
by the singing of a hymn or the reading of a 
Psalm ? Whose fault is it if we are not stirred by 
the act of prayer? In the past, people have been 
impressed and benefited by services like these. 
Isn't it our own fault if we, likewise, are not im- 
pressed, and as a result we go out into the world 
with one side of our lives undeveloped? Since 
it is our fault, are we going to let ourselves be 
unmoved by this, the greatest of all ideas — the 
idea that has made the greatness of all great 
men? Rather, let us take this idea with us out 
into the world. Here in College let us make 
the most of these weeks of great religious move- 
ment. Let us think upon this problem. Let us 
be thoughtful. Life is too beautiful and serious 
not to do this. 



THE COLORADO COLLEGE CALENDAR. 

The 1905 Calendar has arrived. It is dis- 
tinctly original, artistic and representative. As 
it lies here before us, damp from the press, the 
eye dwells with pleasure on every detail. In gen- 
eral plan it closely resembles the Calendar of last 
year, but is an improvement upon it. The cover, 
for example, is simpler, with less printing, and 
i> more artistic in effect. Beside a very good 
College seal in colors and the title, it beat's two 
fine half-tone engravings, one of President Slo- 
cum, the other of Palmer Hall. It is very fit- 
ting that the man who made the College and its 
finest building should appear here together. 

The scheme of College colors is carried through 
the entire Calendar, which is composed of seven 
pages. Each of the six pages within presents, 
upon an attractive orange background, three half- 
tone engravings of College scenes. The artistic 
point of view selected in each of the Campus 
scenes is especially to be commended, and we 
feel that all will agree that no better pictures of 
the College have ever been printed. Not only 
art all the buildings of importance represented, 
bu*: there is also life in the pictures, which is to 
be commended. Photographs of College build- 
ings without students in sight are not very inter- 
esting. The photographer has realized this, and 
the buildings, instead of appearing deserted, stand 
as attractive backgrounds to the scenes of Com- 
mencement. Among other pictures is an inter- 
esting group of the Faculty. We believe the 
members of the Faculty haev never been photo- 
graphed together before. 



Finally, be it said that the Calendar repre- 
sents the best of our College life and that all who 
jirc interested in the advancement of the insti- 
tution are indebted to Mr. DeWitt for so care- 
fully selecting and taking the pictures and in 
pioducing such an attractive and tasteful sou- 
venir. All should take an early opportunity of 
showing their appreciation by securing one at the 
College Book Store. 



FRESHMAN-SOPHOMORE CONTEST. 

Come out, one and all, next Tuesday night and 
pack the house. Seats are free. The list of 
speakers and speeches is below. Exciting sub- 
jects, aren't they. Surely you will want to hear 
the ringing words of Patrick Henry and hear 
Benedict Arnold shout "Saratoga is won !" There 
i.-^ exciting gun-play m "The Parson of Cactus 
Flats," and "The Last Ditch" will command your 
attention. Ihere are tears in "The Heart of Old 
Hickory" and "The Sign of the Cross," and in 
"The Bishop's Sin" there is tragedy. Regulus? 
Oh, surely you can't afford to miss hearing "Reg- 
ulus to the Carthagenians." There will be good 
music, and yelling, too, for the two classes con- 
tending will be there en masse and will back 
their men with some good substantial cheers. 

Here are the speakers and their declamations: 

Freshmen — A. E. Harper, "The Parson of Cac- 
tus Flats;" Mark Mohler, "An Appeal to Arms;" 
Martin Musser, "The "Black Horse and His 
Rider;" E. S. Stickney, "The Last Ditch." 

Sophomores — Sharon Lake, "The Heart of Old 
Hickory;" W. A. Bartlett, "The Sign of the 
Cross;" C. R. Kaull, "The Bishop's Sin;" Sey- 
bold, "Regulus to the Carthagenians." 



ALUMNI NOTES. 

Clara Hall, ex-'o5, was at the Utah game and 
and also at the reception given by the Utah stu- 
dtnts to the Tigers. 

Elizabeth Taylor, ex-'o4, traveling Secretary 
for the Colorado Y. W. C. A., has spent the last 
ten days in our midst. 

Robert D. Andrews, '00, is one of the firm of 
Andrews, Jaques & Rantoul, architects, of Bos- 
ton, which has just been commissioned to build 
a. Memorial Art building for Abbot Academy at 
Andover, Mass., the girls' school of which Dr. 
Daniel Merriman is at present President. This 
institution is the oldest girls' school in the coun- 
try. 

Leta Cutler, '01, is teaching in the Fountain 
School at Pueblo. 



8 



THH TiCBR. 



A letter from Earl Cooley, 'oo, states that the 
Class of 1900 is going to have a grand reunion 
this coming year. It is not known yet where this 
reunion will take place, but it is hoped that we 
may see all of 1900 here at Colorado College next 
June. Think about this, Alumni, and see to it 
that one class does not have more representa- 
tives than another. 

Rev. Arthur Holt, "98, is pastor of the First 
Congregational church of Pueblo. 

Earl C. Cleveland, ex-'o5, returned last Satur- 
day from Sonora, Mexico, where he has charge 
of an Eastern mining company's property. He 
left again Sunday for Toledo, Ohio, and other 
Eastern points. 

Blanche Atchison, '00, and Miss Barker, 'ex-'o5, 
are teaching in Gordon Academy, Salt Lake City. 
They entertained three of the team at tea and 
attended the game. 

Elbert Cumming, '99, is teaching at Eureka, 
Utah. He went 65 miles to see the Tigers play. 
That's the kind of spirit we like to see. 



TIGER NOTES. 

Did you see San Toy? 

The first good skating weather of the year. 
We hope it will stay for a while at least. 

The singles in the tennis tournament have now 
been played off, and the drawing for the dou- 
bles will be posted immediately. Get into the 
game and win one of the fine tennis racket cases 
given by Prof. Brehaut. 

The Pearsons Clubhouse is on the move. 

Xmas is "earning." 

Madame Zeissler, the noted pianist, will be 
heard in Perkins Hall on Saturday night. 



According to the agreement among the girls' 
societies, no Freshman girls will be pledged by 
any society before the first Friday in December. 
Those pledged by the different societies are ; 
• Minerva — Miss Anderson, Miss Crawford, Miss 
Weir, Miss Davis, Miss Warde, Miss Rice, Miss 
Estil, Miss Emery, Miss Stark, Miss McCreery, 
Mis Hall, Miss Strieby, Miss Mack. 

Contemporary — Miss Wagner, Miss Skinner, 
Miss Haynes, Miss Porter, Miss Lewis, Miss 
Trowbridge, Miss Sloane, Miss Freeman, Miss 
Guretzky, Miss Fowler, Miss Burchill. 

Hypatia — Miss Schaefer, Miss Bateman, Miss 
Thomas, Miss Whiton, Miss Weaver, Miss Pre- 
vGSt, Miss Murphy, Miss Ball, Miss Gilland. 

Parsons and Nash had their final "go-to-it" 
on Friday afternoon, starting in with 6-2 in favor 
of Nash and 5-3 in favor of Parsons on the sec- 
ond set. Nash took four straight games, thus 
winning the match, 6-2, 7-5, and incidentally 
the tournament. The first prize is a handsome 
Spaulding tennis racket offered by the Strang 
Sporting Goods Co., and goes to Nash, while the 
second prize, a sweater from Mr. Whaite's cloth- 
ing store, "one of Whaite's Best," goes to Prof. 
Parsons. 

Owing to the fact that Thomas Jefferson will 
be at the opera house December 10, the Minerva 
Candy Fair has been postponed until shortly 
after Christmas. 

The W. E. girls had a Welsh rarebit spread 
Saturday night. 

A doll show was held at Ticknor Thursday. 
Admittance, 2 cents. 

The cold weather prevented a large crowd at 
the Sophomore-Freshman football game. 

Everybody is taking a long breath. The "first 
of December" is past. 

Chapel was unusually interesting one day last 
week. 



Where, oh where are the verdant Freshmen? 

Mr. and Mrs. Ruger gave a candlelight party to 
the boys and "bachellor" Professors who attended 
the performance of "San Toy" on Saturday night. 
Peanuts, popcorn, apples and a rehearsal of all 
the best jokes were served in the line of refresh- 
ments. 

Miss Fezer will soon begin her famous lec- 
tt^]fes- ,on "Domestic Science." Special rates to 
College students. 



The President of the Sat-on-Family is to en- 
tertain the other members of the Family at a 
banquet Thursday evening. 

A number of the upper class girls have fcnmed 
a "No Knockers' Club," and anyone who 
"knocks" is promptly fined a penny. 

The great debate comes the first Friday after 
vacation. Keyes, Hunter and Lake will uphold 
the honor of Apollo, while Hall, Givens and Rob- 
erts will do likewise for Pearsons. 



THE TIGER 



Mrs. McGuire chaperoned a jolly crowd of 
girls to see "San Toy" at the opera house Satur- 
day night. 

Miss Mary Smith was a guest of the Phoedus 
Cluh for dinner Sunday. 



Miss Kidder entertained a few of the new Con- 
temporary girls at a fudge party Friday evening. 

Miss West entertained a few of the Hall girls 
most informally- at a chocolate party Monday 
evening. 



The girls in McGregor were greatly shocked 
and overcome upon the morning of December 4 
to see a yellow "smallpox" flag hanging from the 
room of one of the most popular Freshman girls. 
Their fears were quickly allayed, however, for 
it proved to be a "false alarm," and the two 
patients after careful nursing are now as well 
and charming as ever. 

A number of College students enjoyed the spe- 
cial music at St. Stephens' vespers Sunday even- 
ing. 

Contemporary will give up her meeting Friday 
afternoon to the initiation and welcoming of 
her new members. 



Miss Taylor gave a most helpful talk to the 
Juniors and Freshmen at their prayer meeting 
Sunday night. 

The Pedagogy Class would understand chil- 
dren if it studied itself thoroughly. .Vsk Wasley. 

After the excitement of the past week, the girls 
are beginning to settle down to ordinary every- 
day existence again. 

The singing at the evangelistic services in the 
city is fine. If you hear it once, you'll want U) 
h.ear it again. It can't be beat. 

The new Calendar is out, and it's "all right." 



SOCIETIES AND ASSOCIATIONS 



APOLLONIAN CLUB. 

Paper, "Causes of Russia's Activity in the Far 

East" Hum 

Speech, "Japan's Rise Amono- World Powers" 

Steffa 

Paper, "Russian Commanders" Blunt 

M usic Quartet 

Paper, "Japanese Commanders" Kaull 

Debate, "Resolved, That Japan's stand against 
Russia is justifiable." 

Affirlnative Seybold, Redding 

Negative Hester, J. Vandemoer 



MINERVA. 



Program, December 9 : 
"Old Eaglish Christmas Customs". .Miss Welling 
"1 he Work of Dickens and Irving" . . . Miss Ela 
Song Miss Tuckerman 



PEARSONS LITERARY SOCIETY. 

"Historical Study of Biology" Hedblom 

"Bacteriology and Public Health" Bortree 

Song Currier 

"Evolution and Problems of Biology" .... Willis 
"Jacques Loeb and Research Work" Hall 



HYPATIA. 

Japan and Russia — 

"Peasant Life" Cornelia Ball 

"City Life" lone Montgomery 

"Student Life" Zaidee Zinn 

Music String Trio 

V. M. C. A. 

We had no outside speaker Sunday afternoon. 
Taking for our subject, "Various Childhood Be- 
liefs," the substance of the thoughts brought out 
\\- those present was : 

We all live, more or less, for some one else; 
cdl men "believe in this" altruism, and this spirit 
in Christ is one reason why we should believe in 
Hmi, and it is this that calls noble men to great 
and good causes. Then as we look about us in 
i-ature we cannot help seeing how everything 
goes to make a great and united whole ; this we 
cannot view without believing in an Orderer of 
it all — in a God. We all believe in the Trinity. 
but what is it? Is it three distinct individuals? 
It is three manifestations of the same individual. 
We have a friend who is an artist; on going into 
his studio we come to know him as an artist; 
then we know him as a friend, and on going into 
his home we come to know him as a father. He 
is not the same in any two of the above, yet he 
i,; the same man. So it is in the Trinity — we be- 
lieve in the Father, in the Son, and in the Holy 



16 



run fiGBR 



Ghost, yet they are all manifestations of God. 
We know this God as a Christlike God, as one in- 
terested in us, and we cannot believe in God with- 



out believing in a hereafter, and in doing ^11 in 
our power to fit men for the life beyond. Mr. 
Willis led the meeting. 



\^^f^f^4f^f^f4f^f^4f^f^f^4f^ 



ACADEMY DEPARTMENT 

Karle S. Alden Editor 

F . C. Merrill Athletic Editor 



CUTLER 22>, PUEBLO Y. M. C. A. 28. 

In spite of lack of hard and consistent practice, 
the showing made by our team at Pueblo Satur- 
day night was not by any means a disappoint- 
ment. The great lesson of the game for us is 
that only by consistent and scientific practice as 
a team will we be able to turn out an aggrega- 
tion of which Cutler can be proud. TTie indi- 
vidual playing of the fellows was all that could 
b'- desired, but through the fact that we could 
not get together we lost the game. The score 
was 14 to 13 in our favor at the end of the first 
half, after one of the prettiest exhibitions of bas- 
ketball ever seen in Pueblo. The playing of 
Ford on the Pueblo team is especially to be com- 
mended, while Moore was our praticular star, 
making eight out of the eleven field goals. When 
he has had more practice he will be one of the 
best forwards in the Academy. Out of fourteen 
free throws we got only one ; but for this we 
would have won the game. Howevei, the season 
is only started, and great improvement in this 
line may be looked for. A return game will be 
played some time in January, at which time we 
hope to turn the tables. 



HESPERIAN. 



"The first real conflict" was Mr. Brehaut's 
characterization of the debate last Friday night. 
There is no doubt of it ! If we can put up de- 
bates like the one listened to last Friday, the so- 
ciety will be able to make an excellent showing 
in an interscholastic debate this year. The ques- 
tion for debate was : "Resolved, That immigra- 
tion to the United States should be further re- 
stricted." The affirmative side was presented 
by Mitchell and Jameson, and the negative by 
Richardson and Haight. Mitchell was perhaps 
the most eloquent speaker of the evening, and 
distinguished himself also in his arrangement of 
his speech, which was very clear and easy to fol- 
low. Richardson showed most excellent prepara- 
tion and his matter was well handled, though 
he has much improvement to make in the matter 
of presentation. Jameson made his debate last 



Friday night. He had gone into his subject 
deeply, had his debate carefully outlined, and it 
fitted in especially well with that of his col- 
league. Haight handled his subject with his char- 
acteristic enthusiasm and wound up with a very 
fine appeal to the feelings of the judges. His 
argument, however, was not particularly strong. 
The decision of the judges was unanimous in 
fdvor of the affirmative. 

The other number on the program was a reci- 
tation by Leslie, which was well delivered, 
though the subject was not a particularly good 
one. This was Leslie's first appearance, and he 
made a very favorable impression. 

The program for next Friday night is posted. 
Visitors are cordially invited to attend the meet- 
ings of the society. 



SIGMA DANCE. 



Messrs. Dickerman and Allebrand entertained 
the Sigma boys and their lady friends at a 
dance on Friday evening at the Kinnikinnick. 

Supper was served to the active members at 
Mr. Dickerman's houme, and the dance took 
place immediately afterwards. 

The guests of the fraternity were Messrs. An- 
drus, Dickinson and Fitch from Denver, Mr. C. 
Elliott from Pueblo, and Mr. Lloyd Reeks. 



ACADEMY NOTES. 

William Jackson is just recovering from the 
effects of poison ivy. 

Among the out-of-town guests at the Sigma 
dance wtre Andrus, Fitch and Dickinson of E. 
D. H. S. and Elliott of Central H. S., of Pueblo. 

Moses and Allebrand remained in Pueblo over 
Sunday. 

Prof. Gile delightfully entertained the Third 
and Fourth Classes at his home Thursday night. 

Johnson entertained Hoover and Alden at din- 
ner Saturday night. 



THU flCBR. 



tt 



Bernard further distinguished himself as a 
bowler on Thursday night, when he established 
two alley records at the Crescent, rolling 279 in- 
a two-handed match, and 522 for two games. 

Miss Bruner was the guest of Miss Bernard 
Thursday night. 



Beta Sigma Phi entertained the football team 
at the home of Miss Gile, November 26th. A de- 
lightful evening was enjoyed with games and 
music. 

Miss Pierce, C. A. '06, has returned to her 
lujme in Chicago. She leaves a great many 
friends here who are \'ery sorry to have her go. 



i#«^«^f^<«^^«^«^^«^^«^«<i#4 



EXCHANGES 



THE FOOLISH DICTIONAR 



THE TENTH COMMANDMENT. 



Adamant — From "Adam's Aunt," reputed to be 
a hard character. Hence, anything tough or hard. 

Appendicitis — A modern pain costing about 
$200 more than the old-fashioned stomach ache. 

Augur — One who bored the ancients with 
prophecies. 

Blue — The only color we can feel. 

Bum — A fallen tough. 

Bump — A tough fall. 

Cannibal — One who loves his fellows. 

Cosmetic-^A new face-maker. From Greek 
Kosmos, order, and Eng-Medic, or doctor, or- 
dered by the doctor. 

Dachund — A low down dog. 

Dickens — An author : Polite term for the devil. 

Epitaph — A statement that usually lies above 
about the man who lies beneath. 

Fame — Having a brand of cigar named after 
you. 

Jelly Cake — Synonym for bellyache. 

Eight Fiction— The gas bill.— O. W. U. Tran- 
script. 



A MAIDEN'S SOLILOQUY. 

I am tired of dinners and ball, 

Of flirting by night and by day 
With men who do nothing but drawl 

In an utterly ludicrous way. 
I am tired of opera and play, 

Of wooers who never have won ; 
They are all very well, I dare say, 

But I've never yet met the right one. 

—Bx. 

Of all sad words of fountain pen, 
The saddest is the one, I think 

Which has been written down, and then 
Is blotted by a gob of ink. 

Mary had a little ewe 
So playful and so callow ; 

But when the heat reached 92 
It turned to mutton tallow. 



FOR NEW YORK. 

Thou shalt not covet thy neighbor's skyscraper, 
nor his trust, nor his watered stocks, nor his 
hired girl. 

FOR CHICAGO. 

Thou shalt not covet thy neighbor's wheat, 
nor his weather, nor his umbrella, nor his strikes. 

FOR ST. LOUIS. 

Thou shalt not covet thy neighbor's boarders, 
nor his visiting relatives, nor his rentable flats. 

FOR SAN FRANCISCO. 

Thou shalt not covet thy neighbor's automo- 
bile, nor his fish stories, nor his mother-in-law, 
nor his bathing suit. — Exchange. 

Deep wisdom — swelled head. 
Brain fever — he's dead. 
• The Senior. 

False fair one — hope fled. 
Hearts broken — he's dead. 
A Junior. 

Went skating — 'tis said. 

Ice hit him — he's dead. 

A Sophomore. 

Milk famine — not fed, 
Starvation — he's dead. 
A Freshie. 

Father (after whipping his son) — Will you 
ever say "yep" to me again ? 
Son — Nope. 

Prof. (Livy) — Miss — : — , you may recite." 

Miss (translating) — "So stupid and impu- 

rent the demand seems.'' 



Students, if in need of glasses or repairs on 
same, see Ashby, the Optical Jeweler, the oldest 
established in the county. You will find every- 
thing right. 



Thh tiger 



wareHEs, diamonds 



d^^'- 



1-^ 







a Special Discount of 10 per cent, to ail Students 



Zehner's 

Successors to 

^Goodspeed & 60. 
26 P. P. ave. 

The Ipery latest in 

Broochest Stick Pins, 

Sterling Silver 

Novelties 



College Pillow Tops far 
CKrlstma^s 

ASHFOKD ^ ROBERTS 

,yiri and *ytationery Co. 

126 N. Tejoiv 

15 per cent discouni to students on fra.ming 



When in doubt, take the safe side. 
Send bundles to the 

Colorado Springs Laundry 

Est. 20 yrs. Ralph Rice, College Agt. 



Bookkeeping 

Shorthand 

Typewriting 



CENTRAL 



College Estab- 
^^ X9 i i lished in 

JjusinessLolleye ^^"ver m (887 



L. A. ARNOLD, Pres. J. C. CROY, Prin. 

Nichols Block, 18 and 20 S. Tejon St., 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Rooms inviting, Work Thorough, Teachers up-to-date 

Call or Write for Information. 



THE COLORADO ROAOT 




^'"^''ooiSouw^^* 



If yoti Want 

The jBe-i"/, 

The QuicKe>si, 
The Most 

SatisfcLciory 

Line to Denver or Pueblo buy a Colo- 
rado & Southern Ticket. Get them at 
City Office, \<, N. Tejon. 

J. H. SPRINGER, Commercial Agent. 



Come in and ask questions. 



THE TIGER 



13 



WHEN IN NEED Of CLOTHING, HATS 
OR rURNISHINGS 

We would suggest that you consult your 

professor as to the best place lo go. 

We are willing to abide by their 

judgement as they all trade 

with us. We give spe- 

ial discount to students 

The B. W. DAVIS CLOTHING & FIR- 
NISHING CO., 102 N. Tejon Sf . 



The Williamson=Haffner 
Engraving Company 



1633 Arapahoe Street 



DENVER 



7)r. To. bowler, 

DENTIST 



IS South TJejon St. 



G. W. Pauly, B. S., D. O. Mrs. Lona E. Pauly, B. S. D. O. 

Graduates of A. T. Still's College of Osteopathy, 

Kirksville, Mo. 

DR. & MRS. PAULY, ?|^y1?c^S«' 

Office, rooms 303-301 DeGraff Bldg. 118 N. Tejon St., Colo- 
rado Springs, Colo. Plmnes— Off ice Red 1272 ; Res. Red 323 
Hours 8 to 12 a . m . , 1 to 5 p . m . 



F. H. Weeks 

26 East Bijou ^i* 

Photographs taken any hour 
of the day or evening by 
flashlight. Especially suit- 
able for groups. Call and see 
samples. 

Special R.ates td Stixdents 



next 



You are next to a good hair cut or shave when you patronize 



The Manhattan Barber Shop, J. R. WEYIMAR, Prop. 3o e. bijou 



WHITAKER & GARDNER 


^-A^^Tai^ndry 


30 N. TEJON ST. , 

Headqtiafter s for 


^)^p^\s^^=^ 


eolleqe Shoes 

OF EVERY DESCRIPTION 

We have the best mining and civil engineering boot 
in the market 

WHITAKER & GARDNER 


THE STAR is the leader for prompt 
and satisfactory service. 

SPECIAL RATES to students of col- 
lege and academy 

S. E. BENNETT, College Ag't. 


CHARLES P. BENNETT 


w. I. Lueas 


Real Estate, Loans 
and Insurance*^ ^ 

NO. 5 PIKE'S PEAK AVENUE 


Columbia, Hartford, Rambler, Ideal & Tribune Bicycles 

The only first-class rei air shop in town. Chainless wheels 
a specialty. Wheels for rent. Phone 517- V 1 29 N. Tejon 

Students wishing a Special Course in Drawing, 
Water Colors, Oil or China Pjinting«^ should call 
at Art Studio, 108 N. Tejon MARIE R. FORBISH, 
Member of Art Institute, Chicago. 



For Cut Glass, Hand Painted China, Silverware, 

Watches and Jewelry, see 

LaUTERMAN, Optical Jewelry, 121 N. Tejon 



REPAIRING A SPECIALTY. 



r4 



THE TIGER. 











Colorado College 






.THE OLDEST INSTITUTION FOR 






HIGHER EDUCATION IN THE WEST 




FOUNDED AT COLORADO 




SPRINGS IN J874 






Colorado College now offers advantages of the same 






grade as the best institutions. 






For information concerning Courses of Study, Rooms 






and Board, Physical Culture, etc., apply to 






WM. F. SLOCUM, President, 






or EDWARD S. PARSONS, Dean. 






For information in regard to the College Department of 






Music, inquire of 






EDWARD S. PARSONS, Dear,. 






Those wishing information as to the Courses in Drawing, 






Painting, Designing, etc., etc., inquire of 






EDWARD S. PARSONS, Dean. 






For information concerning the Engineering Depart- 






ment, apply to 






FLORIAN CAJORI, 






Dean of Engineering School. 




Cutler Academy 


Cutler Academy is the Associated Prepartory School of 




Colorado College, in which students are prepared for any 






American College. Address, 






M. C. GILE, Principal. 






. 





THE TIGER 



15 



The Albert Sechrist IManufacturing Co. 

WILL INSTALL GAS and 



1033 16th 
Street 




ELECTRIC FIXTURES 

in your residence at Colorado Spring's 
same price as Denver, without extra 
charg-e. Call and select your fixtures^ 
or will send you a catalog-ue. 



DENVLR, 
COI.O. 




'Ube line that suit's them all. 



Going Away for 
Christmas? 

If so, the best road to travel is 



Via 



^/?e 




Colorado Midland 



RsLilwaLy 



Reaches Cripple Creek, Buena Vista, Leadville, Aspen, 
Grand Junction and the West. 

Personally conducted California tours each week. 

R. T. DUNWAY, C. P. & T. A. 
C. H. SPEERS, Colorado Springs H. C. BUSH, . 

Gen. Pass. Agent Traffic Manager. 

DENVER, COLO. 



^ "Wagon Load of "^ "^ 

Ne^w Wood Type 

Af^d Other Ms^teris^ls 

0_f the xJery Latest at your DisposalJ^or 

Wirvdow ColfcIs 
Tickets, Flyers etc 

B J>f G 'RA V I /f G — C he Ti n e s t 

The Telegraph Job Rooms 119 e. p. p. Ave. 

Ask wKere TKe Tiger is Printed 



The ©Id 

Surio Store 

Wholesale and Retail 
Dealers in 

GENUINE INDIAN GOODS AND 
CURIOSITIES 

J. S. CANDELARIO, Prop., 

301 and 303 San Francisco Street, 

SANTA FE, N. M. 



NEW EMPIRE THEATRE 3 shows Daily -^ l Matinee 3 p. M 

^Toc Evenings 7:30 and 8:45 



IOC 



-VAUDEVILLE 



THE TIGER. 



El Paso Cleaning & Tailoring Co. Pressing Dyeing Altering 

HIE. Kiowa St. Phone Main 667=A Colo. SpriDgs Cleaning Repairing Tailoring 



Electro-Thermatoriuni Bath Parlors 

124 South Fejon Street 

Hot Air, Electric and Turkish Baths, Electric 

Light, Salt Glow and Packs. 

COLLINS & CO., Props. 



Office Phone 309-B 



Residence Phone Red 871 



DR. HARRY L. MOREHOUSE 



DENTIST 



Hours 9-12, 1:30-5 



First Nat'l Bank BIdg., room 8 



C. F. Arcuiarius & Co. 
3ewekr$ 

Diamonds and Watches 

Pine Jewelry Manufacturing 

9 South Tejon St. Colorado Sprinqs 



The 



Crissey & Fowler Lumber 
Company 

Phone 101 H7 to 123 West Vermijo Ave. 

Phone 540 

IVIonarch Hand 
Laundry 

421 S. Tejon 

KARL L. MOHLER, Prop. 
W. J. WALLRICH, College Agt. 

WE LHUNDER ANYTHING 

FINE CHOCOLATE BON BONS 



0^ 



Name on every Piece 

Ice Cream, Hot and Cold 
Sodas 

Fresh Candies made exery hour 



UNION ICE AND COAL COMPANY 

W. M. BANNING, Prop. 



Coal» mood and Tec 

Dealers in all kinds of Coal and Artificial and 
Natural Ice 

Yard Office, 105 W. Vermijo Ave. City Office, 5 N. Tejon 




JOHIN MOFFAT 

fine Cailoring 

Repairing, Cleaning, Pressing. Special rates to 
College Students 

Over Waiting's Book Store 16 South Tejon St. 



Carriages, Cabs, 

'Busses, Baggage and 

Transfer Wagons 

Office, 15 Morth Cascade 



Denver Law School 

Law Department of the 
University of Denver 

Three years' course leading to the degree of 
Bachelor of Laws. Courses in Mining and Irri- 
gation Law. Full resident faculty. For informa- 
tion address 

LUCIUS W. HOYT, Dean 

Ernest & Cranmer BIdg., Denver, Colo. 

Did You Know 

That our stock of package crackers is so 
great in its variety that you could have a 
change for every day for more than two 
months and yet not exhaust our list? Well, 
it's a fact. We have a kind for every pos- 
sible time and occasion — and they are all 
good. Finest bakery goods in the city. 
Fancy Groceries 

W. N. BURGESS, 112 N. Tejon St. 

Titsworth & Davidson 
DAIRY 

2 MILES S. E. OF COLORADO SPRINGS. P. 0. BOX 6 

The Houck-Davidson Coal and Transfer Co. 

Dealers In 

CANON CITY, MAITLAND 

AND LIGNITE COAL 

Phone 473-B. Office 118 N. Tejon. P. O. Box 257 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 



▼ ▼ 



♦ See 

♦ 24 E. Kiowa St. 



^he Gowdy-Stmmons Printing Company 

FOR WINDOW CARDS, TICKETS, ETC. ENGRAVED 
CARDS AND INVITATIONS ON SHORT NOTICE 



2/ Tforth 
TJ^/on Si, 



VBB NVIIVO 

eniNESB AND JAPANESE 
PANGY GOODS 



Colorado Springs, Colo. 



THE DERN TEA AND COFFEE €©• ♦ 

Dealers in TEAS, COFFEES, SPICES, t 

EXTRACTS, BAKING POWDERS, Etc. t 



Phone 575 



29S. TejonSt. ^ 



The PeopIe^s Gf ocei^y and Market 



PHONE MAIN 868 




♦ S. JAMES & SON, Props. 



222 EAST PIKE'S PEAK 



Colorado Springs, Colorado 






ST. JOHN & BARNES 

Oldest and largest plumbing and heating 

establishment in city. Your 

patronage solicited 



Telephone 13 



206 N. Tejon St. 



Phone Main 151 



Established 1897 



p. W. SMITH 

FAMILY GROCER, TEA AND 
COFFEE MERCHANT . : : : : 
Orders Called for and Promptly Delivered 

717 N. Weber St. Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Wherever Colorado Coal is sold, 
the word 

"Maitland^^ 

is known 

We are Sole Agents in Colorado Springs 

The Colorado Sprin|(s 

Fuel Co. "AtthesigooftheBedMea." 



For goodness $ake<&<t 

Use TUDOR lower vein Coal 
It beats all other Lignite 

TUDOR COAL COMPANY, Cor. Cascade and Cucharas 

<Ask your dealer for 

VICTOR 



Athletic 
Supplies 




HELP THE TIGER 

by buying 

Scott Bicycle Tbes 

Write 0s if yod cannot get them of 
yoar dealer. 

THE scon SUPPLY & TOOL CO. 

DENVER, COIO. 



The Colorado Springs Electric Co. : 



I USE ELECTRIC LIGHT 
♦ IN YOUR HOMES 

X***********************^*** ****************** 



♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦4» ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ ♦♦^♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦j 






The Yoviig Men^s Store* 



Pall Suits of Merit 



OVR MEJ^'^ VEIGff^ 

for young men are proving very popular among College 
men. Our efforts this season have been bent towards 
giving young men equally as good stlyes as those worn 
by College men of the East. 



♦ SPECIAL DISCOUNT 

♦ TO ALL STUDENTS 



HOLBROOK & PERKINS 



THE DENVER FIRE CLAY CO. 

MANUrACTURERS OF 
AND DEALERS IN 






I Chemical and Physicial Apparatus and Chemicals X 



A FULL LINE OF LABORATORY SIPPLIES AND ASSAY GOODS 
Write for Illustrated Catalogues 



I 1742-1746 Champa Street, 



DENVER, COLORADO I 

♦ 



DCf" 



iPhotoffraphs 



at BINGHAM & WOOD'S. 18 S. Tejon ♦ 



4^ H. C. COLBURN, Pfcs. 



E. A, COLBURN^ Jr., Scc'y and Trcas. 



♦ 

4* 
♦ 
4* 

4* 

4> 
♦ 

4» 



The ^fxtler^: ^yititotnohile Co. 

LIVER.Y, STORAGE. REPAIRING 

Telephone Main I'l'Z S-IO ff, J>feH)ada AH)e. Colorado Springs, Colo, 



♦ 




O. E. HEMENWAY 



Groceries and Meats 



115 South Tejon St 
Colorado Springs^ Colorado 




♦ 4»4*«4'4>4>«l*4*«4*4»4'4>4>4'4>4'4»*l'4'4>4*4i 4> <i> 4'4*4>«i>4'<i*4*«i'4'4»4*4i4»4'4»4> 



•I* 



kJ ( Q 



IH£ TIGBR 



Colora.do College 



\ 




/ 



VOL\/MJE^ VII. 



15tK, 1904 

dumber 14-. 



* 

♦ 

4* 
4* 
•i* 

4* 
4* 
4> 
4* 
4* 
4* 
4» 
* 
4* 



l*4*4>4'4>4*4*4>4'^4*4'4*4'4*4*4»4>4*4*4*4 

Special Rates to Students 

On Rented Pianos 




The KNIGHT = eSMPBELL 
Music Company 



New Lennox Block 



Opposite North Park 



St. John Bros.r'™*'™'"' 

Gas and Steam Fitters 

Hot Water Heating a Specialty 

Prompt attention given to Repair Work. 

Curtis goal Go. 

Office 132 N. Tejon St. Telephone 91. 

Try "NEW RANGE" for the Kitchen, $4.00. 
BiTUMNOUs Coal at Standard Prices. 



SELDOMRIDGE BROTHERS, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

Flour, Feed, Grain, Hay and Seeds 

10s South Tejon Street 

Repairing while You Wait Satisfaction Guaranteed 

A complete plant of New Machinery for 
the Manufacture of Fine Boots and Shoes 

The Lightning Shoe Shop 

BROWN & COMPANY 
We make a specialty of Shoes to Measure and Shoes for 
Cripples. 28Vi North Tejon St. Colorado Springs 

Visiting Cards in Latest Styles. 

WE SHOW 



YOD 



By advertising in THE TiGER that we 
........... appreciate your custom. 

22 E. Kiowa St. The Prompt Printery 
The 



; Hassell Iron Works Co, 



Founders and Machinists 



*i''i*4*'&4»4*4*4*'i*'i' 4*4* 4>*i*4*4*4*4*4*4*4*4* 

CKristnvdLS 

PK/i4rkc Artistic in Posing, 
t llUlUd Lighting and Finish 

Discount to Students 




^IBT/UM f 



Phone 679-a 
Corner Cascade and Kiowa 




COLLEGE GOWNS, CAPS 

The Best Workmanship 
at Lowest Prices 

Silk Faculty Gowns and Hoods 

COX SONS & VINING 

262 Fourth Avenue., NEW YORK '1^ 

SKATES 

Hockey Sticks 

IslSWEHTERS 

Basket Ball and 
Y. M. e. H. Suits 

at Strangs 

119 North Tejon Street 

Mueth's 

Soda, Ice (Sream 

e^TERING 

CHAS. T. FERTIG 

'^al Estate, Loans and Insurance 

29 N. Tejon Street 

TjJko Colorado Sprtnffs floral Co* 

FLORISTS 

yO'^ y/orfA ZTe/on Sti-oa, 



* 

•I* 

4* 

* 

4* 

4* 
4» 
4* 
4* 
4* 
4* 
^ 
4* 
4* 
4> 
4* 
4* 
4i 
4» 

4* 

4* 

4" 



DOVGi^As (Ql he^the:r.ington 

Phone 556-B Rooms 15-16 Outwest Building, Colorado Springs, Colo. 

4•4>4'4•4*4»4•4•4•4>4>4•4•4•4•4•4•4•4*4*4•4»4i4>4*4•4•4•4•4•4•4•4•4•4>4•4•4>4>•^4*4•4•4* 



THE TIGBR. 



Student's Book Store Books, stationery; an Engi- 

neer s Supplies; College Pins 



and Watch Fobs, 
and up. 



Century Fountain Pens $1 to $4, Waterman's $2.50 

R EYER & PLATT. 

For Si 00 P6r month ' ^"'^ sponged and Pressed each week 

— ^ PANTATORIUM, 

17 East Bijou, Branch Office opp. Plaza Hotel. 



THE COLORADO SPRINGS CO. 

The Original Locators of 

Colorado Springs and TTfanitou 

is still offering for sale choice 
lots on North Weber Street 
and North Wahsatch Avenue 

Also lots for sale In other parts of Colorado Springs 
and in Manitou 

Apply at ROOMS, OUTWEST BUILDING 



I Ofim ^nri^6IC steam Dye and Cleanmg 

Office and Works, 115 N. Tejon St. 
TELEPHONE 517-B 

Cleaning, Dyeiug, Scouring in all its branches 
Ostrich Plumes Cleaned, Dyed and Curled 
Kid Gloves Dyed and Cleaned. 



GIDDINGS BROS, 

Fine dress Goods and Ladies' 
TAILOR Suits, Ladies' 
Furnishings 



Kiowa and Tejon Streets. 



We do Everything in the Tailoring 
Line 

], B. CORRIN 

103 E. Bijou St, COLORADO SPRINGS, COLO. 

D, E. MONROE & CO. 
Prescription Drugflist 

The best of Drugs, Stationery and Toilet Articles 

NO LIQUORS SOLD. 
Coi*. T^ioti Sf Bijou Phone 311 Sf 331 

THE HEFLEY-ARCUL4RIUS DRUG CO. 
DrudSists 

Kodaks, Cameras and all kinds of Photographic 
Supplies. Developing and Printing for Am ituers. 
Free Delivery. 
Phone 144 21 South Tejon Street 



liardivare Bicycles 

fl. S. BLHKE 

New Chainless Bicycle $35 and $20 
Rambler, Orient and National Automobiles 

Best Repair Shop in city 107 n. Cefon 

nirs^ B^ R* Crooks 

Coilet Parlors at 20 Cast Hiowa 

Also Room 52, Antlers Hotel 

No Apprentices. Only experienced help employed. 

A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 

Largest Manufacturers in the World of Official 
Athletic Supplies 

BASE BALL, BASKET BALL, GOLF, BOXING GLOVES, 
STRIKING B\GS, GYMNASIUVI GOODS. 

Spalding's Trade Mark goods are the acme of perfection; 
accept no goods that are not the Spalding kind ; there is no 
substitute for a Spalding article. 

Every base ball manager should send at once for a copy 
of Spalding's Spring and Summer Catalogue. It's free. 

Spalding's Athletic Almanac for 1905. Price 10 Cts. 
per copy 

A, G. SPALDING & BROS. 

xVew York, Chicago, Denver San Francisco, St. Louis 

HENRY TAMM 

Druggist 

PRESCRIPTIONS 
TOILET ARTICLES 
STATIONERY 

All Popular Drinks Served 
at our Soda Fountain 

Plaza Hotel, Cor. Cache la Poudre & Tejon Sts. 

THE RUGBY=PRmROSE COAL CO. 

All Kinds of Fuel 

Phone 481-A West 44-A 21 N. TEJON ST. 



H.KR31NZ 



poReEuaix 
H. KRANZ & 



BATH TUBS 

e©., Barbers 



F. R. SMITH 



Only 8 Chair Barber Shop in the City 

I06H B. Pike's Peak 21ve. 



Try the \ lectric Vibrassage Machine 
eOLORAOO SPRINGS. eOLG. 



THE TIGER 



FITS I 



CORRECTLY 



COPTBIQHTED 

It Saves You Money and Time 

When I examine your eyes or fit your glasses. My NEW 
METHOD is perfection beyond a doubt. Consultation 
Free. DR. SCHADT, O. D. 

Eyesight Specialist. 
Office 303 Colorado BIdg., cor. Tejon and Huerfano 

Use Gas 



We sell a GOOD FOUNTAIN PEN for $1 

WHITNEY & GRIMWOOD 

Opera House Bttilding 

We are agents for WATERMAN'S IDEAL FOUNTAIN 
Pens. Prices from $2. 50 up. 



Watchmaker and Jeweler 

15 South TJejon «5V. 




AND 




1739 Champa St., DENVER, COLO. 



C. W. WARSOP & CO.. 



205 N. Tejon St. 



Draperies, Upholstery Goods, Furniture. Complete line of Screens, 
Pillows, Pillow Tops, Couch Covers, etc. 



The 50-mile-an-hour Wheel 


THE CRESCENT 


Reading Standard Bicycles 

SUbFF & KltittS Opposite Flaza Hotel 


BOWLING ALLEYS 






ff^erkins Croc/ceri/ Co. 

F. A. PERKINS, Manager 

/20 ^. Ve/on Si. 


Telephone IVIain 863 
E. S. SOLLENBfRGER, Mgr. 

Private Alleys for Ladies 
Eight Alleys on one Floor 
Special Rates to Parties and Clubs 


FRANK F. CRIMP 

FLORIST 

Phone 500 5og E. Columbia St. 

Special attention given to Telephone Orders. 


H. E. BOATRIGHT 

Public Steno£rrapher 

33 GIDDINGS BLDG. 
Rates 5c per 100 words, 50c per hr. extra carbons 5c i er page 



PHOTOGRAPHS at Popular Prices 

at MERRICK'S, 30 SOUTH TEJON ST. 

If you want to give pictures to college friends it will not be so expensive if you have your woik done here. 



FRANK H. SMALL watches, Diamonds, fine Watch Work. Special 
Jeweler and Silversmith P"ce to Students. 113 Pike's Peak Ave. 



Vol. VII. 



nhe TIGCR 



COLORADO COLLEGE, DECEMBER 15, 1904. 



No. 14 



A CHRISTMAS STORY 



It was midnight. The noise and confusion that 
had reigned supreme in Bethlehem all day had 
given place to a deep silence. The shepherds on 
the neighboring hills had ceased talking. Nature 
seemed waiting in breathless expectancy. Sud- 
denly, an angel appearel before the startled shep- 
herds, and a bright light illumined all the sky. 
The angel spoke, and at his words fear left the 
shepherds, for he said, "Fear not ; for behold, I 
bring you good tidings of great joy, which shall 
hv to all people. For unto you is born this day 
in the city of David a Savior, which is Christ 
the Lord. And this shall be a sign unto you : Ye 
shall find the babe wrapped in swaddling clothes, 
Ij'ing in a manger." Then appeared a host of 
angels who sang "Glory to God in the highest, 
and on earth peace, good will to men." The light 
vanished, the heavenly host disappeared, but the 
song they has sung still echoed among the hills, 
and the shepherds by common consent set out for 
Bethlehem. 

Over one of the cave-stables belonging to the 
inn, stood a brilliant star. The shepherds entered 
the cave and saw the child in the manger and 
three men in beautiful garments kneeling before 
him, while on the floor of the cave lay strewn 
priceless gifts of gold and spices. The shep- 
herds fell on their knees in awe and seemed to 
hear again the angels' song, "Glory to God in the 
highest, and on earth peace, good will to men." 

Not far from the cave there was a smouldering 
fire, and beside it lay the body of a woman cold in 
death. At her side stood a man holding a new 
born infant. Just outside the circle of light sat 
an old woman, swaying to and fro. Suddenly the 
man handed the child to her and turning saw 
the star over the stable. Some impulse made him 
gr. toward it, and soon he stood at the entrance, 
unperceived by any one. His gaze traveled from 
the shepherds and the three men in such rich 
robes who knelt upon the floor, to the gold and 
spices scattered about, and thence to the child, 
lying in the' manger, and to the face of the young 
mother. He stood silent for a moment, and then 
turned and walked slowly back to the fire and 
stood looking at his dead wife. 
* * * 

In Nazareth lived two carpenters, Nathan and 
Joseph. Nathan had one son, Simeon, and 



Joseph's oldest son was called Jesus. The two 
bds were of the same age. Both had been born at 
Bethlehem at the time of the taxing, but Simeon's 
mother had died at his birth, while the mother of 
Jesus still lived. The two boys were playmates 
and fast friends, though they differed in every 
respect. Simeon was wild and reckless, though 
kindhearted ; while Jesus was quiet and gentle 
and loved by everyone. 

Simeon loved to talk of the great things he 
would do when he became a man, but the boy 
Jesus was always silent concerning his ambi- 
tions and plans for the future. Often, when 
Simeon questioned him, a sadness would come 
over his face and he would say, "I will do the 
will of my Father." At this Simeon would ex- 
claim, "But thou wilt be a man then, and able to 
do as thou pleasest !" Jesus, however, would re- 
main silent. 

One day the two lads were walking together, 
and Simeon, seeing a sparrow flying through the 
air, cried, "Couldst thou do this?" at the same 
throwing a stone at the bird. His aim was good, 
and the little creature fell to the ground with a 
broken wing. Jesus gently lifted it and said, "O 
Simeon, how couldst thou?" Simeon, who was 
not cruel by nature, bent over the little creature 
in remorseful pity. Then the boy Jesus touched 
the broken wing and the little sparrow flew^ away, 
as well as ever. After this, worship was mingled 
with Simeon's love for Jesus. 

So they grew up together, always fast friends, 
till they reached manhood. Then Simeon departed 
from Nazareth, and Jesus went to do "his Fath- 
er's will." 



Three crosses stood outlined against the sky. 
On the central cross hung the man Christ Jesus, 
with the inscription over his head, "This is the 
King of the Jews." His face was white and drawn 
with anguish, but he uttered no word of com- 
plaint. The thief nailed to the cross at the left 
cursed and groaned and finally, turning to Jesus, 
said, "If thou be the Christ, save thyself and us." 
The thief on the cross at the right, who had en- 
dured the pain in silence, said sternly, "Dost thou 
not fear God, seeing thou art in the same con- 
demnation? And w-e endeed justly, for we receive 
the due reward of our deeds; but this man hath 



THE TIGER 



done nothing amiss." Jesus turned hjs head and 
looked at the speaker, whose face became trans- 
figured with joy. The Christ smiled, for in that 
sin-scarred face he recognized his boyhood's 
friend, Simeon. As he looked at the Christ, 
Simeon's face seemed to lose its traces of sin and 
became as the face of a little child, and he said, 
"Lord, remember me when Thou comest into Thy 
Kingdom." "Verily, I say unto thee, today shalt 
thou be with me in paradise," the Savior replied. 



THE FRESHMAN-SOPHOMORE DECLAM- 
ATORY CONTEST. 

The Freshmen settled up old scores with the 
Sophomores last Tuesday night at the declamatory 
contest. Mr. Musser of the Class of '08, won 
first prize, $15, and Mr. Harper carried off the 
second prize, $10. The Sophomores won third, 
Mr. Bartlett being awarded the honor. Both 
clnsses are to be congratulated upon the splen- 
did showing of their representatives, and all the 
men should be strongly commended for their ef- 
forts. The program deserved a much better at- 
tendance than was present, since any contest of 
t: at nature tends to develop one side of College 
life whch has been sadly neglected in the past. 
In the enthusiasm and excitement of class "scraps" 
and class football games, we are apt to forget that 
tht question of class supremacy does not concern 
itself entirely with physical skill and prowess. 
Victory such as the Freshmen gained Tuesday 
night ought to bring as much satisfaction as the 
ordinary class football or baseball game. Mr. 
DeWitt, to whose efforts the credit is due for 
arranging the contest, must feel encouraged by the 
sp'rit and interest that the rival classes manifested. 
With a precedent of two years before them, the 
next year's Freshman and Sophomore classes 
sliould see to it that this contest becomes an an- 
nual event. Besides the successful contestants, 
Mr. Lake and Mr. Seybold deserve honorable 
mention for the splendid showing they made. Mr. 
Musser, the winner, is graceful on the floor, and 
besides he has the advantage of a splendid voice. 
Both Mr. Harper and Mr. Bartlett showed ability 
tr. adapt themselves to change of character and 
temperament. Throughout the contest itself, the 
Freshman Class displayed more loyalty and spirit 
than their rivals. The Sophomores were either 
too sure of victory, or else they were content to 
rest on their laurels already won. The Fresh- 
men attended in a body and greeted each of their 
representatives with an encouraging cheer as he 
stepped upon the platform. After the contest was 
over the friends and admirers of the victors gal- 
lantly escorted them to Tamm's, and there dem- 
onstrated the inadvisability of having too much 
money about the person after dark. 



A NEW SOCIETY. 

The Colorado College Chemical Club, other- 
wise to be known as the Four C's, is the latest 
thing in the way of a scientific organization. Its 
active membership is limited to upper classmen 
who are takng quantitative analysis, or third year 
of College Physics. Graduate students or pro- 
fessors of the departments of Physics and Chem- 
istry may become associate members. 

The object of the club is to promote original 
research among the students. 

Monday night the club held its first regular 
program, at the home of Prof. Crabtree, as fol- 
lows : 

"Ionization and Mass Action" .... W. H. Nead 
"A New Separation of Arsenic and Antimony" 

J. H. Finger 

"Cement" W. E. Hester 

"Review of Current Literature" . . O. W. Stewart 
"H2O2 Separation of Manganese" .... C. N. Cox 
"Radium and Allied Metals" Joseph Horn 

Regular meetings are to be held the first Mon- 
day night of each month. Officers : President : 
W. H. Nead; Vice President, O. W. Stewart; 
Secretary-Treasurer, C. N. Cox. 



MUSEUM. 



Since the arrangement of the Museum in 
Palmer Hall three lines of work have been taken 
up. namely, scientific arrangement, classifying and 
labeling the specimens, and the preparation of a 
card catalogue. From the opening in February 
until the close of the school year the work of 
classification was taken up by Prof. T. D. A. 
Cockerell. During the summer months the col- 
lections were rearranged and grouped in scien- 
tific order. The Natural History specimens were 
tlien classified and labeled. For the pubic in 
general the labels on the specimens are suffi- 
cient, but to the student who ■ wishes to make a 
study of any of the specimens this is not enough. 
To meet this need, a systematic card catalogue 
is now being prepared. In view of installing the 
best system, a study of the systems now in use 
by the foremost museums of America has been 
made, and as a result the following system has 
been formulated. On the index cards of the 
classes, orders, sub-orders and families are given 
the distinguishing characteristics and a list of 
literature references. 

On the genus cards are given the name of the 
genus, authority and date when the genus was 
named ; the type of the genus, authori'^y, and 
where found ; the derivative of the genus name 
and its meaning; the species name and author- 
ity ; the common name and locality where the 
specimen was found ; the sex, young or adult, 
donor's name, and catalogue number; on the back 



THE TIGER 



of the card is given a list of literature on the 
specimen. 

Whether the specimen is a present day form, 
fossil or cast is designated by the color of the 
card used. 

The Museum contains about 16,000 specimens, 
most of which are well labeled. As soon as the 
cataloguing cf the Natural History specimens is 
completed, the labeling of the Archaeological col- 
lections will be taken up, and later the catalogu- 
ing of the Palaeontological specimens and casts. 

The value of our Museum cannot be over-esti- 
mated. A man who visits all the colleges and 
universities in seven states of the Central West 
made the following statement a few weeks ago:_ 
"Colorado College can be proud of her Museum, 
for she has by far the largest and best of any 
school in the states in which I travel." This 
means Colorado College has the advantage of 
better material for study and illustration pur- 
poses. 

To the students the Museum is a place of in- 
struction, to the public it is a place of amuse- 
ment, and to the College it is among the fore- 
most methods of advertising. So, if we want to 
be a booster, let us remember and use the Mu- 
seum in advertising the College among our 
friends during vacation. 



SUCCESS IN THE ARMY OF FORMER 
COLLEGE STUDENT. 

Brigadier General Greenleaf Austin Goodale, 
United States army, retired, has received a roster 
of the officers of the Twenty-third Infantry, 
Colonel Philip Reade commanding, about to close 
its second tour of duty in the Philippines. 

Captain George S. Goodale, Adjutant of the 
regiment, will be remembered by many in this 
city as a 'student in Colorado College from 1888 
to 1892, when Representative Townsend appoint- 
ed him, on competitive examination, to the Unit- 
ed States Military Academy at West Point, where 
he graduated in 1896 and was assigned to the regi- 
ment in which his father had served for a third 
of a century. Captain Goodale organized and 
was Captain of the last company of cadets at 
Colorado College. 

General and Mrs. Goodale, a sister of Mrs. W. 
F. Slocum, are visiting their son, R. L. Goodale, 
of the Colorado Springs Electric Company, at 
219 East San Miguel street. 



rightly. Yet it is a beautiful thing to be able to 
receive rightly. How can this be done? By re- 
ceiving simply that we may give. This is un- 
selfishness. Take something and give something 
b;'ck in return. And in your giving, don't be 
prejudiced, ])ut give to those who need it, rather 
th.an simply to the accomplished, the intellectual, 
o- the attractive. Also, in your giving you must 
give something truly helpful. Christmas brings 
this lesson especially near to us. This is the 
greatest time of the year for giving and receiving. 
At this time, when we are receiving so much 
from our friends, from our College and from 
God, don't let us forget to give back something. 
And let that something be the best and noblest 
that we possess. 



RIP VAN WINKLE. 

Next Monday the Foot-lights Club starts on 
the road. This is an entirely new departure in 
Colorado, but the people on the line of march 
need not fear that they will not get their money's 
worth. This opera was presented by the men of 
Pearson's Literary Society last spring, and was 
conceded by excellent critics to be the event of 
the year in College musical circles. This year the 
Club starts out with the best of last year's caste, 
v.ho have the benefit of that experience, while 
the rest of the Club is made up from the best 
talent of the College, regardless of their affilia- 
tions with any society or organization in school. 
All students living in any city where the Club 
will play during Christmas vacation should do 
all in their power to see that they get a good 
house. The Glee Club has been a very potent in- 
fluence in past years in turning students to Colo- 
rado College, and the Footlights Club is a worthy 
successor. The dates and places of performance 
are as follows : 

Monday, December 19 — Louisville. 

Tuesday, December 20 — Lafayette. 

Wednesday, December 21 — Loveland. 

Thursday, December 22 — Berthoud. 

Friday, December 23 — Windsor. 

Monday, December 23 — Brighton. 

Tuesday, December 27 — Fort Morgan. 

Wednesday, December 28 — Brush. 

Thursday, December 29 — Stirling. 

Friday, December 30 — Cheyenne. 

Saturday, Decemebr 31 — Greeley. 



ETHICAL ADDRESS. 



HIS EXCUSE. 



President Slocum's remarks last Friday morn- 
ing were on "How to Receive." We must re- 
ceive, so as not to injure ourselves by the re- 
ceiving. There is great danger of becoming pau- 
perized and fault-finding if we do not receive 



Woman of the Plouse (with marked severity) 
— Why don't you wash your face once in a 
w' -le? 

Saymold Story — Keeps me busy feedin' it, 
ma'am. Hain't got time. — Exchange. 



^ THE 

THE TIGER, 

Published weekly during the College year by 
The Tiger Publishing Co., in the interest of Colo- 
rado College. 

J. Y. Crothers Editor-in-Chief 

T. Hunter Assistant Editor-in-Chief 

J. I. Muffiey Athletic Editor 

Miriam Carpenter Literary Editor 

Mabel Barbee Alumni Editor 

A. H. Fisher Local Editor 

Bert Wasley Business Manager 

C. A. Hedblom Assistant Business Manager 

CORRESPONDENTS: 

Mr. Nash, Miss McDowell, Miss Isham, Miss 
Kidder, Mr. Lamb, Mr. Reeks, Miss Arbuckle. 

Subscription, $1.25 per year, payable in advance. 
Single copy, 5 cents. 

The Tiger is forwarded to all subscribers until 
ordered discontinued and all arrearanges are paid. 

Students, Professors and Alumni are invited 
to contribute literary articles, personals and items. 
Contributions must be accompanied by the writer's 
name. 

Address all communications to The Tiger^, 
Colorado College, Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Entered at the Postoffice at Colorado Springs, 
Colo., as second-class matter. 



TIGBR. 



Patronize Tiger Advertisers 



EDITORIAL 



AU REVOIR. 



"THERE is but one day more of study before the 
year of 1904 ends. It is possible that some 
of you will take your books with you, and in- 
tend to make up work during vacation, but this 
should not be so. The better policy is to do each 
day's work well, and in season, when it will be 
unnecessary to spoil the holidays by worry over 
work left undone. Vacation is given us as a 
period of rest and recuperation. If the rest is 
not needed it is our own fault, for there has been 
enough to do in the past three months to tax the 
strength of the strongest if done well. Put every 
care aside for the short space of two weeks, and 
have the very best time possible. This does not 
mean that you are to loaf the whole time, but 
th.at you are to have a change of occupation at 
least. You will have a chance to influence many 
high school students as to the college they shall 
attend. If they find that you urge the claims of 
Colorado College in a half-hearted way, they 
will not be inclined to believe that this is the right 



place for them. After having seen three of the 
other institutions of higher education in the state, 
we should have no hesitation in urging students 
to come to Colorado College, if they expect to 
take up lines of work in which Colorado College 
competes with these institutions. There are 
courses which the College does not pretend to 
offer, and students wishing these courses will 
have to go elsewhere, to their misfortune. The 
writer was once charged with thinking his was 
the best College in the state; he admitted it 
frankly, and has had no reason since for changing 
his mind on that point. 



ORATORY. 



THE spirit displayed last Tuesday night at the 
contest between the Freshmen and Sopho- 
mores was most encouraging. The excellence of 
the program augurs well for the standing of 
Colorado College in oratory for years to come. 
This contest is one which should by all means be 
made a permanent feature of public speaking. It 
not only develops a spirit in the College which 
will make all the students support our representa- 
tives on the platform more enthusiastically, but 
it guarantees that men with any talent in speaking 
at all will be more eager to develop that talent, 
since more inerest is taken in this line of work. 
The training received in the lower classes will 
be very helpful to the men when they enter the 
intercollegiate oratorical contests or the inter- 
state debates. Remember that we have both of 
these events at home this year, and must win 
both. Rooting will have as much effect on men 
in these contests as in athletics. You see your 
duty, do it. 



THE Tiger will not appear on the first Thurs- 
day after vacation, as there will be littk 
doing in College circles in the meantime, and the 
time between the opening of school and that date 
is too short to get out the paper. 



SUBSCRIPTIONS. 

VOUR subscriptions are now payable. The 
management is in dire need of money for 
Christmas purchases, and would feel very grate- 
ful to any who would not wait to be hunted up, 
but would come forward of their own accord. 
Don't wait for Wasley or Hedblom to see you, 
but go to them. Do it now. 



P\ID you correspondents know how much your 
work is appreciated? It has been stated by 
several persons that the part of the Tiger they 
liked best, the party they read first, was the 
Tiger Notes. There is good material for a New 
Year's resolve. "More dope." 



THE TIGER 



C OR several reasons it has seemed best to post- 
pone the Engineering edition until some timcf 
after the Holidays. 



Y. W. C. A. 



Miss McDowell led the last meeting, taking 
foi her subject, "Sunshine." 

She spoke of having the spirit of sunshine in 
our hearts at this Christmas season, to take an in- 
terest in those who are unhappy, and to look for 



the bright things in life. 

She showed that happiness is not merely de- 
pendent upon circumstances, but is a state of mind 
that may be cultivated. Strong faith in the love 
of God forms the foundation of happiness. 



PEARSONS LITERARY SOCIETY. 

At the meeting next Friday a debate will be 
held on the inter-society question. The meeting 
will be closed. 




To THE Editor of the Tiger. 

Dear Sir: I note with great interest the article 
ii: the TiGER encouraging the organiaztion of a 
Cross Country Club. Nothing could be of greater 
interest to the men of C. C. than such an or- 
ganization. Probably a suggestion as to the great 
interest taken in the organization here at Michi- 
gan University would be of interest to those push- 
ing the movement in Colorado College. The 
cross country runs began early in the college 
year, taking at first only short runs, across the 
campus and through the residence portion of the 
city. The squad was large, and they did not 
hesitate even running across private lawns and 
through the business section. Soon they were 
out for a half an hour and then for three quar 
tcrs of an hour every day. Once a week squads 
ran to Ypsilanti, nine miles from here, return- 
ing with students who are there to meet them. 
Of late considerable snow has fallen, and it seems 
colder than it ever gets to be in Colorado, but the 
men are out just the same, running through snow 
banks and over ice. Although, when it is coldest, 
the men are not gone from the gymnasium more 
than ten or fifteen minutes, and are taken through 
a series of performances by the leader. One who 
has not had a sample of this invigorating exer- 
cise cannot fully realize the value, both to those 
who have an intention to compete in a track team 
and those who do not. It was an entirely new 
experience for me to don a track suit, but the 
athletic spirit here is so strong that one feels out 
of place, if not taking part in some kind of ath- 
letic sport. But I hear some one say, "We are 
at a disadvantage because we have not a first- 
class gymnasium " The Gymnasium at Colorado 



College, if the shower baths are in working order, 
is good enough for all work, or preliminary train- 
ing in track athletics. If Colorado College men 
train as the students of other institutions do, 
there is no reason why they cannot compete fa- 
vorably with any institution in the West. The 
athletic spirit ought to take hold of men, afford- 
ing them the keenest pleasure in all athletic 
sports. Begin this year and set a precedent in 
Colorado College that will carry a man into 
athletics whether he wants to or not. Let Colo- 
rado College show Boulder that by an equal 
amount of training she can surpass her in all 
around track athletics. C. C. M., ex-'o6. 



ATHLETIC BOARD MEETS. 

An important meeting of the Athletic Board 
was held Tuesday evening. The managers of this 
year's baseball team, and next year's football team 
were elected. Bert Wasley has the former posi- 
tion, while J. K. McClintock holds the latter. 

The following amendment to the Constitution 
of the Colorado College Athletic Association was 
proposed, said amendment to be acted upon at the 
regular meeting of the Association on January 
23, 1905- 

"article I. 

"The fiscal year shall be closed on February 15 
of each year, and all debts against the Associa- 
tion shall be liquidated by that date. 

"It is further provided that no expense for Ath- 
letics shall be incurred till this be accomplished.' 

The "C's" were awarded for the past season. 
The men who have played two championship 
games, and therefore won their "C's" are : Lester 



B,- 



The tigur. 



S. Bale, C. A. Hedblom, H. H. Fawcett, B. Mos- 
ttller, Earl Howbert, Walter Nead, F. M. Rob- 
erts, A. E. Fisher, J. J. Vandemoer, Captain Eor- 
ing Lennox, William Lennox, "Billy" Johnston, 
Orrin Randolph, Fred Hill, Harry Scibird, Roy 
Mack, Reuel Morgan, George Gibbs. 



Middlesworth, French and Currier vs. Reyer and 

Nash, Smith and McLean vs. Moore and . 



HOCKEY. 



The need of a College skating pond has been 
felt for many years. An attempt to meet that 
need was made some time ago by the formation 
of a pond at the northern edge of the campus, 
along Monument creek, but the area was so lim- 
ited and the small boy so much in evidence that 
it was an aggravation rather than a pleasure to 
skate thereon. The lake on the new park being 
made by General Palmer along Monument creek 
comes nearer satisfying the wants of the Col- 
lege students, but the same objections as those 
stated above hold, however, in a lesser degree. 

Doubtless you may have discovered what the 
writer is driving at — the flooding of Washburn 
Field as a distinctively College skating pond. 
This would give a perfectly safe sport, and the 
area which could be flooded would be large 
ei)ough to guarantee a real enjoyment of the sport, 
if open to College students and Faculty only. The 
flooding of the Field should not cost much, and 
might be accomplished practically without cost 
after the first time. The total cost could be 
miade up by a small fee charged to outsiders only, 
for. the use of the ice. 

Should this proposition be carjfied out, the 
College would have opened to it one of the most 
exciting of athletic contests. A College hockey 
team of no mean skill could be formed, which 
could get all the games it wanted to play. If you 
want to feel stirred up on the matter somewhat, 
read the last part of "Glengarry School Days," by 
Ralph Connor. His story of the meet between 
the different schools in "shinny on the ice" takes 
rank with the football or cricket match in "Tom 
Bf-own." Who knows but we may develop into 
as famous a school as Rugby if we only make use 
of all our opportunities. "A Poor SkaTe/^ 




TENNIS TOURNAMENT. 

The men's doubles in the tennis tournament 
will be played soon. The drawings resulted as 
follows : Lovewell and Blunt vs .Leuchtenburg 
and Crabtree, Parsons and Brehaut vs. Doane and 



rfv*-' 




J. H. NASH 
Winner of Tennis Singles. 



Y. M. C. A. 25, CUTLER 24. 

The game Monday evening with the Y. M. C. A. 
was very encouraging to the Cutler team. Play- 
ing against older and more experienced men and 
yet 'holding down the score so close as it was, 
means that when we get together we will be able 
to turn out a very swift team. However, the 
first team must have good, consistent practice 
against the strongest second team in Cutler before 
we will have reached the standard necessary. The 
game was very clean throughout, and the playing 
swift and furious. All the Cutler team played 
well, but especially Allebrand and Dickerman. 
The crowds of Cutler people in the gallery was 
also quite an encouragement to the players. Let 
us see you there often ! 



REPLIED IN KIND. 

Every one knows of the college student who, 
when he, was "hard up," sent home a set of verses 
to which the governor replied in kind. The son 
penned : 

The rose is red. 

The violet blue, 
Send me fifty 
P. D. Q. 
This was the reply: 

The rose is red 

And sometimes pink, 
I'll send you fifty, 
I don't think. 

— New York Times. 



fHB TiCEk. 



TIGER NOTES 



Professor T. A. Jenkins, of the University of 
Chicago, chairman of the Romance section of the 
Modern Language Association of America, has 
asked Professor Hills to be present at the meet- 
ing this month and lead the discussion as to 
Spanish. Professor Hills has had to decline the 
proffered honor, as he is Chairman of the Foreign 
Modern Language section of the Colorado Teach- 
ers' Association, and will have to be present at 
the meeting in Denver. 

Colorado College will be well represented at the 
annual meeting of the State Teachers' Associa- 
tion, which meets in Denver December 27 to 30. 
Professor Parsons is a member of the Educational 
Council, and he will also read a paper before 
the College and High School section, Wednesday 
the 28th, at 8 130 A. M. The title of his paper is, 
"What the College Has a Right to Expect from 
the High School in the Study of English." The 
Science section and the Foreign Modern Lan- 
guage section meet Thursday forenoon. Professor 
Shedd is President of one section, and Professor 
Hills is President of the other. At the meeting 
o' Foreign Modern Language section. Professor 
A-hlers will read a paper on "William Tell." 
Thursday evening has been given over to the For- 
eign Modern Language section, and two plays 
will be presented, one by the Alliance Francaise, 
and the other by the Deutsche Damen of Denver. 

B. (in German B) — Oh, woe! This is hard. 
Prof. Ahlers — It seems so. 

Reward offered for the capture of thief who 
stole Miss Taylor's laundry. 



used, the seven letters constituting a "book." 
Dainty refreshments were served. 

No more of P6e's Tales for Montgomery Soph- 
omores ! 

Montgomery porch served as "scenery" for a 
well-known photographer Saturday noon. 

The Freshmen at McGregor have their trunks 
packed already. 

Miss Woodruff of the Institute entertained all 
the Greeley girls in College at a Thimble party 
Saturday afternoon. 

A number of students saw "Rip Van Winkle" 
a: the Opera House Saturday night. 

Miss Miriam Carpenter will spend the holidays 
with Miss Evelyn Schuler in Raton, N. M. 

Miss Grace Dudley entertained a number of 
the College girls at a taffy pull Friday evening. 

Miss Ada Freeman was the guest of Miss Edith 
Hall for dinner Sunday. 

Exams begin January i6th. Take heed, ye in- 
nocent Freshmen. 

Miss Sammons will spend the holidays with 
friends in Denver. 

The wheel rack at the west entrance of Palmer 
Hall is a great improvement. Now for larger 
racks at the main entrance. 



Crothers and Lieb attended the State Y. M. 
C. A. convention at Boulder. They report a fine 
time, but still think there is no place like home. 

Merry Christmas. 

Miss Haynes and Miss Porter have been called 
home by illness in the family. Both expect to 
return after Christmas. 

Get your dollar ready for the Class subscription 
to the Athletic fund. 

Miss lone Montgomery, assisted by Misses Mc- 
Dowell and Dubach, entertained the new members 
of Hypatia at a delightful tea Saturday afternoon. 
Progressive pit was played, only instead of the 
regulation cards the letters of "Hypatia" were 



There are still some College Calendars on sale. 
Get one. 

In honor of the Day of Prayer there are no 
classes this morning during the last two periods. 

Oh, my! 

The Minerva Function Wednesday was a most 
elegant affair. 

All of the literary societies except Pearsons 
have adjourned their regular meetings till after 
vacation. 

Our wonderful climate is at its best now. 
Skating and tennis are being enjoyed at the 
same time by different students. 



fHE fld^R 



Rip seems very much alive these days, 
may make up for it later. 



He 



Don't go home without a half dozen Calen- 
dars. 

Don't forget the double cuts just before and 
after vacation. 

Doane, Nash and Goldfrank furnished the 
musical part of the program at the Freshman- 
Sophomore contest in a most acceptable manner. 
Before long we may hear of their starting on a 
tour of the country as boy wonders. 



Everybody come ! The inter-society debate 
January 6. The most intensely exciting event of 
the year. 

Lieb was compelled to go home Monday aft- 
ernoon on account of sickness (his own). 



NOTICE. 



Dr. Parsons will deliver his illustrated lecture 
on Oxford, Tuesday evening, January 3, in Per- 
kins. Admission free. It has pleased others ; it 
will please you. 



^f^f^f^f^f^f^S0^^^f^f^f4f^f^^ 



EXCHANGES 



ONE WAY TO FOIL HIM. 

"Hold up yer hands !" 

The stocky looking man thus addressed made 
an effort to comply, but gave it up. 

"I can't," he said. "I've got rheumatism in 
both of my arms. You'll have to go through me 
just as I stand." 

The footpad, still holding the revolver at his 
head, drew him further into the shadow. 

"Where's yer wad ?" he sternly demanded. 

"It's sev.ed up inside my shirt," the victim re- 
plied. 

"Off with that coat and vest, then !" 

"I'll have to be helped off with 'em. I can't do 
it to save my life." 

The footpad unbuttoned the overcoat and pulled 
it off. 

There was a shorter overcoat under that, and 
it unbuttoned hard, but he got it off at last. 

But there was still another coat, equally hard to 
loosen. 

"Dang ye !" muttered the highwayman. "Whal 
do ye wear so many clothes for?" 

"That's my wife's idea. She says it helps my 
rheumatism." 

The coat was skinned off with much trouble, 
and the next garment was a thick vest with eight 
buttons 

The exdsperated footpad removed this only to 
find another vest. 

Taking this off with a burst of muffled profan- 
ity he found a woolen sweater under it. 

"You'll have to piill this up over my head," said 
the other. "There are two shirts under it, and 
m.y money is sewed up inside the very last — hey, 
policeman ! Here's a holdup !" 

For his quick ear had caught the measured 
tread of a No. 13 shoe just around the corner of 



the alley in which all this was going on. 

By the speediest kind of work the footpad got 
away. 

"Officer," said the belated pedestrian a moment 
later, "please help me on with these duds again, 
will you .''" — Exchange. 



TROUBLE IN THE FLAT. 

"Madam, I've come on behalf of the families 
living on the floor just below yours to ask if 
you can't persuade your daughter to be a little 
less industrious at the piano. She pounds it all 
day long and nearly half the 'night, and we're 
getting tired of it. Can't you — " 

"Indeed ! Then you don't like music !" 
"We don't object to music, madam. It is your 
dai Khter's playing we are kicking about." — Bx- 



EXCHANGES. 



"Sweet Kitty, tell me why a kiss 
Is like creation?" Lost in mood 

Perpiext, she could not answer this : 
Or — would not, if she could. 

As one who had not much to fear. 
He grasped her hand, ande nearer stood 

"Because, 'tis made from nothing, dear, 
And — God knows it's good." 



Students, if in need of glasses or repairs on 
same, see A^nby, the Optical Jeweler, the oldest 
established in the county. You will find every- 
thing right. 



THE TIGER. 



If 



EXCHANGES 



HOPE. 

Through the dim and wavering vapor 
Comes a gleam of distant light 

That breaks upon the darkness 
As the dawn upon the night. 

For my soul is worn and weary 
And my heart cries out in pain 

As I think how great the toiling, 
How little is the gain. 

— The Heraldo. 



"He's quite a star as an after-dinner speaker, 
isn't he?" 

"Star? He's a regular moon! He becomes 
brighter the fuller he gets." 

Visitor — How does the land lie out this way? 
Native — It ain't the land that lies, sir; it's the 
land agents. 

He sipped the nectar from her lips, 
As under the tree they sat, 



And wondered if any fellow 

E'er drank from a mug like that. 

He — You are the first girl I ever loved. 
She — Darling, I believe you ! 
He — Heavens! You are the first girl that ever 
told me that. 

The Juniors are like kerosene lamps, 

They aren't especiall bright ; 

They are often turned down, seldom trimmed, 

And frequently go out at night. 

Teacher (in third grade, nature study) — Why 
can a fly walk on the ceiling or on smooth glass? 
Johnny — He has awfully sharp toenails. 

Bill had a bill board; Bill also had a board 
bill. The board bill bored Bill so that Bill sold 
the bill board to pay his board bill. — Case Tech. 

Dr. Gideon — What is an appendix? 
Small Boy — It's a — well, it's a different thing 
ill a different place. 




t$- 



The tiCHR 



WaTCHES, DIAMONDS 




A Special Discount of 10 per cent, to all Students 



Zehner's 

Successors to 

Goodspeed & Co. 
i26 P. P. ave. 

The 'bery latest in 

Brooches, Stick Pins, 

Sterling Silver 

Novelties 



College Pillow Tops for 
CKristma^s 

ASHFORD «l ROBERTS 

^yirt and ,ytationery Co. 

126 N. TejoA 

t5 per cent discount to students on frsLtning 



When in doubt, take the safe side. 
Send bundles to, the 

Colorado Springs Laundry 



Est. 20 yrs. 



Ralph Rice, College Agt. 



Bookkeeping 
Shorthand 
Typewriting 



CENTRAL 



!^, 



usiness 



College 



College Estab- 
lished in 
Denver in 1887 



L. A. ARNOLD, Pres. J. C. CROY, Prin. 

Nichols Block, IS and 20 S. Tejon St., 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Rooms inviting, Work Thorough, Teachers up-to-date 



Call or Write for Information. 



*TME COLORADO ROAD. 







If you Want 

The "Best, 

The Quickest, 
The Mo^f 

Sa.ti>s factory 



Line to Denver or Pueblo buy a Colo- • 
rado & Southern Ticket. Get them at 
City Office, I ^ N. Tejon. 

J. M.' SPRINGER, Commercial Agent. 
Come in and ask questions. 



THE TIGER 



13 



WHEN IN NEED OE CLOTHING, HATS 
OR EIRNISHINGS 

We would suggest that you consult your 

professor as to the best place lo go 

We are willing to abide by their 

judgement as they all trade 

with us. We give spe- 

ial discount to students 

The B. W. DAVIS CLOTHING & EIR- 
NISHING CO., 102 N, Tejon St- 



The Williamson=Haffner 
Engraving Company 



1633 Arapahoe Street 



DENVER 



DENTIST 



IS South TJejon St. 



G. W. Pauly, B. S., D. O. Mrs. Lona E. Pauly, B. S. D. O. 

Graduates of A. T. Still's College of Osteopathy, 

Kirksville, Mo. 

DR. & MRS. PAULY, '^fg^^I^i'' 

Office, rooms 303-304 DeGraff Bldg. 118 N. Tejon St., Colo- 
rado Springs, Colo. Ph .nes— Office Ked 1272; Res. Red 323 
Hours 8 to 12 a. m., 1 to 5 p. m. 



F* H* Weeks 

26 East Bijou ^i. 

Photographs taken any hour 
of the day or evening by 
flashlight. Especially suit- 
able for groups. Call and see 
samples. 

Special Rates t) StivdeAts 



next 



You are next to a good hair cut or shave when you patronize 



The Manhattan Barber Shop, J. R. WEYMAR, Prop. 3o e. bijou 



WHITAKER & GARDNER 

30 N. TEJON ST. 

Headqtiartcrs for 


^pI^HS5?v 


eolleqe Shoes 

OF EVERY DESCRIPTION 

We have the best mining and civil engineering boot 
in the m.irket 

WHITAKER & GARDNER 


THE STAR is the leader for prompt 
and satisfactory service. 

SPECIAL RATES to students of col- 
lege and academy 

S. E. BENNETT, College Ag't. 


CHARLES P. BENNETT 


w. I. Lceas 




Columbia, Hartford, Rambler, Ideal & Tribune Bicycles 


Real Estate, Loans 
and Insurance,^ ^ 

NO. 5 PIKE'S PEAK AVENUE 


The only first-class re air shop in town. Chainless wheels 
a specialty. Wheels for rent. Phoue 517-1 1 29 N. Tejon 

Students wishing a Special Course in Drawing, 
Water Colors, Oil or China Pjinting"? should call 
at Art Studio, 108 N. Tejon MARIE R. FORBISH, 
Member of Art Institute, Chicago. 



For Cut Glass, Hand Painted China, Silverware, 

Watches and Jewelry, see 

LaUTERMAN, Optical Jewelry, 121 N. Tejon 



REPAIRING A SPECIALTY. 



J4 



THE TIGER 



' 








Colorado Coflege 




THE OLDEST INSTITUTION FOR 




HIGHER FDUCATION IN THE WEST 




FOUNDED AT COLORADO 




SPRINGS IN 18 74 




Colorado College now offers advantages of the same 




grade as the best institutions. 






For information concerning Courses of Study, Rooms 






and Board, Physical Culture, etc., apply to 






WM. F. SLOCUM, President, 






or EDWARD S. PARSONS, Dean. 






For information in regard to the College Department of 






Music, inquire of 






EDWARD S. PARSONS, Dean. 

Those wishing information as to the Courses in Drawing, 
Painting, Designing, etc., etc., inquire of 






EDWARD S. PARSONS, Dean. 

For information concerning the Engineering Depart- 
ment, apply to 

FLORIAN CAJORI, 




' 


Dean cf Engineering School. 




Cutler Academy 


Cutler Academy is the Associated Prepartory School of 




Colorado College, in which students are prepared for any 




' 


American College. Address, 






M. C. GILE, Principal. 











The tiger. 



IS 



The Albert Sechrist Manufacturing Co. 

WILL INSTALL GAS and 
ELECTRIC FIXTURES 




in your residence at Colorado Springes 
same price as Denver, without extra 
charg-e. Call and select your fixtures, 
or will send you a catalog;ue. 




'Uhe line that sutt'f them all," 



Going Away for 
Christmas? 

If so, the best road to travel is 



Via 



^/?e 




Colorado Midland 



RaLilwaLy 



Reaches Cripple Creek, Buena Vista, Leadville, Aspen, 
Grand Junction and the West. 

Personally conducted California tours each week. 

R. T. DUNWAY, C. P. & T. A. 
C. H. SPEERS, Colorado Springs H. C. BUSH, 

Gen. Pass. Agent Traffic Manager. 

DENVER, COLO. 



^ XOcLgon Load of ^ ^ 

Ne^w^ Wood Type 

Atiii Other Macteriacls 

OfthcOery Latent at your T>Uposal_for 

Wifvdow Carrels 
Tickets, Flyers etc 

E^ JSf CRA \^ IJV C — C he rinest 

The Telegraph Job Rooms 119 e. p. p. Ave. 

Ask wKere TKe Tiger is Printed 



The ©Id 

Surio Store 

Wholesale and Retail 
Dealers in 

GENUINE INDIAN GOODS AND 
CURIOSITIES 

J. S. CANDELARIO, Prop, 

301 and 303 San Francisco Street, 

SANTA FE, N. M. 



NEW EMPIRE THEATRE 3 shows Daily ^ l Matinee 3 P. M. 
" Evenings 7:30 and 8:45 



IOC 



■VAUDEVILLE- 



IOC 



i6 



THE TIGER 



El Paso Cleanings Tailoring Co> 

10 E. Kiowa St. Phone Main 667=A Colo. Springs 



Pressing 
Cleaning 



Dyeing 
Repairing 



Alte ing 
Tailoring 



ElectroJhermatoriuni Bath Parlors 

124 SoutN Tejon Street 

Hot Air, Electric and Turkisli Baths, Electric 

Light, Salt Glow and Packs. 

COLLINS & CO., Props. 



Office Phone 309-B 



Residence Plione Red 87 



DR. HARRY L. MOREHOUSE 



DENTIST 



Hours 9-12, 1:30-5 



First Nat'l Bank BIdg., room 8 



C. F. Arcularius & Co. 
Jewelers 

Diamonds and Watches 

Fine Jewelry Manufacturing 

9 South Tejon St. Colorado Springs 



The 



Crissey & Fowler Lumber 
Company 



Phone 101 



117 to 123 West Vermijo Ave. 



Phone 540 

■Monarch Hand 
Laundry 

421 S, Tejon 

KARL L. IV10HLER, Prop. 
W. J. WALLRICH, College Agt. 

WE LaUXOER aiVYTHING 

FINE CHOCOLATE BON BONS 



^^ 



Name on every Piece 

Ice Cream, Hot and Cold 

Sodas 

Fresh Candies madeexery hour 



UNION ICE AND COAL COMPANY 

W. M. BANNING, Prop. 



Coal» mood and Tee 

Dealers in all kinds of Coal and Artificial and 
Natural Ice 

Yard Office, 105 W. Vermijo Ave. City Office, 5 N. Tejon 




JOHIV MOFFAT 

Tine Cailoring 

Repairing, Cleaning, Pressing. Special rates to 
College Students 

Over Waiting's Book Store 16 South Tejon St. 



Carriages, Cabs, 

'Busses, Baggage and 

Transfer Wagons 

Office, 15 North eascade 



Denver Law School 

Law Department of the 
University of Denver 

Three years' course leading to the degree of 
Bachelor of Laws. Courses in Mining and Irri- 
gation Law. Full resident faculty. For informa- 
tion address 

LUCIUS W. HOYT, Dean 

Ernest & Cranmer Bidg., Denver, Colo. 

Did You Know 

That our stock of package crackers is so 
great in its variety that you could have a 
change for every day for more than two 
months and yet not exhaust our list? Well, 
it's a fact. We have a kind for every pos- 
sible time and occasion — and they are all 
good. Finest bakery goods in the city. 
Fancy Groceries 

W. N. BURGESS, 112 N. Tejon St. 

Titsworth & Davidson 
DAIRY 

2 MILES S. E. or COLORADO SPRINGS. P. 0. BOX 6 

The HoMck'Davidson Coal and Transfer Co. 

Dealers In 

CANON CITY, MAITLAND 

AND LIGNITE COAL 

Phone 473-B. Office US N. Tejon. P. O. Box 257 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 



4>4*«i*4'4>*i>«i*4*«i*4'4*<i*4'4*4*4>«i>4>4*4'4*4>4>«i'4><i'4*4*4*<i'4**i'4*4'4>4*4><i'4*4*4i4>4'*i'4'«i' 

* ♦ 

* See 

* 



'She Gowdy-Simmons Printing Company 

FOR WINDOW CARDS, TICKETS, ETC. ENGRAVED 
CARDS AND INVITATIONS ON SHORT NOTICE 



2/ 9forth ♦ 

TJejon Si. if 

•I* 



YEB WING 

eniXESE AXD JAPANESE 
FfllWeV GOODS 



24 E. Kiowa St. 



♦ S. JAMES & SON, Props, 

4i 
•I* 
4* 

4* 



Colorado Springs, Colo. 



THE DERN TEA AND COFFEE CO. ♦ 

Dealers in TEAS, COFFEES, SPICES, * 



EXTRACTS, BAKING POWDERS, Etc. 



Phone 575 



29 S. Tejon St. ^ 



The PeopIe^s Grocery and Market 



PHONE MAIN 868 




222 EAST PIKE'S PEAK 



Colorado Springs, Colorado ♦ 



ST. JOHN & BARNES 

Oldest and largest plumbing and heating 

establishment in city. Your 

patronage solicited 



•fi Telephone 13 



206 N. Tejon St. 



Phone Main 151 



Established 1897 



D. W. SMITH 

FAMILY GROCER, TEA AND 
COFFEE MERCHANT . : : : : 
Orders Called for and Promptly Delivered 

717 N. Weber St. Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Say ^'PICTOU^' 

To your dealer when you order 

Maitland Coal 

If he can't give it to you 

WE CAN 

The Colorado Springs 

X^Uei \aO* Thone^ 230—213 



For Goodness Sake^^ 

Use TUDOR lower vein Coal 
It beats all other Lignite 

TUDOR COAL COMPANY, Cor. Cascade and Cucharas 

(Ask your dealer for 

VICTOR 



Athletic 
Supplies 




HELP THE TIGER 

by buying 

Scott Bicycle Tites 

Write iss if yoa cannot get them of 
yot^r dealer. 

THE SCOTT SUPPLY & TOOL CO. 

DENVER, COLO. 



USE ELECTRIC LIGHT 
IN YOUR HOMES 



The Colorado Springs Electric Co. t 



4*4*4^*1*4*4*4*4**1**1**1*4*4*4**1* *i*4* 4* 4* 4* *!* 



4*4*4*4*4'4*4*4*4*4**i*4*4*4*4* 



4* 
4*4*4*4*4 



4* 



THe Yo^ifi^ Men^s Store. 



GOING HOME FOR. CHRISTMAS? 



4* 
4f 
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You'll want !o take some present home for father or brother, won't 



you 



You can have the College discount on anything you want from 
our store. It's likely that our assortment is much larger than you would 
find at your own home. 



SPECIAL DISCOUNT 
TO ALL STUDENTS 



HOLBROOK & PERKINS 



THE DENVER FIRE CLAY CO. 

MANUFACTIRERS OF 
AND DEALERS IN 

Chemical and Physicial Apparatus and Chemicals 

A FDLL LINE OF LABORATORY SIPPLIES AND ASSAY GOODS 
Write for Illustrated Catalogues 



4- 1742-1746 Champa Street, 



DENVER, COLORADO 



^^ci^ iPhotoffraphs 



at BINGHSM & WOOD'S, 18 S. Tejon 



H. C. COLBURN, Pres. E. A. COLBURN, Jr., Sec'y and Treas. 

The ^yifYtterj! ^yititomobile Co. 

LIVER. Y, STORAGE. REPAIRING 

Telephone Main 122 S-IO J^, J^e'Oada A-Ve. Colorado Springs, Colo, 




O. E. HEMENWAY 



Groceries and Meats 



4> ♦ ♦ ♦ •!• ♦ 4* 4' 



nS South Tejon St 
Colorado Springs^ Colorado 

4»4*«l»4**i'*i>«i"i'4'4*<i*4>*i*4*4'4'4*4*4'«i'4*4*<i*4' 



4* 

4» 
* 



4* 4* 4> 4> 4> <!• ♦ 4* ♦ 





O/O ^^^^^ 



'^^ 



£H£ TIGBR 



Colorado College 



\ 




/ 



JANVAItY 12tK, 1905 

J^umber 15. 



\rOL\/ME, VII. 



♦ 

4> 
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♦ 

4» 
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4* 

4* 

♦ 
4* 

4* 
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4* 
« 

4* 



4>4*4*4*4'4>4*4>4>4*4*4>4*4*4*4*4»4*4»4>4*4*. 

Special Kates to Students 

On Rented Pianos 




The KNIGHT -eHMPBELL 
Music Company 



Hew Lennox Block 



Opposite North Park 



St. John Bros.r"'"'™™' 

Gas and Steam Fitters 

Hot Water Heating a Specialty 

Prompt attention given to Repair Work. 

Curtis goal go. 

Office 132 N. Tejon St. Telephone 91. 

Try "NEW RANGE" for the Kitchen, $4.00. 
BITUMNOUS COAL AT STANDARD PRICES. 



SELDOMRIDGE BROTHERS, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

Flour, Feed, Grain, Hay and Seeds 

108 South Tejon Street 

Repairing while You Wait Satisfaction Guaranteed 

A complete plant of New Machinery for 
the Manufacture of Fine Boots and Shoes 

The Lightning Shoe Shop 

BROWN & COMPANY 
We make a specialty of Shoes to Measure and Shoes for 
Cripples. 28Vi North Tejon St. Colobado Springs 

Visiting Cards in Latest Styles. 



WE SHOW gy advertising in THE TIGER that 
YOU........... appreciate your custom. 

The Prompt Printery 



we 
lur custom. 
22 E.Kiowa St. ^ ^ 

NEW : EMPIRE : THEATRE 

«0c VAUDEVILLE lOc 

3— SHOWS DAILY— 3 
I Matineei 3 p. m. Evenings, 7:30 and 8:45. 



Elegant 



«i*«4i4*4*4>4»<»4*'i*4*«*i'4i4'«i*4**i*4>4"i*4'<» 

Pfininc Artistic in Posing, J 
1 IIUIUO Lighting and Finish ♦ 

Discount to Students ♦ 




^^ 



Phone 679-a 
Corner Cascade and Kiowa 



COLLEGE GOWNS, CAPS 

The Best Workmanship 
at Lowest Prices 

Silk Faculty Gowns and Hoods 




COX SONS & VININC I 

262 Fourth Avenue., NEW YORK 



SKATES 

Hockey Sticks 

^5lSWEHTERS 

Basket Ball and 
Y. M. e. H. Suits 

at Strangs 

119 Xorth Teion Street 

Mueth's 

Soda, Ice 6ream 

eATERING 

CHAS. T. FERTIG 

'^al Estate, Loans and Insurance 

29 N. Tejon Street 

ZjAe Colorado Springs ^iorai Co* 

FLORISTS 



/O'^ ^ortA "Uo/Ofi Straat 



* 



4. DOVCI^AS est HETHeiUNGTOM I 

J Architect 4^ * 

^ Phone 556-B Rooms 15-16 Outwest Building, Colorado Springs, Colo. * 

4>4>4>4'4*4*««i*<i'«4>4»4'«i*«i*4>*»4>4*4*'»4*<t>*i»4»*i**i*4»«l*4»4»4**i>4*4>4**i'*i>4>4»4**i*4>4*«i**l' 



THE TIGER 



Student's Book Store Books, stationery; air Engi- 

neer's Supplies; College Pins 



and Watch Fobs, 
and up. 



Century Fountain Pens $1 to $4, Waterman's $2.50 

REYER & PLATT. 



For $1 00 per month ' ^"'^ Sponged and Pressed each week 

— ^ PANTATORIIM. 

17 East Bijou, Branch Office opp. Plaza Hotel. 



THE COLORADO SPRINGS CO. 

The Original Locators of 

Colorado Springs and Tlfanitou 

is still offering for sale choice 
lots on North Weber Street 
and North Wahsatch Avenue 

Also lots for sale in other parts of Colorado Springs 
and in Manitou 

Apply at ROOMS, OUTWEST BUILDING 

LOUIS STOCK 

Office and Works, 13 E. Kiowa St. 

TELEPHONE 452-A 

Cleaning, Dyeiug, Scouring in all its branches 

Ostrich Plumes Cleaned, Dyed and Curled 

Kid Gloves Dyed and Cleaned. 

GIDDINGS BROS. 

Fine Dress Goods and Ladies' 
TAILOR Suits, Ladies' 
^"^ Furnishings 

Kiowa ^nd Tejon Streets. 



We do Everything in the Tailoring 
Line 

J. B, CORRIN 

103 E. Bijou SL COLORADO SPRINGS, COLO. 

D, E. MONROE & CO. 
Prescription Druggist 

The best of Drugs, Stationery and Toilet Articles 

NO LIQUORS SOLD. 
eor. Teion S( Biiou Pbone 311 Sf 331 

THE HEFLEY-ARCULARIUS DRUG CO. 
Drudfifsts 

Kodaks, Cameras and all kinds of Photographic 
Supplies. Developing and Printing for Amatuers. 
Free Delivery. 
Phone 144 21 South Tejon Street 



Hardware Bicycles 

a. S. BLSKE 

New Chainless Bicycle $35 and $20 

Rambler, Orient and National Automobiles 

Best Kepair Shop in eity 107 n. €eioti 

nirs^ B* R* brooks 

Coilet Parlors at 20 6a$t Hiowa 

Also Room 52, Antlers Hotel 

No Apprentices. Only experienced help employed. 

A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 

Largest Manufacturers in the World of Official 
Athletic Supplies 

BASE BALL, BASKET BALL, GOLE, BOXING GLOVES, 
STRIKING B\GS, GYMNASIUM GOODS. 

Spalding's Trade Mark goods are the acme of perfection*; 
accept no goods that are not the Spalding kind ; there is nO 
substitute for a Spalding article. 5 

Every base ball manager should send at once for a copy 
of Spalding's Spring and Summer Ct-talogue. It's free. ', 

Spalding's Athletic Almanac for 1905. Price 10 Ctsy 
per copy j 

A. G. SPALDING & BROS. ' 

New York, Chicago, Denver, San Francisco, St. Louis 

HENRY TAMM 

Druggist 

PRESCRIPTIONS 
TOILET ARTICLES \ 
STATIONERY i 

All Popular Drinks Served 
at our Soda Fountain 

Plaza Dotel, Cor. Cache la Poadre & Tejon Sts. 

THE RUeBY=PRIMROSE COAL CO. 

All Kinds of Fuel 

Phone 481-A West 44-A 21 N. TEJON ST. 



H.KRANZ 



p©ReELaiN 
H. KRHNZ & 



F. R. SMITH 



Only S Chair Barber Shop in the City 

106'/2 B. Pike*s Peak Ave. 



BaTH TUBS 

e©., Barbers 

Try the f lectric Vibrassage Machinfi 
eOLORADO SPRINGS. eOLG. 



THE TIGBR. 



DR.. SCHADT 

SPECIALTY PRACTICE 

The Scientific Examination of your eyes and fitting of 
glasses. Special Discount to students. Consultation free. 
Office — 303 Colorado Bldg., corner Tejon and Huerfano Sts. 

Zehner Jewelry Co^^ 

26 Pike's Peak Avenue. 

CT||nFWTQ__ We have a fine assortment of g-oods 
OIULFCI^IC? on hand. CALL AND SEE THEM 

We sell a GOOD FOUNTAIN PEN for $i 

WHITNEY & GRIMWOOD 

Opera House Building 

We are agents for WATERMAN'S IDEAL FOUNTAIN 
Pens. Prices from $2.50 up. 



^red S. jffaj/ner 

Watchmaker and Jeweler 

15 fSouih Uej'on Si. 




AND 




1739 Champa St., DENVER, COLO, 



THE COLORADO ROAOT 




^^'O/r^ooiSouwt^*''"* 



Come in and a^K. questions 



"Frenzied Finance" does not include invest- 
ments in Colorado & Southern Railway tickets, 
but on the other hand you are certain of good 
returns, which are bound to please and satisfy 
you. 



Avoid the last moment's worry, caused by pur- 
chasing tickets at Depot, by coming; in at the New 
city office, No. 119 E. Pike's Peak, and let us fix 
you out the day before. Money back if ticket is 
not used. Remember that. 

J. H. Springer, 
Commercial Ag-ent. 



PHOTOGRAPHS at Popular Pdces 

at MERRICK'S, 30 SOUTH TEJON ST. 

If you want to give pictures to college friends it will not be so expensive if you have your work done here. 

FRANK H, SMALL watches, Diamonds, fine Watch Work. Special 
Jeweler and Silversmith Price to Students. 113 Pike's Peak Ave. 



Vhe TIGCR 



Vol. VII. 



COLORADO COLLEGE, JANUARY 12, 1905. 



*No. 15 



THE INTERSOCIETY DEBATE 



The campus of Colorado College sees many 
sirenuous deeds and strenuous moments. The 
annual joint debate between the Pearsons Society 
and the Apollonian Club was a magnificent ex- 
ample of the right kind of College spirit and the 
keenest kind of College rivalry. 

Friday night witnessed the sides of Perkins 
Hall decorated with the respective colors of 
Pearsons and Apollo and amid an enthusiastic 
dm the men of each society seated themselves 
on the side that bore their colors. Pearsons 
marched to their places singing the Pearsons song. 
The men of Apollo entered with lock step and the 
traditional Apollo yell. Once seated the rival 
warriors tore large holes in the circumambient at- 
mosphere with their yells, interspersed with the 
society songs, whose purport was that they and 
they alone were the people and virtue would de- 
part with them. 

Dr. T. K. Urdahl presided and introduced the 
speakers. The question debated was : 

"Resolved, That a system of subsidies, other 
than the present mail subsidies, should be adopted 
b> the United States for the encouragment of our 
ocean-carrying and ship-building trades." 

Pearsons supported the affirmative with R. L- 
Givens, H. Roberts and M. C. Hall. Apollo sus- 
tained the negative with G. C. Lake, T. Hunter 
and V. E. Keyes. The decision of the judges, C. 
L. McKesson, R. L. Hubbard and Robert Kerr 
was unanimous for Apollo. 

A fierce wild yell of joy smote the air and 
Apollo rushed from the hall to form and march 
to McRae's Cafe, at which place a memorable 
session was held and much was said and done. 

Pearsons' grit withstood their defeat in a most 
manly manner, and they marched out singing as 
they had come in. Of the six annual joint de- 
bates between Apollo and Pearsons, Pearsons has 
won three and Apollo three. The arguments of all 
the speakers are briefly summarized as follows : 



In opening the debate Mr. Givens laid aside 
the question of definition, leaving it to come out 
in the course of the debate. His line of argu- 
ment centered about the importance of the ques- 
tion of ship subsidies. Does the present condi- 
tion of our merchant marine demand the atten- 
tion of the American people? In 1812 we carried 
90 per cent of our own shipping; now we carry 
but 9.1 per cent. Much of this, even, is in our 
coastwise trade, so that the condition is even 



worse than is apparent on the face of the figures. 
What are the conditions which lead to this con- 
dition? The Civil War was responsible for a 
great decrease in the commerce of the United 
States, especially as carried on in our own ships. 
The financial difficulties of the next 10 years 
made matters worse. Before i860 wooden ships 
were used exclusively, while after that time steel 
ships came into use. England produced steel 
cheaper than we could, so gained on us. Congress 
neglected the affairs of commerce at that time, 
so the condition was not remedied. In the 40 
years since the war we have become the first na- 
tion in the world in other branches of industry, 
and should not be behind in this. Shipping will 
not revive unaided. Something must be done. 



Mr. G. C. Lake opened the argument for the 
negative. After carefully defining the question, 
h( showed that the past decline of the marine 
had been due to economic conditions rather than 
to any lack of government aid. These conditions 
were first the invention of the iron ship by Eng- 
and and the inability of the United States to com- 
pete with her in building such ships ; second, the 
Civil War, which in five years reduced American 
shipping a million and a quarter tons ; third, im- 
mediately after the war shipbuilding materials 
were higher here than in Europe, and fourth, the 
absorption of capital by great internal develop- 
ments. 

He then showed that now economic conditions 
are in favor of the American, for, first, we have 
the second largest merchant marine in the world ; 
second, this marine is rapidly increasing ; third, 
back to and including 1898 there has been an 
increase in the amount of exports and imports 
carried in American bottoms. 

Before further aiding the marine, he said, it 
would be well to consider that our marine is al- 
ready amply aided. First, as regards the ship- 
builder, (i) no vessel is allowed to engage in 
coastwise trade unless built in American 3^ards ; 
(2) since 1884 shipbuilding materials have been 
admitted free of duty; (3) all government naval 
contracts are given to American builders. Second, 
as regards shipowners. In 1891 Congress passed 
a postal act under which we are annually paying 
large sums of money for carrying of the mails. 

In conclusion, Mr. Lake showed that there were 
inherent evils in a system of subsidies which 
should condemn it, for : First, it is unconstitu- 



THE TIGER. 



tional, since no power is given for it in the con- 
stitution; second, it promotes corruption, as is 
shown by our experience with the Pacific Mail 
S. S. Co.; third, it is unjust, for it necessitates 
the taking of money from the whole people and 
turning it over to our shipbuilders and ship- 
owners. 

In continuing the debate for the affirmative 
Mr. Rob rrti ; rgued as follows : 

Since we must do something for the aid of pur 
marine, th^ ruestion now becomes, what foira 
shall this aid take. A consideration of all possi- 
ble means of aid, including free registry, gove.- 1- 
ment ownership, present mail subsidy, and others, 
shows that nc form of aid except some system of 
subsidy other than our present mail system can 
be satisfying. In the light of the experience cf 
other nations with subsidies, and of our own ex- 
exprience with other subsidies, we of the affirm- 
ative conclude that we may justly expect such a 
system of subsidies to be satisfactory and give 
us the marine we demand. 

Hunter, continuing the argument for the nega- 
tive, showed that the leading legal opinion of 
the question was to exclude all mail subsidy 
whatsoever. A consideration of the poicy of the 
various European countries, proved that the 
American labors under no disadvantage as re- 
gards foreign subsidized marines, for in the first 
place, the payments of the two largest countries 
are not in reality subsidies, but are rather simply 
given as a remuneration for service rendered. 

In the second place, the countries that do sub- 
sidize, such as France and Italy, have failed of 
success. Here the speaker made use of a graphic 
chart, compiled from the Commissioner of Navi- 
gation's report, to show that subsidy has proven 
too impracticable when tried, and that maritime 
supremacy is dependent upon economic conditions 
and not upon government aid. Because of this 
objection, together with the objections arising 
from the unconstitutionality, corruotion and in- 
justice of such a measure, even those who believe 
in protection do not favor it. 

Marine protectionists today favor our former 
policy of discriminating duties and tonnage taxes, 
a policy which is constitutional, just and practic- 
able. Furthermore a system of subsidies is in- 
adequate and could give no relief, since it is im- 
possible of adoption. 

The leading economists and statesmen of the 
country are opposed to it. It has not sufficient 
backing in Congress ever to become a law, and 
neither of the great political parties favor such 
a plank in their platforms. And finally, subsidy, 
while lacking all the advantages of a discrim- 
inating duty policy, is not free from any of its 
objections. 



MR. HALL. 

The chart presented by the negative can only 
mean that when you pay people to engage in an 
already profitable business, it ceases to be profita- 
ble. Such a conclusion is absurd. 

Contrary 'to the statements' of the' negative, 
England does subsidize her marine, paying more 
than $4,870,000 in mail subsidies, over $662,000 
in general subsidies. Norway also pays $48,000 
as a mail subsidy and much more than that as a 
general subsidy, or $89,000. 

To declare a thing unconstitutional is one of 
the least profitable of all arguments and is 
especially so in this connection, since subsidy 
bills have been passed by Congress and declared 
constitutional by the Supreme Court. 

The affirmative have shown that something 
must be done, that the conditions indicated by 
our carrying from 8.2 per cent to 9.1 per cent of 
our own commerce demand some remedy if we 
are to keep pace at sea with out commercial stand- 
ing on land. 

Having shown that conditions are bad, it de- 
volves upon the affirmative to show that a ship 
subsidy is the remedy and upon the negative 
to show that something else is. 

The second speaker on the negative has shown 
that nothing else is an adequate remedy. 

In regard then to ship subsidies we say, not 
that they are omnipotent, but that they are neces- 
sary for competition with foreign subsidized ma- 
rines. 

They are widely advocated and have the en- 
dorsement of the successful political party at the 
last election and of the nation's executive. 

This makes them worth considering, but they 
are furthermore intended as a protection to the 
industry that stands unique as our one decadent 
and unprotected industry. Whatever evils there 
have been in protection, it has unquestionably 
been efficient in building up our industries. 

What we propose then is a ship subsidy, meaning 
by that a direct pecuniary aid granted to dif- 
ferent classes of vessels in such amounts as will 
enable them to compete successfully with foreign 
vessels of the same class. We believe that a highly 
disproportionate mail subsidy "other than the 
present mail subsidy," might be included here and 
that discriminating duties are such a direct pe- 
cuniary aid, direct, not being specified as to 
payment, but as to aid. However, the affirma- 
tive does not argue for these, but for a directly 
paid subsidy. 

Minister Barrett says ^ye must pay for an effi- 
cient necessary mail service according to its ex- 
pense and attendant difficuties, and we do not 
do this even. 

Looking at the matter historically we find 
Adams, Washington, Jefferson and Madison to 
have upheld discriminating customs duties and 



THE TIGER, 



lonnage dues. We then carried 90 per cent of 
onr commerce. In 1835 England subsidized the 
Cunard, in 1846 the Peninsular. United States 
Consul Wheelwright attempted to get Amer'-an 
aid for a line of steamers and was unsuccesbful. 
England aided him in the establishment of the 
Pacific Ime. 

Says Marvin : "If subsidies had not been with- 
drawn in 1858 by what was virtually a political 
crime, we should have saved our fine steam 
fleet in the North Atlantic, even through the 
war." This refers to the Collins line. Further, 
''Between 1865 and 1890 it would have saved the 
decline that was the price of our policy of neg- 
lect." 

In 1873 a Philadelphia concern wished to run 
a line from Antwerp to Philadelphia. The Umt- 
ed States refused to aid and the line went to 
Belgium, that government paying $100,000 p':r 
\ear for 10 years and p^iving $30,000 dock rights. 
That line is the Red Star line. 

Today we have developed our nation at home 
and our present interest is commercial expansion. 

Minister Barrett says that a marine is necessary 
to our -commercial and friendly relations with 
South America. Argentine merchants can send 
letters to Europe and back in 55 days, to the 
United States and back in 75 to 90 days. Hence 
they trade with Europe. A South American ^']o^: 
would mean greatly increased trade and trave\ 

The development of Japan and our possession 
of the Philippines are logical aids to our suprem- 
acy en the Pacific. Now is our greatest need 
for a marine. A subsid}' is the only way to 
obtain one. 

Mr. V. E. Keyes, in closing for the negative, 
considered he so-called burdens (i, the compe- 
tition of foreign subsidized marines ; 2, the cost 
to the shipowner of operation, and 3, the cost to 
the 'shipbuilder of construction) under which 
the shipping industry is said to labor, and be- 
cause of which it is argued subsidies should be 
given. The competition of foreign subsidized 
marines having already been disposed of by the 
second speaker on the negative, the cost of op- 
eration was first discussed. The three principal 
items of cost in operating a ship are provisions, 
coal and wages. Provisions and coal are as 
cheap in this country as in any place on earth. 
The United States exports large quantities of 
these products to nearly all lands. The matter 
of wages, then is the only item of cost about 
which here can be dispute. In this the American 
shipowner has slight disadvantage, because the 
officers must be citizens of the United States. 
This, however, is relatively insignificant. The 
rest of the crew may be made up of foreigners 
who may be hired at anv oort out of the United 
States for the same pay as given by the vessels 
of other nations, for "it is the rule of the port 



and not the flag of the ship which governs 
wages." So the shipowner is not seriously handi- 
capped. 

The strongest argument for further shipping 
protection is found in the greater expense of 
construction to the the American shipbuilder. 
At present, although the Steel Corporation sells 
large quantities of shipbuilding materials abroad, 
the price of the^ materials is lower there than 
here. This condition, however, is largely reme- 
died by the fact that we may import these goods 
from foreign countries w<ithout paying duties. 
Now, in regard to labor for shipbuilding. Al- 
though it is much better paid here than in Euro- 
pean countries, its higher efficiency, according 
to several authorities, more than compensates 
for the increase in wages. 

Mr. Cramp, America's greatest shipbuilder, tes- 
tified before the Senate Committee, that for Rus- 
sian and Japanese warships he had been able to 
compete with England, France and Germany, be- 
cause of the greater skill of American workmen. 
That the shipbuilders are not suffering is shown 
by their great prosperity. During the past 10 years 
they have constructed a tonnage equal to the 
entire merchant marine of the German Empire, 

Having shown that the shipping industry do^s 
not seriously suffer from the competition of for- 
eign subsidized marine^ or the cost of operation, 
and that the difference in the cost of construc- 
tion between this and other great nations is 
relatively slight, the speaker argued that a system 
of subsidies which is opposed to the spirit of 
the constitution, which fosters corruption and 
which has always proved impractiable, is un- 
called for and that if the United States is to 
adopt any measure of shipping protection it 
should be that of discriminating duties. , 

REBUTTAI,. 

The coastwise trade, so much talked by negative 
is a settled monopoly and not a matter of de- 
batable interest. Its mention is a mere quibble 
to make present bad conditions seem better. 

Subsidies have been called corrupt and unjust — 
was any proof offered? 

England does subsidize. In May, 1903, a con- 
tract with the Cunard line provides that England 
build two steamers, the Cunard Company to pay 
for them in 20 years with interest at 2^ per 
cent, and England to pay £150,000 general sub- 
sidy and i68,ooo mail subsidy annually for 20 
years. 

If economic conditions are better than 20 years 
ago it is not readily demonstrable. 

This is a question of conditions of interna- 
tional competition. All other things being equal 
new and unsubsidized American lines cannot 
compete with established subsidized foreign lines, 
and all other things are approximately equal, or 
favor the foreign line. 



THB TIGER. 



THE TIGER. 

Published weekly during the College year by 
The Tiger Publishing Co., in the interest of Colo- 
rado College. 

J. Y. Crothers Editor-in-Chief 

T. Hunter Assistant Editor-in-Chief 

J. I. Muffley Athletic Editor 

Miriam Carpenter Literary Editor 

Mabel Barbee Alumni Editor 

A. H. Fisher Local Editor 

Bert Wasley Business Manager 

C. A. Hedblom .... Assistant Business Manager 

CORRESPONDENTS: 

Mr. Nash, Miss McDowell, Miss Isham, Miss 
Kidder, Mr. Lamb, Mr. Reeks, Miss Arbuckle. 

Subscription, $1.25 per year, payable in advance. 
Single copy, 5 cents. 

The Tiger is forwarded to all subscribers until 
ordered discontinued and all arrearanges are paid. 

Students, Professors and Alumni are invited 
to contribute literary articles, personals and items. 
Contributions must be accompanied by the writer's 
name. 

Address all communications to The Tiger. 
Colorado College, Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Entered at the Postoffice at Colorado Springs, 
Colo., as second-class matter. 



Patronize Tiger Advertisers 



EDITORIAL 



THB DBBATB. 



COME persons have feared that the fraternities 
would kill the literary societies, but the latter 
seem to be anything but dead at present. The en- 
thusiasm displayed last Friday night outdid even 
that of the Freshmen in the Declamation Contest. 
Partisanship has seemed at times to be almost 
enirely uncontrolled, but it is better so than that 
there should be no spirit at all. The men will 
work together against the common foe all the 
better for having won a glorious victory and 
acknowledged a fair defeat. A lesson we should 
learn from the debate is the necessity of prepara- 
tion for every contingency which may possibly 
arise. The victory of Apollo was due largely to 
the fact that they had foreseen every possible 
move of their opponents and were ready not only 
to parry, but to thrust. With the same hard 
work and the united backing of the whole col- 
lege our interstate debaters can do nothing but 
win the debate with Utah in the spring. 



A few of the older students will remember that 
the institution of the intersociety debate was due 
to the efforts of Professor Doudna, who did 
more for the cause of public speaking, and espe- 
cially debating, in days gone by than any other 
man. In the days when there was but one men's 
society in College he roused enthusiasm to such 
a pitch that the College, small as it was, chal- 
lenged the University of Nebraska to a series of 
debates in which we won more than our share 
of the honors. After the second society appeared 
on the scene, Mr. Doudna saw that even more 
good would come to the individual men, and to 
the societies from joint debates than from those 
with outside schools. 

It is to him, then, that our thanks are due for 
the annual event which does more to keep alive 
the literary societies than any other thing. May 
{he intersociety debate ever foster a keen spirit 
of rivalry in Apollo and Pearsons, which shall 
be he source of a larger College spirit. 



LBT HBR RIP. 



I F YOU have another engagement for the eve- 
-*• ning of January 20, let her rip. Every student 
in College and Academy used to attend the Glee 
Club Concert unless prevented by some causes be- 
yond their control, and these were few. Rip 
has as good music in it as is often heard in a 
concert, and is almost as funny as one of Pi's 
readings. In fact, you can't afford to miss it. 
Now listen — to each student selling $2.50 worth 
of tickets, or more, the management will give 
one tenth of his sales. This is an opportunity 
to get rich quick, as those who sold tickets for 
the show last year will tell you. See Shaw at 
once and get a bunch of tickets. Sell them to the 
people of the city rather than to the students; the 
latter will be there anyway. 



PAY UP. 



nr HOUGH you are allowed till February 15 on 
your pledge to the Athletic Association, that 
body would not object at all to 3^our paying in 
advance. Indeed, it needs the money badly this 
very day. It will be, no doubt, as easy to pay now 
as then, so do not delay. 



UBSCRIPTIONS are now due. Pay Hed- 
blom or Wasley. Do it now ! 



HOW SHOCKING! 

The naked hills lie wanton to the breeze. 
The fields are nude, the groves unfrocked ; 

Bare are the shivering limbs of shameless trees, 
What wonder is it that the corn is shocked ! 

— Bxchange. 



THE TIGER 




FOOTBALL CAPTAIN 1905. 

"Billy" Johnston, the doughty little quarterback 
of the Tigers, was elected last night to lead the 
eleven of 1905 in its struggles for the gridiron 
supremacy of Colorado. Though one of the light- 
est men on the team, "Billy" is one of the speedi- 
est, grittiest and best players. He uses his head- 
work to good advantage from his position at 
quarter, and handles his men like a general. He 
possesses the qualities of a leader, is popular with 
the men, and will undoubtedly make a good cap- 
tain for the wearers of the orange and black next 
fall. He plays his fourth and last year next sea- 
son. "Shorty" Randoph, the veteran quarter- 
back, was also supported by his friends for the 
position. 

The Carrie Nation Funnell Gang is the latest 
organization in Cutler. The first initiation of this 
order occurred at Manitou on Saturday night. 
After the performance of he mysterious rites of 
the order the following officers were duly in- 
stalled : 

Chief Destroyer, Moore. 

Dean, James. 

Carrier of the Great Funnell, Moses. 

Daily Distributor, Dickerman. 

This is a Chapter of one of the strongest or- 
ganizations in the west and in Cutler it is proving 
very popular, bidding fair to eclipse the record 
of some of the older student institutions. 

Bernard added to his fame as a pin-smasher 
on the Crescent alleys Friday night before Christ- 
mas, when he broke the state record for three 
straight games, rolling a total of 761, five pins 
above the former record held by Elliott, of Den- 
ver. Bernard also holds the alley record for a 
single game, having knocked down 279 pins. Just 
to give good measure, he made this score at two 
different times. Can he do it again? Well, we 
guess yes ! 



Last Monday night about a dozen of the Acade- 
my boys and girls, accompanied by a chaperone, 
made up a very jolly skating party at Broadmoor. 
After a delightful evening on the ice a little sup- 
per at the _ home of Miss Rice finished the eve- 
ning's enjoyment. 



Prof. Gile made a rather startling statement in 
class the other day concerning the gender of 
asses. The remark was the occasion for consid- 
erable laughter and some consternation. 

Basketball practice is on again and Captain 
Dickerman is particularly anxious to have a good 
crowd out to practice each time. 

Friday night before school began a small party 
of Academy people danced at the Kinnikinnick. 
An enjoyable evening was spent. 

Miss Masi, who won the girls' singles in the 
recent Round Robbin Tennis Tourney, is wear- 
ing a very pretty raquet pin as a trophy. 

Invitations are out for a special program at 
Hesperian, Friday, January the 13th. 

Miss Arnold has returned to school after an 
absence of several weeks. 

Hesperian attended, in a bociy, the Pearsons- 
Apollonian debate. 

Tuttle, Bennett and Bell are among those who 
have left school. 

The day of reckoning — January 16. 



Is your subscription paid? If not. now is the 
time they are due. 



"What is that beast upon the field?" 

Inquired the fussee mild. 
"Oh, that is the terrible old cross-buck. 

An animal fierce and wild." 

— Lanipy. 

Mighty athlete 

Marks below. 
Can't compete — 

An awful blow. 

What's the matter with the Apollonian de- 
baters ? 

Miss Elizabeth Taylor left Monday for Fort 
Collins. 



THE TIGER. 



A BIG BOOST. 



THE VESPER ADDRESS. 



The editor of the Outlook has evidently joined 
the Boosters' Club. An editorial in the Outlook 
of December 31, will speak for itself and for us. 

"The Outlook has had occasion at various times 
to comment on the need of Colorado College and 
the admirable work which it has done. 

"Its beautiful campus, within full view of the 
great range of which Pike's Peak is the crown, 
give it geographically a strategic point in one of 
the most important sections of the west, and it 
has been quick to seize its opportunity and make 
the most of it. 

"When Dr. Slocum accepted the presidency 
the College was a struggling academy heavily 
in debt; it now represents an investment in lands, 
buildings and endowments, of nearly one million 
and a half dollars; but, like many other colleges, 
its necessary expenditures are very much larger 
than its income, and it is compelled every year 
to face the alternative of a reduction in the scope 
and quality of its work or the heavy task of mak- 
ing up yearly a large deficit. It receives only 
a little over twenty thousand dollars annually 
from endowment funds and seventeen thousand 
dollars for tuition, while the exoenditures, over 
the cost of the engineering school, amount to 
fifty-five thousand dollars. The College is in 
sore need, therefore, of a material enlargement 
of its endowment, and the Board of Trustees, 
under the leadership of President Slocum, have 
made an appeal for the sum of five hundred 
thousand dollars in order to place the College 
in a sound position financially and to relieve its 
President of a work which is not only extremely 
exacting, but which absorbs a good deal of time 
and strength needed by the institution in other 
directions. 

"Colorado is one of the colleges of the rank of 
Bowdoin, Williams, and Amherst, and in a very 
short time it has developed a great deal of cul- 
tural quality which has always given the educa- 
tion of these institutions a certain distinction. 

"It has a right to appeal to the country on the 
ground of what it has accomplished with very 
limited means, of the high standard of its work, 
of its cultural element in its teaching, of its po- 
siton in a community unique in a certain sense 
in the New World by reason of its cosmopoitan 
character, and of the fact that its situation, at 
an elevation equal to that of Mount Washington, 
makes it a part of the general educational sys- 
tem of the country, for it is constantly receiving 
from eastern and southern colleges men who need 
the tonic of its pure air and who are able, because 
it exists, to complete an education which would 
otherwise be interrupted or arrested." 



Professor Sturgis spoke at the Y. W. C. A. 
vesper service Sunday afternoon. The title oT 
his sermon was "Life, and the Means of Main- 
taining Life." 

Both of these are necessary. The first without 
die second must end in a wrecked and wasted 
lite. Man has ever been searching after right- 
eousness. The earliest thinkers and philosophers 
searched for life through nature, but, necessarily 
tliey gave up in despair. Not till Christ carni- 
md walked upon the earth, did man find his 
p^rlect pattern for righteousness. 

Either Christ actually lived, or else four men, 
independent of each other, were able no C' n,:eive 
of a perfect life. 

There are but these two alternatives: Those 
who doubt Christ's earthly existence must 
acknowledge as great a miracle. Christ knew 
that within him was the life of God. His was 
a life of miracles, but it was righteousness that 
made Christ the greatest man that ever trod this 
earth. 

Unless we have found a better life, we must 
follow that one. There are, of course, obstacles 
in the way. It takes a venture of faith. But 
we can venture upon it, because millions before 
us have done likewise. Then the ideal is so high 
it is impossible of attainment. Is it worth \\hile? 
It means sacrifice and trials and struggle. But 
greater is the ideal, because it takes struggle, 
and because it cannot be attained. 

Since it is worth while we must take means 
to keep alive life. The spiritual life, as well as 
the physical life, must be nourished and strength- 
ened. First, by prayer, both private and public. 
The touch which comes from kindred spirits is 
essential. Church-going must be your habit and 
habit comes from rules. So make rules. Char- 
acter will be the result. 

The Holy Communion is another means of 
maintaining life. Whatever may be your regard 
and idea of it, remember Jesus Christ. 

Is it worth while then? 

If 3^ou care for your own happiness and that 
of humanity, it is worth while to struggle after an 
ideal that no one has ever attained, and to adopt 
the means of strengthening spiritual life. 



RIP VAN WINKLE. ' 

This year, as all doubtless know, the Glee 
Club was replaced by the Footlights Club, which 
made a tour very similar to a Glee Club tour, 
with the exception that the "First Night Hit" Rip 
Van Winkle was played, instead of giving the 
time-honored concert. This burlesque production 
is certainly a marvel. It is very surprising to see 
a clumsy boy transform himself into one of the 
daintiest girls in Colorado, or to see a great over ■ 



THE TIGER. 



grown fellow amuse the audience with the frolics 
and winning ways of the Buster Brown girl. 
There are funny situations from start to finish. 
No audience but went into convulsions when the 
learned schoolmaster fell four hundred feet to 
the bottom of a well, when Gretchen gets sar- 
castic, when the innkeeper misses the nail, when 
the Burgomaster finds the crowd, and in fact, 
whenever the curtain was up. The Glee Club 
feature has not been entirely abandoned, for the 
play is full of short, catchy choruses, of pretty 
solos and attractive specialties. This year, in 
order to have better facilities for presenting the 
opera, the show is to be given at the Opera 
House, Jan. 20. This means a great deal more 
expense, but the improvement in the show justi- 
fies the venture. That a Glee Club should do all 
that is possible for its College it must have the 
feeling that the student body is behind it and that 
every student in the College is personally inter- 
ested in the movement. This does not mean that 
the student body should buy tickets and then 
rest, feeling that it has done its duty, but it means 
that every person in Colorado College should boost 
the show. Tell everyone you meet that it's a 
dandy. It's a College affair and hence it's good. 
If we don't boost our own institutions we can rest 
assured no one else will. 



WHAT "SI" THINKS ABOUT ORATORY 
IN C. C. 

Everyone who was here last year knows "Si" 
Sylvester. Besides being a good fellow and lots 
of other things, "Si" was a prize-winner on the 
rostrum, and in view of the increasing attention 
being given to public speaking contests, it may 
be of interest to know what an "old grad", as 
he looks back over his college course, thinks 
about the value of these contests. 

"Sylvester, in a recent letter, says : 

"If there is one thing more than any other 
for which I constantly wish I were in College 
still, it is that I might have another chance at 
those oratorical contests. I got more real good 
out of the contests I entered than out of any 
other work I did. The effort itself is its own 
reward, and no activity in college life, according 
to my point of view, yields such dividends as does 
this. 

"The influence that the public speaker wields 
is enormous, and to be able to make another mind* 
think one's thoughts again is one of the best 
avenues to power. Most of the fellows don't 
find out the worth of the public speaking con- 
tests until too late. I didn't find out until senior 
year, and then I began to wish I had the whole 
four years over again and all the chances they 
would give. 

"I hope the students as a whole are getting 
v/aked up. Each individual, whether he is an 



orator or not, has some needful element latent 
within him which, should he give it voice, will 
help just that much to make for the best oratory 
in C. C. I want the dear old College to stand 
second to none this year and that result must be 
brought about by a good rivalry in the prelim- 
inary contest and by hard, serious work by the 
men who make the team. The College wants the 
type of man who wins to show himself this year. 
The best men in College must do their best work ; 
then, if necessary, we can suffer defeat with bet- 
ter grace, and vice versa, enjoy a victory with 
twice the heart." 



PHILO. 

In place of the usual literary and business meet- 
ing for Friday, Jan. 6th, the Philos had a musi- 
cal meeting at Ticknor Study. Miss Lennox, 
Miss Potter and Miss Gile were in charge of the 
meeting. The program was as follows : 

Piano Solo — ^"Rustle of Young" Linding 

Miss Manning. 

Mandolin Selection — Selected 

Miss A. Lennox, Miss Boynton. 

Vocal Solo — "The Ros-ary" Nevin 

Miss Jonston. 

Piano Solo — "Evening Star". . . .Wagner- Ambrose 

Miss Parsons. 

Reading — Selected 

Miss Beatty. 

Piano Solo— Prelude Rachmaninoff 

Miss Lennox. 

Vocal Solo — "A Many Years Ago" Woolcr 

Miss Collais 
Afterward tea and wafers were served. 
There has been no meeting this year that has 
been so much enjoyed by all the members as this 
one. .The Philos are greatly indebted to the Pro- 
gram Committee and to those who took part for 
arranging and carrying out siu:h a delightful pro- 
gram. 



STATE ORATORICAL ASSOCIATION. 



The Colorado State Oratorical Association held 
its annual business meeting in Denver on Thurs- 
day last. Representatives were there from Den- 
ver University, the Agricultural College and Col- 
orado College. M. C. Hall, who is secretary of 
the State Association, was our representative. 
Boulder sent no representative and submitted no 
list of judges as is directed by the constitution. 
The delegates of the Association voted that the 
University of Colorado be expelled from the As- 
sociation if she failed to submit a list of judges 
within a week. The date of the intercollegiate 
contest was se^ for February 24^h and the contest 
will be held in Perkins Hall. 

Our own preliminary conest will be held in 
Perkins Hall on Thursday, the 26th of this 
month. 



IC 



THE TIGHR: 



THE CONVENTION. 

The Fifth State Convention of the Young- 
Women's Christian Associations was held at the 
College from the 6th to the 8th of January. 

Delegates were present from the Colleges and 
Universities of Colorado and Wyoming. 

Friday afternoon the girls enjoyed a delightful 
talk by Miss Taylor on "Ideals and Problems 
of Student Societies." She told of the different 
student societies of Wellsley. Friday evening 
a very pleasant meeting was held in Ticknor 
study. Professor Gile delivered the address of 
welcome and Mrs. Baker, of Boulder, gave a most 
entertaining and helpful talk. 

Saturday- morning was given up to business. 

Saturday evening Dr. Work spoke in his usual 
convincing way, and Mrs. Lester McEean, a 
Colorado College alumna, told of the College Set- 
tlement work. ( 

On Sunday afternoon the Convention address 
was delivered by Mr. William C. Sturgis, of this 
city. A farewell service, led by Mrs. Slocum, 
was held Sunday evening. 

The girls will certainly look back on this Con- 
vention as one of the pleasantest and most help- 
ful events of the year. 



ALUMNI NOTES. 



Mrs. Eester McEean, nee Grace Smith, was 
a visitor at the College last week. 

Eulalie Reinhardt, 04, spent the holidays with 
her mother in Colorado Springs. 

Rufus Mead, '02, and Ruth Brush, ex-'o2, were 
attendants at the Kitely-Jonson wedding. 

Owing to the recent death of his father, Hugh 
McEean, '01, has left Harvard and returned to 
his home in Denver. 

Who said Jan. 20? Rip Van Winkle. 

Hypatia initiated eleven new members Thurs- 
day night. The study looked very cosy with a 
fire in the grate and sofa pillows placed inviting- 
ly around. After the initiation proper, refresh- 
ments were served. Informal dancing concluded 
the evening program. 

V/hat will I do after exams? No studying. I 
will be complekely lost. O, yes ! Rip Van 
Winkle. Something doing every minute. 

Misses Whitehurst, Simington and Pease en- 
tertained Messrs. Scibird, Mack and Vandemoer 
at a chafing-dish party Wednesday night. 



DAN CUPID & CO. 

Dealers in Matrimony. Satisfaction guaranteed. 
Mi. in office, Colorado College. References : 

MARRJEED. 

Grace Bradshaw, '01 — Arthur Holt, '98; Chi- 
cago, December 27. 

Kate Kitely, '02— Marshall Jonson, 03 ; Fort 
C\)llins, December 27. 

Carl Swisher, ex. '05 — Albert G. Cunningham; 
Cripple Creek, January 4. 

I, eta Cutler, '01— Dr. Chas. E. Eads ; Pueblo, 
December 27. 

Mazie Chaplin, ex. '06— Wilkie Collins ; Chey- 
enne, V/yo. 

Elsie Rowell, '95 — Francis Smith, Colorado 
Springs, December 28. 

Dora Slack, ex-'o6 — W. Dubois. Now at home 
in Cheyenne. 

ENGAGED. 

Pricilla Sater, '02 — Stephen Goodale, '99. 
Edith Albert, '02 — Wm. Warner, '02. 

? ? 



What did Sill drop at Fort Morgan? O, noth- 
ing ! 

Can Bale sit down? Ask Rip Van Winkle. , 

Bartlett saw a piece of Mistletoe. Oh, my ! 

Exams seem to loom up threateningly to the 
Freshmen. 

As one of the boys remarked, "It was a good 
thing to have the class pictures taken before 
the First of February." 

Latin B have found a motto for photographers : 
"Peine siipercilio nuhem." 

Miss Burns spent Xmas in Grand Junction. 

The vesper service was well attended an.d very 
helpful. 



TIGER WANT ADS. 



Now, what have I on for Friday, Jan. 20? O, 
yes ! Rip Van Winkle. I cant miss that. 

The Y. W. C. A. girls rejoiced to see Miss 
Elizabeth Taylor, ex-'04, one of the visitors at 
the convention last week. 



"If you don't see what you want, ask for it." 
Remember to use the Tiger Want Columns. Rates 
one cent a line a week. Special rates to students. 
WANTED — $500,000 for my endowment fund. 
' Any person wishing to contribute to same ad- 
dress W. F. S. 



THE TIGER 



IT 



GIRL WANTED (for Friday night only)— Must 
be able to talk enough for two; not particular 

as to age or looks. Good wages. Pearsons Stag. 

LOST, STRAYED OR STOLED— One inter- 
society debate. Finder please return to P. L. S. 

FOR SALE— One cartilage stretcher. It has 
lengthened me, it will lengthen you. Jno. D., Jr. 

FOUND — One joke, much the worse for wear; 
branded with initials R. B. S. Owner may 

have same by calling at the office and paying for 

this ad. 

WANTED— You to know that the treasurer of 
of the Athletic Association is ready for the 

money you pledged. 

LOST — My temper on finding that an over-night 
book has been taken out of the Library and 

kept for several days. English Student. 

FOR SALE — By almost anyone, tickets to Rip 
Van Winkle at Opera House, Jan. 20. Satis- 
faction guaranteed. 

WANTED— Wheel racks in front of Palmer Hall, 
that the grass may be given a chance, and the 

steps may not be blocked. 

HELP WANTED— The Local Editor will be m 
a state of collapse if his correspondents do not 

correspond more. O.f course, this does not mean 

you. 

FOR RENT — There are still a few alcoves unoc- 
cupied. No children allowed. 



Professor E. C. Hills and Professor J. C. 
Shedd, of Colorado College, were elected members 
of the Educational. Council of the Colorado Teach- 
ers' Association. 



We are glad to see Prof. Cajori back. 

Rumor — Pearsons Club House will be opened 
Friday evening. 

Plans are already being made by the girls for 
a grand celebration after exams are over. 

■ On Tuesday some of the classes enjoyed the 
novelty of new recitation rooms. 



How pleasant everyone looks ! The photog- 
rapher made a mistake and used the smile and 
won't come off. 

Remember the Minerva candy sale, January 21, 
at 108 North Tejon. 



Societies and Associations 

APOLLONIAN CLUB. 

Oration Fawcett 

Music Quartet 

Parliamentary Drill 

Extempore Speeches 



CONTEMPORARY CLUB. 

Friday, January 13, the society will meet at 
the home of Prof. Gile, who will speak on "Japan's 
Position in the World Today". 



MINERVA. 



Jan. 13, 05 — Henry IV. and V. The Develop- 
ment of Shakespeare's Ideal Hero — Miss Lock- 
hart. Falstaff, a Travesty of Chivalry — Miss 
McMillan. Music. 



ACADEMY NOTES 

Mr. Noyes has taken charge of Academy Eng- 
lish. We are very sorry that Miss Brown will 
no longer be with us. 

Wm. F. Herron, known in Cutler by the fa- 
miliar name, "The Deacon," is this year a stu- 
dent at Leland Stanford, Jr. University. We copy 
below a short poem from ' his pen. The verses 
appeared in the Christmas number of "The Se- 
quoia/' the Stanford monthly magazine : 



EXCHANGES. 



The Librarian is giving special lessons to his 
assistants. 



The University of Iowa is to have a $50,000 
engineering building. 



Skating is good on Prospect Lake. 

Mr. J. W. McCreery visited his son and 
daughters this week. 

When Hall spoke in his debate of "padded fig- 
ures" he was thinking of the famous girls' sex- 
tette in Rip an Winkle. 



At Pennsylvania University, there are only 
two fraternities that have not started classes for 
bible study. 

Ice parties for the Varsity and the freshman 
hockey teams of Columbia have been started 
at St. Nicholas Rink. Elementary team work is 
practised. 



"Did you blow yourself at home during va- 
cation?" 

"No, only my nose." 



The Indiana association of Master Bakers 
i,- urging introduction into Purdue University 
of a course of scientific baking. 



THE TIGER 



The University of Iowa is to have a statistical 
laboratory. Chicago and Columbia are the only 
other colleges in the United States having such 
a laboratory. 

The girls at Wells College on Hallowe'en had 
an enthusiastic political rally. The girls played 
the parts of political leaders of national prorni- 
nence, and made fine speeches on current ques- 
tions. 



The Cornell Sun editorially protests at the 
injustice done to students by magnifying their 
transactions of law. One man at Cornell was re- 
cently fined $30 for throwing a penny on the 
stage of the Lyceum Theatre. 



Students, if in need of glasses or repairs on 
same, see Ashby, the Optical Jeweler, the oldest 
established in the county. You will find every- 
thing right. 



College Pillow Tops foi* 

ASHFOKD m, ROBERTS 

_/tri and ,yiationery Co. 

126 N. Tejoiv 

15 per cent discount to students on fra.ming 



When in doubt, take the safe side. 
Send bundles to the 

eolorado Springs Laundry 



Est. 20 yrs. 



Ralph Rice, College Agt. 



Bookkeeping 

Shorthand 

Typewriting 



^, 



CENTRAL 



usiness 



College 



College Estab- 
lished in 
Denver in 1887 



L. A. ARNOLD, Pres. J. C. CROY, Prin. 

Nichols Block, 18 and 20 S. Tejon St., 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Rooms inviting, Work Thorough, Teachers up-to-date 

Call or Write for Information. 



C. W. WARSOP & CO.. 



205 N. Tejon St. 



Draperies, Upholstery Goods, Furniture. Complete line of Screens, 
Pillows, Pillow Tops, Couch Covers, etc. 



The 50-mile-an-hour Wheel 


THE CRESCENT 


Reading Standard Bicycles 

^^fthli & KlUU^ Opposite Plaza Hotel 


BOWLING ALLEYS 

115-117 North Cascade Ave. 




Prof. Chas. J. Hausdorf, 

TEACHER OF MANDOLIN, GlITAR AND BANJO. 

Music furnished for weddings, receptions, enter- 
tainments, etc. 

21 North Lejon. 


Telephone IVlain 863 
E. S. SOLLENBERGER, Mgr. 

Private Alleys for Ladies 
Eight Alleys on one Floor 
Special Rates to Parties and Clubs 


FRANK F. CRIMP 

FLORIST 

Phone 500 509 E. Columbia St. 

Special attention given to Telephone Orders. 


H. E. BOATRIGHT 

^ubltc Steno£^rapher 

33 GIDDINGS BLDG. 
Rates oc per 100 words, 50c per hr. extra carbons 5c per page 



THE TIGER 



13 



WHEN IN NEED OE CLOTHING, HATS 
OR ELRNISHINGS 

We would suggest that you consult your 

professor as to the best place to go. 

We are willing to abide by their 

judgement as they all trade 

with us. We give spe- 

ial discount to students 

The B. W. DAVIS CLOTHING & FUR- 
NISHING CO., 102 N. Tejon St. 



The Williafflson=Haffner 
Engraving Company 



'fsa 



1633 Arapahoe Street 



DENVER 



0r. 7l/. bowler, 

DENTIST 



IS South JJejon St, 



G. W. Pauly, B. S., D. O. Mrs. Lona E. Pauly, B. S. D. O. 

Graduates of A. T. Still's College of Osteopathy, 

Kirksville, Mo. 

DR. & MRS. PAULY, '^Wf^I^i'= 

Office, rooms 303-304 DeGraff Bldg. 118 N. Tejon St., Colo- 
rado Springs, Colo. Phones— Office Ked 1272; Res. Red 323 
Hours 8 to 12 a. m., 1 to 5 p. m. 



F* H* Weelcs 

26 East Bijou St. 

Photographs taken any hour 
of the day or evening by 
flashlight. Especially suit- 
able for groups. Call and see 
samples. 

Special Rates to Stivdents 



next 



You are next to a good hair cut or shave when you patronize 



The Manhattan Barber Shop, J. R. WEYIMAR, Prop, so e. bijou 



10 per ct. Discount 



Oo All Boots and Shoes 
To College Students — 

(Ladies' Queen Quality exceptedj 

WHITAKER & GARDNER 

30 N. TEJON ST. 



THE STAR is the leader for prompt 
and satisfactory service. 

SPECIAL RATES to students of col- 
lege and academy 

S. E. BENNETT, College Ag't. 



CHARLES P. BENNETT 

Real Estate, Loans 


w. I. Lceas 

Columbia, Hartford, Rambler, Ideal & Tribune Bicycles 

The only first-class re i air shop in town. Chainless wheels 
a specialty. Wheels for rent. Phone 517-A 1 29 N. Tejon 


and Insurance*^ ^ 

NO. 5 PIKE'S PEAK AVENUE 


Students wishing a Special Course in Drawing, 
Water Colors, Oil or China Painting'^ should call 
at Art Studio, io8 N. Tejon MARIE R. FORBISH, 
Member of Art Institute, Chicago. 



Hart, SchafFner & Marx Clothing. 

"Paragon" Trousers. «^^^^ Hawes & Guyer Hats. 



14 



THE TIGER 











Colorado Coflege 




THE OLDEST INSTITUTION FOR 






HIGHER EDUCATION IN THE WEST 




FOUNDED AT COLORADO 




SPRINGS IN 1874 


• 




Colorado College now offers advantages of the same 






grade as the best institutions. 






For information concerning Courses of Study, Rooms 






and Board, Physical Culture, etc., apply to 






WM. F. SLOCUM, President, 






or EDWARD S. PARSONS, Dean. 






For information in regard to the College Department of 






Music, inquire of 






EDWARD S. PARSONS, Dean. 






Those wishing information as to the Courses in Drawing, 






Painting, Designing, etc., etc., inquire of 






EDWARD S. PARSONS, Dean. 






For information concerning the Engineering Depart- 






ment, apply to 






FLORIAN CAJORI, 






Dean of Engineering School. 






Cutler Academy 




Cutler Academy is the Associated Prepartory School of 




Colorado College, in which students are prepared for any 






American College. Address, 






M. C. GILE, Principal. 


■• 




- 



THE TIGER. 



15 



The Albert Sechrist Manufacturing Co. 

WILL INSTALL GAS and 



1033 16th 
Street 




ELECTRIC FIXTURES 

in your residence at Colorado Springs 
same price as Denver, without extra 
charg-e. Call and select your fixtures, 
or will send you a catalogue. 



DENVtR, 
COLO. 





"THE LINE THAT SUITS THEM ALL." 

IVOW, JUST REMEMBIi;R 

That the shortest, best and quickest line between Cripple Creek, Leadville, 
Aspen, Salt Lake and the West is Via 

The Colorado Midland Railway 

'It's the Midland Route that's Popular 

R. T. DUN AW AY, C. P. A.,. Colorado Springs. 
C. H. SPEERS, H. C. BUSH, 

Gen. Pass. Agent. Traffic Manager. 

810 17th Street, Denver. 



Our Microscopes, Microtomes, Laboratory Glass- 
ware, Chemical Apparatus, Chemicals, Photo 
Lenses and Shutters, Field Glasses, Projection 
Apparatus, Photo-Micro Cameras are used by{ 
the leading Lab- ^^^^^^ oratories and 
Gover'nt Dep'ts^^lHj^ Round the World 



SCOPES 



Free 



Bausch & Lomb Opt. Co. 

^ Rochester, N. Y. 

New York Chicago Boston Frankfurt, Oy 



ST. JOHN & BARNES 

Oldest and largest plumbing and heating 

tstabllshment in city. Your 

patronage solicited 



Telephone 13 



206 N. Tejon St 



Coal $2.00 per ton. 
Tvidor CoaLl Co., 

Cdt. Cascade a^nd Cucharras. 676"b 



^ "WcLgoTi Load of ^ ^ 

New Wood Type 

And OtHei* Ma^teria^ls 

Of the -Very Latest at your T>Uposal_for 

Wirvdow Cacrds 
Tickets, Flyers etc 

B /f G 'RA V I JV G — C he rin est 

The Telegraph Job Rooms 119 e. p. p. Ave. 

Ask wKer© TK© Tiger is Printed 



The ©Id 

Curio Store 

Wholesale and Retail 
Dealers in 

GENUINE INDIAN GOODS AND 
CURIOSITIES 

J. S. CANDELARIO, Prop., 

301 and 303 San Francisco Street, 

SANTA FE, N. M. 



Colorado School of Scientific Physical Culture. 

THOS. R. DALY. 410 Mining Exchange Building. PHONE RED 1821. 



i6 



THE TIGBR. 



El Paso Cleaning & Tailoring Co. 

10 E. Kiowa St. Phone Main 667=A Colo. Springs 



Pressing Dyeing Altering 

Cleaning Repairing Tailoring 



ElectroJhermatoriumBatliParlors 

124 South Tejon Street 

Hot Air, Electric and Turkish Baths, plectric 

Light, Salt Glow and Packs. 

COLLINS & CO., Props. 



Office Phone 509-B 



Residence Phone Red 87 



DR. BARRY L. MOREHOUSE 



DENTIST 



Hours 9-12, h30-5 



First Nat'l Bank Bldfl., room 8 



C. F. Arcularius & Co. 
Jewelers 

Diamonds and Watches 

Fine Jewelry Manufacturing 

9 South Tejon St. Colorado Springs 

The 

Cfissey & Fowler Lumber 



Company 



Phone 101 



117 to 123 West Vermijo Ave. 



Phone 540 

Monarch Hand 
Laundry 

421 S. Tejon 

KARL L. MOHLER, Prop. 
W. J. WALLRICH, College Agt. 

WE LaCNOER aNYTHING 

FINE CHOCOLATE BON BONS 



Name on every Piece 

Ice Cream, Hot and Cold 

Sodas 

Tresh Candies madeexery hour 



IMON ICE AND COAL COMPANY 

W. M. BANNING, Prop. 




Coal, mood atid Tee 

Dealers in all kinds of Coal and Artificial and 
Natural Ice 

Yard Office, 105 W. Vermijo Ave. City Office, 5 N. Tejon 




JOHN MOFFAT 

Tine Cailoring 

Repairing, Cleaning, Pressing. Special rates to 
College Students 

Over Waiting's Book Store 16 South Tejon St. 



Carriages, Cabs, 

'Busses, Baggage and 

Transfer Wagons 

Office, 15 North eascade 



Denver Law School 

Law Department of the 
University of Denver 

Three years' course leading to the degree of 
Bachelor of Laws. Courses in Mining and Irri- 
gation Law. Full resident faculty. For informa- 
tion address 

LICIUS W. HOYT, Dean 

Ernest & Cranmer BIdg., Denver, Colo. 

Old You Know 

That our stock of package crackers is so 
great in its variety that you could have a 
change for every day for more than two 
months and yet not exhaust our list? Well, 
it's a fact. We have a kind for every pos- 
sible time and occasion — and they are all 
good. Finest bakery goods in the city. 
Fancy Groceries 

W. N. BURGESS, 112 N. Tejon St. 

Titsworth & Davidson 
DAIRY 

2 MILES S. E. or COLORADO SPRINGS. P. 0. BOX 6 

The Houck-Davidson Coal and Transfer Co. 

Dealers In 

CANON CITY, MAITLAND 

AND LIGNITE COAL 

Phone 473-B. Office 118 N. Tejon. P. O. Box 257 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 



i 



tSi 



ee 






"She Gowdy-Simmons Printing Company 

FOR WINDOW CARDS, TICKETS, ETC. ENGRAVED 
CARDS AND INVITATIONS ON SHORT NOTICE 



♦ ♦♦4*<l'4>4>«i*4'4>4*4*«»4**l*4>^4>4>4*4>4>4>*i*4>4*4*4'4*«i>4i4'4>«4*4>4'««»4>«»4>4'4>4i4* 

* ^ ^ ♦ 

2/ Tforih ♦ 
TJeJon St, 4i 

4* 
4» 
♦ 
4* 



Established 1897 

SMITH, 



^ Phone Main 151 

* P* w 

1 FAMILY GROCER, TEA AND 

J COFFEE MERCHANT . : : : : 

. Orders Called for and Promptly Delivered 



717 N. Weber St. Colorado Springs, Colo. 



THE DERN TEA AND COFFEE CO 

Dealers in TEAS, COFFEES, SPICES, 
EXTRACTS, BAKING POWDERS, Etc. 



Phone 575 



29 S. Tejon St. ^ 



The PeopIe^s Qtoczty and Market 



PHONE MAIN 868 



222 EAST PIKE'S PEAK 



♦ S JAMES & SON, Props. 

♦ 



Colorado Springs, Colorado * 



fii^' 



iPhotoffraphs 



at 6INGHHM & WOOD'S, 18 S. Teion % 



GREENHOUSES: Cor. Platte and Wasatch. 

J. B. Braidwood, 



SUCCESSOB 



^ WILLIAM CLARK, 



Florist. 



Established 1873. 

PHONE 



Caivon City CodLl 




Gets tKe Meals 

on time every 

Time 

We are sole 
Agents 



The Coloirado Springs 




cAsk your dealer for 

VICTOR 

Athletic 
Supplies 

HELP THE TIGER 

by buying 

Scott Bicycle Titcs 

Write tis if yea cannot get them of 
year dealer. 

THE SCOTT SUPPLY & TOOL CO. 

DENVER, COLO. 



4* 

4> 
•I* 

4* 

* 
4* 

* 
4* 
4* 

4* 
♦ 
4^ 



4- 



* USE ELECTRIC LIGHT 

♦ IN YOUR HOMES 

4» 



f The Colorado Springs Electric Co. 



4»4»4*4i4*4i4*4»4i4»4»«4*4i4*4'4*4*4*4»4>4*4»4i4>4*4'4*4>4*4>4*4»4*4*4*4i4i4*4*4i4*4»4*4*4 



4* 4* ♦ 4* ♦ ♦ ♦ •!> ♦ ii» 4i 4> 4* 4> ♦ «» '!•♦ Hh ♦ ♦ 4* 4* ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ 4> ♦♦ 4> ^li^ 4* ♦ 

4. The IToxjktig Nen^s Store* 



4* 4* 4i 4* 4* « 4* 4> 4* ♦ 



We Have a $}0.00 Suit Sale On. 



It is a good thing right after Xmas, when a fellow has spent about all he has. 
We are offering between 150 and 200 Suits worth from $13.50 to $20.00, at $10.00. 



of Suits are several Blues and Blacks. 



In this ^ 



* SPECIAL DISCOUNT 
i TO ALL STUDENTS 



HOLBROOK & PERKINS ; 



THE DENVER FIRE CLAY CO. 

MANUFACTUREIS OF 
AND DEAURS IN 



I Chemical and Physicial Apparatus and Chemicals 



♦ 

4> 
4* 
4* 

♦ 1742-1746 Champa Street, 

4- >_ 

4* 
4* 



A FULL LINE OF UBORATORY SUPPLIES AND ASSAY GOODS 
Write for Illustrated tetelogues 



♦ 
4> 

4> 

DENVER, COLORADO ♦ 

4» 

♦ 
4> 

4» 
♦ 
4* 



A. R WHAITE & COMPANY, 



J Men's and Boys' Outfitters. 

* J 8 and 20 South Tcjon Street. 



* H. C COLBURN, Pr«s. ^ E. A. COLBURN, Jr., Sec'y and Tfeas, * 

♦ T/?e ^yl fitters ^^titotnobile Co. ♦ 

♦ LIVERY, STORAGE. REPAIRING * 

^ Telephone Main 122 S-tO Jf. Jie^Xida A-Oe. Colorado Spring*. Colo, ^ 



* 
***** 




O. E. HEMENWAY 



Groceries and Meats 



n 5 South Tejon St 
Colorado Springs, Colorado 




4>4'4*4'4»4*4>4»4>4*4'4>4>4'4i4'4'4>4'4*4>4>4'4>4>4>4'«4>4'«4'«4i4'4i 



4» 

♦ 
4* 

♦ 
4> 

4* 4* 4* 



IM TIGBR 



Colorado College 



\ 




/ 



JANVAR.Y 19tK, 1905 

VOLl/MB VII. JVumber 16. 



4* 

4 



♦ ♦♦♦^♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦^ 44* 4444 4 

Special Fates to Students 

On Rented Pianos 




The KNIGHT -eaMPBELL 
Music eompany 



New Lennox Block 



Opposite North Park 



St. John Bros.r"'"'™"' 

Gas and Steam Fitters 

Hot Water Heating a Specialty 

Prompt attention given to Repair Work. 

gurtis goal Go. 

Office 132 N. Tejon St. Telephone 91. 

Try '*NE',V RANGE" for the Kitchen, $4.00. 
BiTUMNOUS Coal at Standard Prices. 



SELDOMRIDGE BROTHERS, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

Flout, Feed, Grain, Hay and Seeds 

108 South Tejon Street 



Repairing while You Wait Satisfaction Guaranteed 

A complete plant of New Machinery for 
the Manufacture of Fine Boots and Shoes 

The Lightning Shoe Shop 

BROWN "k c; O M P A N Y 
We make a specialty of Shoes to Measure and Shoes for 
Cripples. 28^ North Tejon St. Colorado Springs 

Visiting Cards in latest Styles, 

WE SHOW 3y advertising in THE TiGER that we 
1OII........M. appreciate your custom. 

23 E. Kiowa St. The Pfompt Printer J 



NEW : EMPIRE : THEATRE 

lOc VAUDLVILLE lOc 

3-SHOWS DAiLY-3 
I Matinee, 3 p. fn. Evenings, 7:30 Und 8:45. 



♦ ♦♦4*4><l*4»<i>4*4>4*«4>4'«4>4>«4'4>«l*4*t 

Elegant \ 

1 IlUlUd Lighting and Finish ♦ 



Discount to Students 




71UM 4 



Phone 6;^-a 
Corner Cascade and Kiowa 



COLLEGE GOWNS, CAPS 

The Best Workmanship 
at Lowest Prices 

Silk Faculty Gowns and Hoods 



COX SONS & VININe 

262 Fourth Avenue., NEW YORK 




SKATES 

Hockey Sticks 

^slSWEATERS 

Basket Ball and 
Y. M. e. H. Suits 

at Strangs 

119 North Tejon Street 

Mueth's 

Soda, Ice <3reaiii 

eHTERING 

CHAS. T. FERTIG 

^al Estate, Loans and Insurance 

29 N, Tejon Street 

S^» Colorado Spr/n^s ^i'ortgi C^,, 

FLORISTS 



y^-^ T^^ftA "Um/OM Sfrwmf 



♦ 

4* 

' 4 

4» 

4* 

♦ 

4* 
4» 

♦ 
4* 
4> 

* 
4> 
4- 
4* 
4* 
4> 
♦ 
♦ 
4* 
♦ 
4* 
♦ 
4* 

♦ 
4> 

4* 

4* 

4* 

4> 

♦ 



Phone 556-8 



DOVGLrAS ea HCTHGRINGTON 

^rchitect^ 

Rooms 15-16 Outwest Building, Colorado Springs, Colo. 



«4i«4*«4*44>444>4>4'4>4*4<»4 4*4*«4*4>4>444*4>4>4»4*44>4»«4>4>4>4>4»4>«4>4 



*t 



THE TIGER 



Student's Book Store 



and Watch Fobs, 
and up. 



Books, Stationery; all Engi- 
neer's Supplies; College Pins 
Century Fountain Pens $1 to $4, Waterman's $2.50 

REYER & PLATT. 



For $1 00 D6r month ' ^"'^ Sponged and Pressed each week 
— ^ PANTATORIIM. 



17 East Bijou, Branch Office opp. Plaza Hotel, 



THE COLORADO SPRINGS CO. 

The Original Locators of 

Colorado Springs and 9/fanitou 

is still offering for sale choice 
lots on North Weber Street 
and North Wahsatch Avenue 

Also lots for sale In other parts of Colorado Springs 
and in Manitou 

Apply at ROOM 8, OUTWEST BUILDING 

LOUIS STOeK 

Office and Works, 13 E. Kiowa St. 

TELEPHONE 452-A 

Cleaning, Dyeiug, Scouring in all its branches 

Ostrich Plumes Cleaned, Dyed and Curled 

Kid Gloves Dyed and Cleaned. 



GIDDINGS BROS. 

FINE DRESS Goods and Ladies' 
TAILOR Suits, Ladies' 

FURNISHINGS 



Kiowa and Tejon Streets. 



Wc do Everything in the Tailoring 
Line 

y B. CORRIN 

103 E. Bijou St. COLORADO SPRINGS, COLO. 

D, E. MONROE & CO. 
Prescription Dru^dist 

The best of Drugs, Stationery and Toilet Articles 

NO LIQUORS SOLD. 
eor. Teioti S( Biiou Pbone 311 Sf 331 

THE HEFLEY-ARCILARIUS DRUG CO. 
Druggists 

Kodaks, Cameras and all kinds of Photographic 
Supplies. Developing and Printing for Amatuers. 
Free Delivery. 
PKone 144 21 South Tejon Street 



liardware Bicycles 

fl. S. BLHKE 

NewChainless Bicycle $35 and $20 

Rambler, Orient and National Automobiles 

Best Hepair Shop in city 107 n. Cejon 

nirs. Y)^ K« brooks 

Coilct Parlors at 20 East Kiowa 

Also Room 52, Antlers Hotel 

No Apprentices. Only experienced help employed. 

A COVIPLETE ENCYCLOPEDIA OE AMATEIR SPORT 

SPALDINGS OFFICIAL ATHLETIC ALMANAC 

for 1905. Edited by J. E. Sullivan. 

(Chief of Department of Physical Culture, Louisiana 
Purchase Exfosition.) 
Should be read by every student, as it contains the re- 
cords of athletes and all amateur events in this country 
and abroad. It also contains a complete review of the 
Olympic Games from the official report of Director Sul- 
livan and a resume of the two days devoted to sports in 
which savages were the only contestants, in which it is 
proved conclusively that savages are not the born ath- 
letes we have heretofore supposed them to be. This is 
the first time in which the athletic performance of s v- 
ages have ever been systematically recorded. 

This is the largest Athletic Almanac ever published, 
containing .320 pages. Numerous illustrations of promi- 
nent athletics and track teams. 

PRICe, lO CEINTS 
For sale by all newsdealers and 
A. G. SPALDIIVQ <& BROS. 
New York, Chicago, St. Louis, Philadelphia, San Fran- 
cisco, Kansas City, Buffalo. Denver, Washington, Boston, 
Baltimore, Pittsburg, Minneapolis, New Orleans, Cin- 
cinnati, Syracuse, Montreal, Can., London, Eng. 
Send for a copy of Spalding's Athletic Goods 
Catalogue. It's free. 

HENRY TAMM 

Druggist 

PRESCRIPTIONS 
TOILET ARTICLES 
STATIONERY 

All Popular Drinks Served 
at our Soda Fountain 

Plaza Hotel, Cor. Cache la Poudre & Tejon Sts. 

THE RlIGBY=PRmROSE COAL CO. 



All Kinds of Fuel 



Phone 481-A 



West 44-A 



21 N. TEJON ST. 



H.KRAIVZ 



P. R. SMITH 



POReELAIX BaTH TUBS 

H. KRRNZ & e©., Barbers 

Only 8 Chair Barber Shop in the City Try the I lectric Vibrassage Machine 

lOen B. Pike's Peak ave. COLORaDO SPRINGS. e©LO. 



THE TIGER 



DR.. SCHADT 

SPECIALTY PRACTICE 

The Scientific Examination of your eyes and fitting of 
glasses. Special Discount to students. Consultation free. 
Office— 303 Colorado Bldg., corner Tejon and Huerfano Sts. 

Zehner Jewelry Co»^ 

26 Pikers Peak Avenue. 

CTI iriFIMT^--- We have a fine assortment of gfoods 
a I ULFLI^ I O on j^and. CALL AND SjEE THEM 



We sell a GOOD FOUNTAIN PEN for $i 

WHITNEY & GRIMWOOD 

Opera House Building 

We are agents for WATERMAN'S IDEAL FOUNTAIN 
Pens. Prices from $2. 50 up. 



Watchmaker and Jeweler 

15 South Kjey'on Si, 




lOOOWORlH 



cr>< 



A- 



loRracOL'-^'^ 



1739 Champa St., DENVER, COLO. 



THE COLORADO R0AD7 







Come in and a^K. questions 



"Frenzied Finance" does not include invest- 
ments in Colorado & Southern Railway tickets, 
but on the other hand you are certain of good 
returns, which are bound to please and satisfy 
you. 



Avoid the last moment's worry, caused by pur- 
chasing" tickets at Depot, by coming- in at the New 
city office, No. 119 E. Pike's Peak, and let us fix 
you out the day before. Money back if ticket is 
not used. Remember that. 

J. H. Springer, 
Commercial Agent. 



PHOTOGRAPHS at Popalar Prices 

at MERRICK'S, 30 SOUTH TEJON ST. 

If you want to give pictures to college friends it will not be so expensive if you have your work done here. 

FRANK H. SMALL watches, Diamonds, fine Watch Work. Special 
Jeweler and Silversmith P"ce to Students. 113 Pike's Peak Ave. 



nhe TIGCR 



Vol. VII. 



COLORADO COLLEGE, JANUARY 19. 1905. 



No. 16 



SESAME AND LILIES 



If you have read "King's Treasuries," you ought 
to know how to read, what to read, and should 
have some good thoughts on why to read. First, 
the author tells us we are not reading the great 
unless we also feel them ; that we do not feel them 
unless we are like them. But still, in order to 
rtad thus understandingly, we must comprehend 
the English language — better by knowing some- 
thing of others. In answer to the second he tells 
us, (the eminent dead ; because it gives us the op- 
portunity of cultivating the friendship of true 
kings. Especially should books of great writers 
be read for the sake of time ; if you read this you 
cannot read that. 

In this essay he makes a strong plea for all he 
thinks good. Embraced under this is "sensation," 
of which he takes a peculiar view, saying, "the es- 
sence of all vulgarity lies in the want of sensa- 
tion ;" places it among the most desirable attributes 
of womanhood — "which the pure woman has above 
all creatures — firmness and fulness of sensation, 
byond reason, the guide and sanctifier of reason 
itself." 

Things pertcfining to Queen's Garlands, are ex- 
quisitely pure, lofty and ideal, when reviewed 
with Ruskin. The treatise on the education of 
woman, the relationship between woman and wife 
and the home, and the duty of the world to girl- 
hood is beautiful throughout. To Ruskin a girl 
is a flower, to be nourished for the sake of her 
beauty. Then as she gains in strength, as well, as 
to "temper her mind with thoughts which tend 
to confirm her natural instincts of justice and 
refine her natural tact of love." Afterward, should 
come the woman of the type of his own dear 
mother "to secure the order, comfort, and love- 
liness of the home," and the functions expanded 
to do likewise for the nation. But these girls, 
these "feeble florets" with all their fresh leaves 
torn and their stems broken, will you never go 
down to them nor set them in order?" 

Ruskin's keeness and perception point out many 
truths, but suggest many riddles. In fact, he 
seems to dwell on the difficult or impossible in 
religious, social and political economy, but only 
to set out the possible and plausible. The evidence 
of a directing Providence to him means the neces- 
sity of co-operating rather than hindering. From 
speculations on various abstractions and questions 
of heavenly magnitude he comes out to reveal its 
uselessness, these having been without result even 
for Milton and Dante. 



He philosophizes variously on all these, ad- 
vocating with entirety of heart the carrying out of 
Vv-hat seems right. There is a prevailing optimism 
as shown by such references as "not that any feel- 
ing possible to humanity is in itself wrong, but 
only wrong whenever disciplined," indicating a 
spirit of transcendentalism and idealistic beliefs, 
throwing in dark contrast the incredible nonsense 
about total depravity and downward tendencies. 

Though optimistic in this way, along with Car- 
lyle, Ruskin sees the life of the English people 
through no flattering glass and seizes the oppor- 
tunity in these lectures to severely censure the 
British public. In speaking of reading he remarks, 
"It is simply and sternly impossible for the Eng- 
lish public at this moment to understand any 
thoughtful writing— so incapable of thought has it 
become in its insanity and avarice." Again he 
accuses, "W^e have despised literature, science, and 
nature and compassion." 

Severe as he is, his lectures just fill the need of 
the age. They have brought about a needed stir- 
ring up. While there are pages in "Sesame and 
Lilies" which instruct by reproducing the wisdom 
of an active lifestudy, or interest by their earnest- 
ness and sincerity, or are pleasing to our ear and 
artistic sense on account of their rh3'thm, natural 
ease and beauty of phraseology, other portions, 
seemingly inspire delight, charm and elevate be- 
yond the extent of all the preceding practical, 
though always exalted discourse. There is some- 
thing here which impels us, having entered, to go 
on and on in the effort to approach more nearly 
the source of this power; and as no one would 
stop halfway in a very sacred place to gaze curi- 
ously about, so you would not think of lingering 
to discover how these words of force and beauty 
are linked together. 

How difficult it always is for a person to bring 
himself to speak of a wonderful musical repro- 
duction if it has just convinced him in part, of 
his own nobleness. It is like saying injury of 
something which you somehow feel has done you 
nothing but good. Better to say merely, it is good. 
In attempting to describe it you realize that you 
are lowering into your own level, thus losing the 
inspirations of ideality. For, to bring advance- 
ment to ourselves, we ought to love God or prin- 
ciple instead of human beings. We must set the 
stars far out if we expect to reach the mountain 
top. 



THB TIGBR 



This instructive feeling makes it a hard task 
to pierce certain lines of poetry, certain flights 
of oratory, or simply to admit to anyone other 
than delicately and indefinitely to ourself our ad- 
miration for that which had drawn us out of our 
boasted self-containment and reserve. And so 
one feels in regard to certain eloquent passages 
of "Sesame and Lilies," wherein are particularly 
exhibited those things which demand our sincer- 
est though silent adulation ; the art which Ruskin 
says is art because it cannot be talked about. He 
himself has often attained such perfection. — 
The Kaimin. 



THE ETHICAL ADDRESS. 

What shall we do with the rest of the year? 
How are we going to be able to keep going? 
First, we must have the largest conception of life. 
Don't let yourselves be mastered by a little nar- 
row view of things. Have a contempt for little- 
mindedness. When disheartened or tempted to 
give up, keep your conception of life before you, 
and don't allow yourself to become discouraged. 
A great commanding purpose and aim in life will 
overcome all morbidness. 

In the second place you must make your life 
definite. This does not necessarily mean that you 
must choose your definite profession or business 
for the future. But you must have a definite 
moral purpose in all your work. Having begun 
a thing, don't give it up till you have carried it 
on to its fulfillment. Next, you must' be persistent. 
Life's highway is strewn with the wrecks of those 
who give up. The world needs your best selves. 
Your failures only burden others. What you 
cannot bear someone else must bear for you. So 
don't let mistakes keep you from going on. 



have the whole issue ready for the early out-going 
mail trains. To do this, the papers are sent into 
the mail room where they are handled as rapidly 
as they come in. One man with the aid of a 
labeling machine, called by printers a "mailer," 
pastes the individual addresses on the paprs, being 
careful to keep each postoffice list together. 

When the papers addressed to any one point are 
all labeled, an assistant takes them and wraps 
them into a bundle which he labels with the name 
of the postoffice to which it is to be sent. This is 
done with all the "outside" lists, and as fast as 
the papers are bundled they are thrown into mail- 
sacks and are taken directly to the depot and put 
on the proper trains. 

The city subscribers are served by carriers who 
are under the direction and control of the City 
Circulator. The carriers assemble at the printing 
office at the hour the papers "come from the 
press" and there meet the city circulator, who has 
a list of the several routes, which are numbered, 
and he also has each carrier's papers ready to give 
to him when called. The circulator calls the car- 
riers to him by crying the number of the route 
he desires to be served. The foutes are not 
called for in their numerical order, but by a sys- 
tem which enables the carriers for remote routes 
to get their papers earlier than the carriers of in- 
lying routes do. The carriers, on receiving their 
papers, fold them in suitable "bunches," put them 
in their sacks and distribute them to the subscrib- 
ers on their respective routes. 

The City Circulator also issues the papers neces- 
sary for the newsboys' sales. He verifies the 
automatic count of the press and then gives the 
papers to an assistant who sells them to the news- 
boys, who in turn re-sell them to their patrons on 
the street. 



THE DISTRIBUTION OF A LARGE DAILY. 



(Sramming 



One of the most marvelous features of our civ- 
ilization is the rapid spread of the newspaper. The 
newspaper consumes square miles upon square 
miles of forests, to meet the demand for paper. 
The manufacture of paper from wood pulp is one 
of our great industries. A remarkable fact is 
that often we get the news before it happens. The 
electric telegraph is responsible for this anamoly, 
but the energy of the great newspapers themselves 
is also taxed to its utmost to get the news to the 
reader while it is fresh. Very few people have 
any idea of the inside workings of a large daily. 
One small feature of the work — the distribution 
of the papers fresh from the press — is here de- 
scribed: 

The printed papers, as they come from the press, 
are counted by an automatic counter into bundles 
of a given number, generally fifty, and are sent 
immediately from the press room to the mail 
j-Qom. The first care of the mailing clerk is to 



Toward the end of the term, in the maelstrom 
of tests and examinations, there arises, amid the 
howls of the flunked and flunking, the stock ques- 
tion of College generations : Is cramming a re- 
liable and defensible method of preparing for an 
examination? This immediately leads to the less 
general question : Would a final examination 
system, involving more cramming, be a wise sys- 
tem — a system which might, with profit, be insti- 
tuted in place of the one at present in vogue in 
Oberlin ? 

The two systems, which, for the sake of con- 
venience, we will call the "daily grade" and the 
"final exam." system, both have their well defend- 
ed benefits, as well as their generally acknowledged 
weaknesses. Oberlin may be considered as a type 
of the first ; Harvard, or a typical German uni- 
versity, as an example of the latter. Let us con- 
sider the most evident advantages and disad- 
vantages of the two methods as experienced by 



THE TIGER 



the undergraduate in his candidacy for the A. B. 

In the "daily grade" system the student does, or 
is supposed to do, a reasonable amount of regular 
study each day. He keeps in touch with the work 
that is undertaken by the instructor, reads the as- 
signments, is present at all or nearly all lectures, 
is glib with a recitation, and is usually ready 
for a test with but little notice. This would seem 
to speak well for the method. On the other hand, 
however, a test on a certain part of the work hav- 
ing been given, the work which has been thus far 
covered is forever dropped. The student again 
devotes his attention to daily assignments until 
the next test is due. The test having been taken, 
the part which it was supposed to cover passes 
into oblivion and he turns his eyes to the next 
section — and so on ad infinitum. When the course 
has been completed, there is nothing in the way 
of a final examination which will draw together 
and tend to convert into a unit the results of the 
preceding weeks. To be sure, every part of the 
work has been covered by a test, but the knowl- 
edge that the whole will never be embraced by an 
all-inclusive examination tends to make the part 
that "came before the last test" sink into insig- 
nificance. 

The faults of the "final exam." system are not 
less obvious. In a college which employs this sys- 
tem, it is a precedented fact that less time — de- 
cidedly less time is given to the careful prepara- 
tion of daily work. The student, knowing the 
great importance that is attached to the final ex- 
amination, consciously or unconsciously neglects 
the daily assignments, trusting to make all right 
by a few weeks of concentrated effort immediate- 
ly preceding, the ordeal. He passes the examina- 
tion, and thus the advocate may say that he has a 
connected idea of the whole work, that he has 
clinched it by the all-inclusive test. But the ad- 
vocates of the system are likely to forget that a 
cursory knowledge of the half-year's work — knowl- 
edge gained in a few hours by the liberal appli- 
cation of midnight oil and strong coffee — perhaps 
whiskey and pretzels — is not knowledge that re- 
mains and leaves its mark. 

And so, while the "daily grade" system tends 
to leave the work of the course in a disconnected, 
shapeless mass of confused facts, or, at best, more 
or less hazy from beginning to end, the "final 
exam." system tends to the neglect of conscien- 
tious work and the frantic accumulation of useful 
but unmasticated facts on short notice. 

We are thus led to the obvious conclusion. The 
ideal method must evidently grow out of a com- 
bination of the two systems. With the daily 
work always above sea-level, the final examina- 
tion comes, not as a lamentable ordeal, accom- 
panied by the wailings of the procrastinator, but 
as a normal and natural review of the work of 
the course. — Oberlin Review. 



Minerva Gandy Pair. 

The event of the week for the College students 
as well as for society in general, will be the Miner- 
va Candy Fair. This will be held all day and 
evening Saturday, Jan. 21, at 108 North Tejon St. 

The room will be decorated with College colors 
and the different booths will be decorated in the 
colors of the different societies. At the Apolloni- 
an table will be found the nut candies and salted 
nuts; Miss Reinhardt will have charge of this 
table. Miss Trovinger, at the Pearsons table, will 
sell all kinds of taffy. Miss Leidigh will have 
charge of the fondant candies; this table will be 
decorated in Minerva's colors, blue and white. The 
panoche table will be decorated in carnation red, 
the colors of the Contemporary Society. At the 
Hypatia table Miss McKinnie will sell candied 
fruits and stuffed dates. Minerva's pledged mem- 
I'crs will decorate their table in Freshman colors 
and will sell mixed candies. The most popular 
table of all will probably be the demonstration 
table in charge of Miss Spalding. Here you can 
have candy made to order. During the afternoon 
and evening tea and chocolate will be served. In 
the evening there will be music and everyone. is 
invited to come and have a good time — and eat 
candy. 



LIBRARY ACCESSIONS. 



Among the most recent additions to the library 
may be mentioned the following : 

Ten volumes from the University of Chicago, 
printed under the heading, "Decennial Publica- 
tions" ; two copies of Boyeson's Goethe and Schil- 
ler. Not far from twenty-five volumes have been 
added to the history and political science depart- 
ment, including six volumes of reprints from the 
"Original Sources of European History." Per- 
haps fifteen books have been purchased for the 
aepartment of pedagogy and child study. Judge 
Cunningham presented "The Story of New Zea- 
land" to the history department. Harvard Uni- 
versity sent, during the month, a volume from her 
physical laboratory. Four volumes of the Cyclo- 
pedia of Engineering w^ere purchased by the 
Thomas F. Walsh fund. 

In addition to these, Mr. John Herron, of Tellu- 
ride, has given about 40 volumes to the Engineer- 
ing library. Mr. B. H. Bryant, formerly super- 
intendent of the Midland Railway, has loaned to 
the Engineering library about 60 volumes to be- 
come the property of Colorado College unless 
called for by him. These consist partly of "Trans- 
actions of the American Society of Civil Engin- 
eers" and bound copies of the Railroad Gazette 
and the Engineering News. 



THE TIGER. 



THE TIGE R, 

Published weekly during the College year by 
The Tiger Publishing Co., in the interest of Colo- 
rado College. 

J. Y. Crothers Editor-in-Chief 

T. Hunter Assistant Editor-in-Chief 

J. I. Muffley Athletic Editor 

Miriam Carpenter Literary Editor 

Mabel Barbee Alumni Editor 

A. H. Fisher Local Editor 

Bert Wasley Business Manager 

C. A. Hedblom .... Assistant Business Manager 

CORRESPONDENTS: 

Mr. Nash, Miss McDowell, Miss Isham, Miss 
Kidder, Mr. Lamb, Mr. Reeks, Miss Arbuckle. 

Subscription, $1.25 per year, payable in advance. 
Single copy, 5 cents. 

The Tiger is forwarded to all subscribers until 
ordered discontinued and all arrearanges are paid. 

Students, Professors and Alumni are invited 
to contribute literary articles, personals and items. 
Contributions must be accompanied by the writer's 
name. 

Address all communications to The Tiger. 
Colorado College, Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Entered at the Postoffice at Colorado Springs, 
Colo., as second-class matter. 



Patronize Tiger Advertisers 



EDITORIAL 



■' MINERVA CANDY SALE. 

Remember to save some cash for Saturday. The 
Minerva candy sale comes at that time, at 108 
N. Tejon St. The proceeds go toward the sub- 
scription of Minerva to the Athletic Association. 
The whole College applauded when Minerva made 
her magnificent subscription, and it is now up 
to the College to help them out. Forget the 
doctor's orders for once, and eat too much candy. 



DON'T FORGET. 

Friday evening the Y. M. C. A. will give a 
stag blow-out in the Gym to which all fellows of 
College and Academy are cordially invited. This 
blow-out after exams was started years ago, as a 
permanent feature of College life, but has been 
discontinued for some reason. All sorts of stunts 
are on the program, and a fine time guaranteed. 
Freshmen and Sophomores, bring your Webster 
spelling books along! 



The Man Behind. 

P\ URING the Spanish- American war we were 
given to understand that the reason for our 
marvelous victories was not so much the superior 
excellence of the American guns, but the skill of 
the American gunners. Not only did we feel 
proud that it was not the machinery but the man 
that did the effective work, but we were also very 
proud of the fact that it was the man of the ranks, 
not the officer, who made our navy what it was. 
The people of the United States have always cher- 
ished most carefully the idea that the man in the 
lowly sation in life is the one who makes things 
go. We do not despise superior ability in a com- 
mander, but we realize that without good timber 
to work with he cannot accomplish as much as a 
less brilliant man with the best of material. 

In our political institutions it is realized that 
reform must come from the bottom. A few of the 
largest municipalities of the country have realized 
this and have accomplished wonders in permanent 
reform. 

Anyone who has been president of a College 
organization has found that he cannot do the work 
that should be done by thirty or more students. 
It has been the fault of our College life this year 
that each individual has been inclined to shirk 
his responsibility when it has not been large. The 
students in the forefront of the struggle have 
done their best, but they have not always, not 
even often, received the backing of the private 
individual. No one blamed the coach or the cap- 
tain for our dismal failure in football. They did 
what they could, but it takes more than these two 
men to make a team. No one blames the president 
of tht Y. M. C. A. for the condition of that or- 
ganization during the present year. He has done 
what he could, but his other duties have taken 
so much of his time that it has been impossible 
for him to take on his shoulders the burdens 
that should be borne by cabinet and comn'iittees. 
These are unpleasant truths to be published 
abroad, but the present situation demands a treat- 
ment that will rouse the patient to a clear concep- 
tion of his condition. The patient is the student 
body. The things that need its support are the 
Tiger, the Nugget, the Oratorical Association, the 
Athletic Association. 

To follow Priscilla's advice, we shall speak for 
ourselves. The Tiger is published by a Board elect- 
ed from the student body, but that Board is not ex- 
pected to contribute all material which is printed 
in the paper. A very large part of the copy is 
expected from the students who are not connected 
with the Board at all. It i§ "the man behind" that 
is to make a success of your publication if it is to 
be a success. However, most of you have been 
so far behind that nothing has been seen or heard 
of you for the last four months. 

Don't be content to stay in the rear and guard 



THE TIGER. 



the baggage; there will be no flank attacks to 
occupy your attention. The fighting and the 
glory is all in front. You may find plenty of 
the former, and little of the latter, but a clear 
conscience will be an ample reward. 

If you hear next summer that your College's 
paper was not above the standard yours will be 
the disgrace, but if you hear that it was the best 
student paper in the state, you may well be proud 
— on condition that you had something to do with 
that excellence. 

If the s.tudents help as the should they will be 
.given a larger paper during the next semester 
than they have had during this, but it is only 
by their support that the enlarged paper can be 
maintained. It may be rather trite, but it is cer- 
tainly appropriate to suggest that as you see your 
duty, do it now. 



B. L. Rice, who is attending the Tennessee 
Theological Seminary, must be making a record 
similar to the one he made here. A clipping taken 
from the publication of that institution would lead 
one to think that "Buz" had been writing some 
more poetry or something else equally as apalling. 



ALUMNI NOTES. 



TIGER NOTES. 

Prof. Ahlers (German B) — I walked up and 
pulled the bell with a short prayer. 

It is rumored that one of the celestials is making 
hasty preparations for a wedding to take place 
Feb. 28, '05. 

"T" parties are coming to be a common thing 
at McGregor. 

See Currier for dancing lessons on ice. 



Nettie Wise, ex-'o4, is teaching in Joppa, Ala. 

R. N. Robertson, '01, is in the Engineering 
School at Cornell. 

Harriett Rogers, ex-'o2 is teaching in Central 
City. 

Fred Caldwell, 00, was a visitor in the Springs 
during the holidays. 

Frank Gleason, '02, is in the mercantile busi- 
ness in Cheyenne, Wyo. 

C. S. Ritter, ex-'97, is one of the successful 
architects of Philadelphia. 



Some people think they ought to drink a great 
deal of coffee this week. 

Contemporary — Friday, January 20. Election of 
officers. 

Miss Francis Sims has been spending the last 
few days at her home in Denver. 

Thanks to the cold weather cuts were plenti- 
ful last week. 



-, do you like 



In French. Prof. — "Miss — 
French?" 

Miss "Yes, sir." 

French (who sits in front of her) — "Too bad 
Leap Year is over." 




Miss Jessie Gordon, '04 

Spent Christmas Vacation in Colorado 

Springs. 



Miss K. (telling a story) — "They were engaged 
and were so happy, and so am I." 

For latest fashion in sleeves see Prof. Pattison. 



"The melancholy days are come." 

Room 29 was unusually cold last Thursday. 

The polar bear said last week the temperature 
reminded him more of home than it had any tim* 
since he joined the museum. He trotted all over 
the building, and could scarcely tell which room he 
enjoyed the most. 



Who said there was nothing new under the sun? 
How about a thunder storm in the middle of Jan- 
uary in Colorado Springs? 

The stag blow-out will make you forget all 
about the flunks. 



THE TIGER 



The officers of the Apollonian Club for the sec- 
ond semester are: Bert Wasley, Presitient; W. 
Nead, Vice-President; G. C. Lake, Secretary; 
Montgomery Smith, Treasurer; Marshall Darley, 
Sergeant-at-Arms. 

Pearsons has elected the following officers for 
the second semester: L. S. Bale, President; E. 
Reyer, Vice-President ; C. A. Hedblom, Secretary ; 
R. B. Shaw, Treasurer; M. C. Hall, Sergeant-at- 
Arms. 

Givens is in love, and it's no joke. 

The Nunca Tristes were delightfully enter- 
tained at cards by Miss Nannie Armstrong at 
her home Saturday afternoon. The game was 
progressive high-five. The first prize was won by 
Miss Carolyn Davis ; the consolation prize by Miss 
Lois Crane. A dainty luncheon was served. 



TIGER WANT ADS. 

'Tf you don't see what you want, ask for it." 
Remember to use the Tiger Want Columns. Rates 
one cent a line a week. Special rates to students. 

WANTED— Whole bunches of copy for the Ti- 
ger. Any person may drop an item or a two- 
page article in the TiGER box. It will receive our 
grateful consideration. 



LOST — One flunk notice. Finders keepers. Glad 
to get rid of it. Freshie. 

SITUATION WANTED— By Senior capable of 
teaching anything from kindergarten work to 
philosophy. Best of references. Moral character 
irreproachable. 

WANTED— More tickets to sell for Rip Van 
Winkle, Jan. 22,, by one who has sold out. 

CLAIRVOYANT— Is able to predict your suc- 
cess or failure in the flunk exam six weeks 
hence. Office hours i to 2 a. m. Come early 
and avoid the rush. Office in belfry of Cutler. 

FOR SALE— All kinds of candies of but one 
quality — the best. 108 N. Tejon St., Saturday, 
Jan. 21. 

WANTED— By the Nugget Board, your ideas if 
you have any; your photos if you are supposed 
to have them ; your subscription anyway. 

LOST — That's what my eyesight will be if Co- 
burn Library is not lighted better. 

FOUND — A cold while being refrigerated in 
Palmer Hall last week. Owner may have same 
by calling at the office and paying for this ad. 



-^F^f^f^f^4f^F^f^F4^<f4f^F^f0^ 




Outlook 



As soon as the mid-year examinations are over 
the minds of the boys of Colorado College turn 
to baseball, and this year is no exception. Last 
year we thought the baseball enthusiasts thought 
that C. C. had the best bunch of ball-tossers that 
had ever represented the College, but the material 
this year is as good, and in some respects better. 
We miss that captain of captains, the scrappy, 



hustling Reed, on first base. Howell has graduat- 
ed from the backstop position, and Pettibone will 
no more be seen at shortstop. But Hester, who has 
done some great twirling, is here for his final 
try at the championship. He will lead the team 
as captain. Billy Johnston than whom there was 
no better second baseman in the league last year, 
will again be on second. He should be the star 
infielder of the league this year. 

Leuchtenberg, the king of outfielders among the 
Colleges of last year, will again have his usual 
number of outs. By the form that Leut displayed 
last year he should be a tower of strength to this 
year's bunch. 



THE TIGER. 



Jimmy Falk, the scrappy and spectacular little 
third baseman, will likely try for his old position. 
He surely knows it and plays it about right. 
Mitchell, who was Howell's understudy last year, 
will be on hand to receive Hester's benders. Un- 
der Sollenberger's tuition Mitchell developed 
greatly last summer and should be an able suc- 
cessor to Howell. 

The positions of first baseman, shortstop and 
two field positions will be filled from a number 



o^' promising young players. 

Anderson, who showed up well last year, will 
be a candidate for a position, as will also Smith, 
West, Tegtmeyer, Steinmetz, Tyler, McCreery, 
Vandemoer and Roe. There are several players 
of ability in College who have never tried to make 
the team. This is the year to get out and try. 
Start with the squad and fight hard for, a place, 
for you ought to be on the Colorado College cham- 
pionship team of 1905. 



^f^f^P^l^^f4f^F0^f^f^f4f^f4f^^ 



The Opening of the 




Friday night was another landmark in the his- 
tory of the Pearsons Literary Society when the 
doors of the long wished for and much planned 
Club House were opened. And it is a Club House 
m every sense of the word with two big loung- 
ing and reading rooms, a fine main auditorium 
and cloak rooms and store rooms in abundance. 
The exterior is at present very deceptive, granted 
but the inside is what really counts and everyone 
who has had the pleasure of examining the various 
rooms is of one mind that Pearsons has the fin- 
est Club House on the campus and one which 
will long be the pride of those who have brought 
about its completion. As to the opening night, the 
real house warming, it was the real thing and 
just what might have been expected. The first 
part of the evening was spent wandering thro' the 
various rooms and examining their furnishings 
and the pretty things which were scattered here 
and there around them. Then all adjourned to 
he main auditorium where the program of the 
evening was given. The string trio, violin, violin- 
cello and piano, Messrs. Nash, Goldfrank and 
Doane, played a number of times and then the 
curtain went up on the main feature of the eve- 
ning, a two-act farce. 

The whole was a charming production, the 
young ladies, Messrs. Cobert, Moore and Mc- 
Creery made hits of various sorts, but Mr. Co- 
bert in the heavy weeping act, occasioned by his 
or her being turned down by the cruel Mr. Shaw, 
certainly took the cake, with Moore and McCreery 
close seconds, in the former's general acting and 
the latter's brilliant auburn wig. Mr. Givens and 
Mr. Shaw both did excellent work, in fact the 



© 



Cttib Hotise 

play hardly brought out any particular star, but 
was just fun from start to finish. 

After a selection by the vocal quartette the so- 
ciety and their lady friends partook of light re- 
freshments and completed another tour of the 
building and then, at the usual sign from the 
chaperones, broke up for the evening. 

It was a fitting opening for the new building 
and as improvements are added from time to time 
and the rooms filled with more furniture and pic- 
tures, it will be an ideal house for the most fas- 
tidious. The regular meetings will now be held 
each Friday evening at 7 130, while the Contempo- 
rary Society will hold their meetings in the same 
place in the afternoon. 



CONTEMPORARY. 



The Contemporary Club was most charmingly 
entertained last Friday by Prof, and Mrs. Gile. 
Prof. Gile read an extremely interesting paper on 
"Japan's Position in the World Today," in which 
he brought out strikingly the rapid development 
of that little country during the last half century. 
Coffee and chocolate were served in the dining 
room, which was prettily decorated in Contempo- 
rary red. 



EXCHANGES. 

HER FIRST CONCERN. 

Disturbed by the kiss of the magic prince, the 
sleeping beauty awoke. 

''Dear me!" she said. "I just know my hair 
is a perfect fright !" — Chicago Tribune. 



IC 



THE TIGER 




SCHOOLING ENOUGH. 

A school board official called at the home of a 
pupil whose absence had extended over a week, 
and inquired of the lad's mother the cause. 

"Why," she said, "he's past his thirteenth year, 
an' me an' his father think he's after having 
schooling enough. 

"Schooling enough ! Why, I did not finish m>/ 
education until I was twenty-three." 

"Be that so?" said the mother, "but that lad 
of ours has got brains." — Birmingham {England) 
Post. 

A lady student of Morgantown, gives the fol- 
lowing classification as the result of a careful 
analysis of the student boys of the university: 

1. Boys who don't care for girls at all. 

2. Boys who don't have a girl at home, but 
hope to find one here. 

3. Boys who have one girl at home and many 
here. 

4. Boys who have one girl at home and don't 
care for any other. — The Athenaeum. 

A youth went forth to serenade 

The lady he loved best, 
And by her house at evening, 

When the sun had gone to rest. 
He warbled until daylight; 

And would have warbled more, 
But morning light disclosed a sign 

"To Let" upon the door. 

— Exchange. 

Senior — "My mind to me a kingdom is." 
Freshman — "Then 'tis a limited monarchy." 



Mother — "Billy, your face is very clean, but 
how did you get so much dirt on your hands?" 
Billy--"Washin' me face." 

Wife — "When I die I'll ask Shapespeare who 
wrote Hamlet." 

Husband — "What if Shakespeare is not in 
Heaven?" 

Wife — "Then you ask him." 

May I print a kiss upon your lips? 

She nodded her sweet permission. 
We went to press and I rather guess 

We printed a full edition. 

Winsome — "Did you ever hear a tramp jest?" 
Lonesome — "No. but I've heard a bum joke." 

A clergyman told in his text 

How Samson was barbered and 'vexed. 

And told it so true 

That a man in the pew 
Got rattled and shouted out, "Next." 

— Exchange. 

Excited Lady (at the telephone) — "I want my 
husband, please, at once." 

Telephone Gorl (from the Exchange) — "Num- 
ber, please !" — Exchange. 

Read the following : "He that bloweth not his 
own horn, the same shall not be blowed." 

Students, if in need of glasses or repairs on 
same, see Ashby, the Optical Jeweler, the oldest 
established in the county. You will find every- 
thing right. 



I 



THE TIGER 



11 





Qfzi a Practical Edu- 
cation at Henaget^s 
Business College 

J 09 N. TEJON 

l>lev^) Students can enter at any 
time. Day and Night Sessions 

Positions Guaranteed 



We pledge oursethes to get a good position 
for e'bery student that completes our Combi- 
nation course. Call at College office or address 



Phone Black 23 J 



J. C- HENAGER, 

President, 



THB TIGBR 



Only line 
running trains 

through 

Manitou and 

Victor en route 

to 
Cripple Creek 



NidlaLiid Route 

Cripple Creek District 



50 

Miles 

Crowded 

with 

Matchless 
Scenery 



The Popular Through Line between Denver, Colorado Springs, 
Pueblo and the Cripple Creek District. 



J. H. WATERS, 

Pres. and Gen'l Mgr., 



Cripple Creek, 
Colo. 



J. B. WIGGENHORN, 
G. r. A. 



College Pillow Tops for 
CKristma^s 

ASHFO&D «l ROBERTS 

^ytrt and ^ytationery Co. 

126 N. Tejon 

15 per cent discount to students on frsLming 



When in doubt, take the safe side. 
Send bundles to the 

Colorado Springs Laundry 



Est. 20 yrs. 



Ralph Rice, College Agt. 



Bookkeeping 

Shorthand 

Typewriting 



CENTRAL 



*B. 



usiness 



College 



College Estab- 
lished in 
Denver in 1887 



L. A. ARNOLD, Pres. J. C. CROY, Prin. 

Nichols Block, 18 and 20 S. Tejon St., 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Rooms inviting, Work Thorough, Teachers up-to-date 

Call or Write for Information. 



C. W. WARSOP & CO., 



205 N. Telon St. 



Draperies, Upholstery Goods, Furniture. Complete line of Screens, 
Pillows, Pillow Tops, Couch Covers, etc. 



The 50-mile-an-hour Wheel 


THE CRESCENT 


Reading Standard Bicycles 

Wm & KlU(iS Opposite Fla^a Hotel 


BOWLING ALLEYS 

115-117 North Cascade Ave. 




Prof. Chas. J, Hausdorf, 

TEACHER OF MANDOLIN, GUITAR AND BANJO. 

Vlusic furnished for weddings, receptions^ enter- 
tainments, etc. 

21 North lejon. 


Telephone Main 863 
E. S. SOLLENBERGER, Mgr. 

Private Alleys for Ladies 
Eight Alleys on one Floor 
Special Rates to Parties and Clubs 


FRANK F. CRIMP 

FLORIST 

Phone 500 509 E. Columbia St. 

Special attention given to Telephone Orders. 


H. E. BOATRIGHT 

!Public Steno£rrapher 

33 GIDDINGS BLDG. 
Rates oc per 100 words, 50c per hr. extra carbons 5c per page 



THB TIGER 



13 



WHEN IN NEED OF CLOTHING, HATS 
OR FURNISHINGS 

We would suggest that you consult your 

professor as to the best place lo go. 

We are willing to abide by their 

judgement as they all trade 

with us. We give spe- 

ial discount to students 

The B. W. DAVIS CLOTHING & FUR- 
NISHING CO., 102 N. Tejon St. 



The Williafflson=Haffner 
Engraving Company 



1633 Arapahoe Street 



DENVER 



0/-. 7{/. bowler, 

DENTIST 



IS South Tjej'on St, 



G. W. Pauly, B. S., D. O. Mrs. Lona E. Pauly, B. S. D. O. 

Graduates of A. T. Still's College of Osteopathy, 

Kirksville, Mo. 

DR. & MRS. PAULY, ?I7s?Ji*/nT 

Office, rooms 303-30i DeGraff Bldg. 118 N. Tejon St., Colo- 
rado Springs, Colo. Phones— Office Ked 1272; Res. Red 323 
Hours 8 to 12 a . m . , 1 toi»5 p.m. 



F» H* Weeks 

26 East Bijou St. 

Photographs taken any hour 
of the day or evening by 
flashlight. Especially suit- 
able for groups. Call and see 
samples. 

Special Kates tj Sti\deAts 



next 



You are next to a good hair cut or shave when you patronize 



The Manhattan Barber Shop, J. R. WEYMAR, Prop. 3o e. bijou 



10 per ct Discount 

On All Boots and Shoes 
To College Students. 

(Ladies' Queen Quality excepted J 

WHITAKER & GARDNER 

30 N. TEJON ST. 


/W=^TaUND|?v 


THE STAR is the leader for prompt 
and satisfactory service. 

SPECIAL RATES to students of col- 
lege and academy 

S. E. BENNETT, College Ag't. 


CHARLES P. BENNETT 


w. I. Lueas 




Columbia, Hartford, Rambler, Ideal & Tribune Bicycles 


Real Estate, Loans 
and Insurance*^ ^ 

NO. 5 PIKE'S PEAK AVENUE 


The only first-class re 1 air shop in town. Chainless wheels 
a specialty. Wheels for rent. Phone 517-1 1 29 N. Tejon 

Students wishing a Special Course in Drawing, 
Water Colors, Oil or China Painting*^ should call 
at Art Studio, 108 N. Tejon MARIE R. FORBISH, 
Member of Art Institute, Chicago. 



44 



Hart, Schaffner & Marx Clothing. 

Paragon" Trousers. *^^^^ Hawes & Guyer Hats, 



14 



THE TIGER 



Colorado College 



THE OLDEST INSTITUTION FOR 
HIGHER EDUCATION IN THE WEST 

FOUNDED AT COLORADO 
SPRINGS IN J874 



Colorado College now offers advantages of the same 
grade as the best institutions. 

For information concerning Courses of Study, Roorns 
and Board, Physical Culture, etc., apply to 

WM. F. SLOCUM, President, 
or EDWARD S. PARSONS, Dean. 

For information in regard to the College Department of 
Music, inquire of 

EDWARD S. PARSONS, Dean. 

Those wishing information as to the Courses in Drawing, 
Painting, Designing, etc., etc., inquire of 

EDWARD S. PARSONS, Dean. 

For information concerning the Engineering Depart- 
ment, apply to 

FLORIAN CAJORI, 
Dean of Engineering School. 



Cutler Academy 



Cutler Academy is the Associated Prepartory School of 
Colorado College, in which students are prepared for any 
American College. Address, 

M. C. GILE, Principal. 



THE TIGER. 



15 



The Albert Sechrist Manufacturing Co. 

WILL INSTALL GAS and 



1033 t6th 
Street 




ELECTRIC FIXTURES 

in your residence at Colorado Springs 
same price as Denver, without extra 
charge. Call and select your fixtures, 
or will send you a catalogue. 



DENVLR, 
COLO. 





"THE LINE THAT SUITS THEM ALL." 

INOW, JUSr REMEMBER 

That the shortest, best and quickest line between Cripple Creek, Leadville, 
Aspen, Salt Lake and the West is Via 

The Colorado Midland Railway 

''It's the MidiaQd Route that's Popular 

R. T. DUNAWAY, C. P. A., Colorado Springs. 
C. H. SPEERS, H. C. BUSH, 

Gen. Pass. Agent. Traffic Manager. 

810 17th Street, Denver. 



Our Microscopes, Microtomes, Laboratory Glass- 
ware^ Ctietnical Apparatus, Chemicals, Piioto I 
Lenses and Sliutters, Field Glasses, Projection 
Apparatus, Plioto-Micro Cameras are used by| 
tlie leading Lab- ^^^^^^ oratories and 
Gover'nt Dep'ts^^^H^ Round the World 



SCOPES 



Catalogs ^^^^^^M Free 

Bausch & Lomb Opt. Co. 

.^ Rochester, N. Y. 

New York Chicago Boston Frankfurt, G y 



ST. JOHN & BARNES 

Oldest and largest plumbing and heating 

establishment in city. Your 

patronage solicited 



Telephone 13 



206 N. Tejon St 



Coal S2.00 per ton. 
Txidor CoqlI Co., 



C3r. Cascade a^Acl Cucharras. 



Phone 
676-B 



^ to agon Load of ^ ^ 

New Wood Type 

And OiHer Ms^teria^ls 

OfthcOery L,a1esi at your l>Upo>salfor 

Wirvdow Cscrds 
Tickets, Flyers ejc 

BJSfCRAX^I^fC — Uhe Finest 

The Telegraph Job Rooms 119 e. p. p. Ave. 



Ask wKere TKe Tiger is Printed 



The ©Id 

Curio Store 

Wholesale and Retail 
Dealers in 

GENUINE INDIAN GOODS AND 
CURIOSITIES 

J. S. CANDELARIO, Prop., 

301 and 303 San Francisco Street, 

SANTA FE, N. M. 



Colorado School of Scientific Physical Culture. 

THOS. R. DALY. 410 Mining Exchange Building. PHONE RED r82r. 



i6 



THB TIGBR. 



El Paso Cleaning & Tailoring C0> Pressing Dyeing Altering 

10 E. Kiowa St. Phone Main 667=A Colo. Springs Cleaning Repairing Tailoring 



The 



Hassell Iron Works Co. 



Founders and Machinists 



Office Phone 509-B 



Residence Phone Red 87 



DR. HARRY L. MOREHOUSE 

DENTIST 



Hours 9-12, 1:30-3 



First Nat'l Banlt BIdg., room 8 



C. F. Arcularius & Co. 
Jewelers 

Diamonds and Watches 

Fine Jewelry Manufacturing 

9 South Tejon St. Coiorado Springs 



The 



Crissey & Fowler Lumber 
Company 



Phone 101 



117 to 123 West Vermijo Ave. 



Phone 540 

Monarch Hand 
Laundry 

421 S. Tejon 

KARL L. IV10HLER, Prop. 
W. J. WALLRICH, College Agt. 

WE LaUNOER HXYTHING 

FINE CHOCOLATE BON BONS 



Name on every Piece 

Ice Cream, Hot and Cold 
Sodas 

Fresh Candies madeexery hour 



LNION ICE AND COAL COMPANY 

W. M. BANNING, Prop. 




goal» mood atid Tee 

Dealers in all kinds of Coal and Artificial and 
Natural Ice 

Yard Office, 105 W. Vermijo Ave. City Office, 5 N. Tejon 




JOHN MOFFAT 

Tine Cailoring 

Repairing, Cleaning, Pressing. Special rates to 
College Students 

Over Walling's Book Store 16 South Tejon St. 



Carriages, Cabs, 

'Busses, Baggage and 

Transfer Wagons 

Office, 15 North Cascade 



Denver Law School 

Law Department of the 
University of Denver 

Three years' course leading to the degree of 
Bachelor of Laws. Courses in Mining and Irri- 
gation Law. Full resident faculty. For informa- 
tion address 

LUCIUS W. HOYT, Dean 

Ernest & Cranmer BIdg., Denver, Colo. 

Old You Know 

That our stock of package crackers is so 
great in its variety that you could have a 
change for every day for more than two 
months and yet not exhaust our list? Well, 
it's a fact. We have a kind for every pos- 
sible time and occasion — and they are all 
good. Finest bakery goods in the city. 
Fancy Groceries 

W. N. BURGESS, 112 N. Tejon St. 

Titsworth & Davidson 
DAIRY 

2 IVflLES S. E. or COLORADO SPRINGS. P. 0. BOX 6 

The Hoack=Davidson Coal and Transfer Co. 

Dealers In 

CANON CITY, MAITLAND 

AND LIGNITE COAL 

Phone 473-B. Office US N. Tejon. P. O. Box 257 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 



******^*****4f***^^*^****^^*^**4>4'4>^^**4'4^**** 






ee 






U^e Gowdy-Simmons Printing Comparvy 

FOR WINDOW CARDS, TICKETS, ETC. ENGRAVED 
CARDS AND INVITATIONS ON SHORT NOTICE 



4* 
2/ 7/orth ♦ 

Tjw/on Si, 4 

4* 



Phone Main 151 



Established 1897 



P> W> SMITH, 

FAMILY GROCER, TEA AND 
COFFEE MERCHANT . : : : : 
Orders Called for and Pramptly Delivered 

717 N. Weber St. Colorado Springs, Colo. 



♦ 
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I S- JAMES fe SON, Props. 

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THE DERN TEA AND COFFEE CO. 

Dealers in TEAS, COFFEES, SPICES, 
EXTRACTS. BAKING POWDERS, Etc. 



Phone 575 



29 S. Tejon St. ^ 



The People's Gtocery and Matket 



PHONE MAIN 868 



222 EAST PIKE'S PEAK 



Colorado Springs, Colorado ♦ 



jif* 



iPhotoffraphs 



at BINGHAM & WOOD'S. 18 S. Tejon ♦ 



GREENHOUSES: Cor. Platte and Wasatch. 

J. B. Braidwood, 

succEssoRTo W|LLUM CLARK, 

Florist. 



Established 1873. 

PHONE 28. 



For your furnatce* buy 

"DANVILLrE" 

TKe BEST Lignite CoolI 

The Colofado Springs 

TJ I |-« 112 Tikfi'-f TeaK A-Oe. 

niei VrfO. ■Phone* 230-213 




(Ask your dealer for 

VICTOR 

Athletic 
Supplies 

HELP THE TIGER 

by fcttying 

Scott Bicycle Tbes 

Write as if yo0 cannot get them of 
yotft dealer. 

THE SCOTT SUPPLY & TOOL CO. 

DENVER, COLO. 



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The Colorado Springs Electric Co. : 



; USE ELECTRIC LIGHT 
♦ IN YOUR HOMES 

4» 

4> ♦ ♦ 4 ♦ ♦#%^%'<l» ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦4>«l>4>«4»««44*'l*4*4»4>4*<»«»«<l*4*4>«4»4 4*i| 



♦ ♦♦♦♦4i4*4»'l*4>4*'l*4» 



The Yoxiti^ Men^s Store* 



4> ♦ ♦ 4* ♦ 4* ♦ 4* ♦ 4> 



We Have a $10.00 Suit Sale On. 



4> 
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t SPECIAL DISCOUNT 
J TO ALL STUDENTS 



It is a good thing right after Xmas, when a fellow has spent about all he has. 
We are offering between 150 and 200 Suits worth from $13.50 to $20.00, at $10.00. 



In this 



of Suits are several Blues and Blacks. 



HOLBROOK & PERKINS * 



THE DENVER FIRE CLAY CO. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 
AND DEALERS IN 



I Chemical and Physicial Apparatus and Chemicals 



I r742-l746 Champa Street, 

♦ 



A FULL LINE OF UBORATORY SUPPLIES AND ASSAY GOODS 
Write f«r Illustrated Catalogues 



A. H. WHAITE & COMPANY, 



Men^s and Boys^ Outfitters. 



18 and 20 South Tcjon Street, 



DENVER, COLORADO ♦ 

♦ 

♦ 



« H. C COLBURN, Pfes. 



T/>e ^ylnfier^f ^yiufotnobile Co. 



E. A. COLBURN, Jr., Sec'y and Treat. ^ 



♦ 1^IVIL^K.Y» 5IlJt<A.UlLrt K^lLrfAIKIINU ♦ 

^ Telephone Main 122 S-IO /f, ffetfada A.H)e, Colorado Spring's, Colo, ^ 



LIVERY. STORAGE. REPAIRING 




O. E HEMENWAY 



Groceries and Meats 



US South Tejon St* 
Colorado Springs^ Colorado 




♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 



CA^^U^TMC^/^i./^ i^ / ir*'''i'iX**-*5/ 



h €^- ^'^^•-A^ 



!«£ TIGBR 



Colorado College 



\ 




/ 



JANVAR.Y 26tK, 1905 

VOl^VAfJE VII. JSfumber 17. 



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Special Rates to Students 

On Rented Pianos 




The KNIGHT - eHMPBELL 
Music (Company 



New Lennox Block 



Opposite North Park 



St. John Bros.r""*'™'"' 

Gas and Steam Fitters 

Hot Water Heating a Specialty 

Prompt attention given to Repair Work. 

Curtis g oal go. 

Office 132 N. Tefoki St. Telephone 91. 

Try "NEW RANGE" for the Kitchen, $4.00. 
BITUMNOUS COAL AT STANDARD PRICES. 

SELDOMRIDGE BROTHERS, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

Flour, Feed, Grain, Hay and Seeds 

108 South Tejon Street 

Repairing while You Wait Satisfaction Guaranteed 

A complete plant of New Machinery for 
the Manufacture of Fine Boots and Shoes 

The Lightning Shoe Shop 

BROWN & COMPANY 
We make a specialty of Shoes to Measure and Shoes for 
Cripples. 2814 North Tejon St. CoiiORADo Spbings 

Visiting Cards in Latest Styles. 

■ I ill—W Btf^— i— !■ PIIIM I mil W Ml 

WE SHOW gy advertising in THE TIGER that we 
lOU.... ....... appreciate your custom. 

22 E. Kiowa St. Thc Pfofflpt Prifltefy 

NEW : EMPIRE : THEATRE 

lOc VAUDLVILLE Wc 

3— SHOWS DAILY— 3 
I Matinee, 3 p. m. Evenings, 7:30 and 8:45. 



♦ ♦♦♦ 4* ♦♦ ♦•4* ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦•»♦♦ 4> ♦ 

Elegant : 

Pfin^tfic Artistic in Posing, J 
1. IIUIUO Lighting and Finisli ♦ 



Discount to Students 




TTUm j 



Phone 679-a 
Corner Cascade and Kiowa 



COLLEGE GOWNS, CAPS 

The Best Workmanship 
at Lowest Prices 

Silk Faculty Gowns and Hoods 



COX SONS & VINING 

262 Fourth Avenue., NE\^" YORK 




SKATES 

Hockey Sticks 

^nlSWEATERS 

Basket Ball and 
Y. M. e. H. Suits 

at Strangs 

119 North Tejon Street 

Mueth's 

Soda, Ice eream 

e^TERING 

CHAS. T. FERTIG 

9^ea/ -Estate, Loans and Insurance 

29 N. Tejon Street 

ZjAe Colorado Spn'nys <^ioral Co* 

FLORISTS 



/O'^ ^ortA "Ue/ort S/r-o«f 



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Phone 556-B 



DOVGLAS eSk HKTHKItlNGTON 

^rchifect>s 

Rooms 15-16 Outwest Building, Colorado Springs, Colo. 



4"l>4*<i'4i4>4>«i*4><»4>4>4>4i«4>«»4>4*4>«l>4*«4>«l»4*4*4i4'««4»'i>4»4>4*«4*4>4>4>4*4>4>4>4> 



THE TIGER. 



Student's Book Store Books, stationery; an Engi- 

neer's Supplies; College Pins 



and Watch Fobs, 
and up. 



Century Fountain Pens $1 to $4, Waterman's $2.50 

REYER & PLATL 

For $1 00 per month ' ^"'* sponged and Pressed each week 

'■ PANTATORIUIVI. 

17 East Bijou, Branch Office opp. Plaza Hotel. 



THE COLORADO SPRINGS CO, 

The Original Locators of 

Colorado Spr/nys and 9/faniiou 

is still offering for sale choice 
lots on North Weber Street 
and North Wahsatch Avenue 

Also lots for sale in other parts of Colorado Springs 
and in Manitou 

Apply at ROOMS, OUTWEST BUILDING 



LOUIS STOCK 

Office and Works, J3 E. Kiowa St. 

TELEPHONE 452-A. 

Cleaning, Dyeiug, Scouring in all its branches 

Ostrich Plumes Cleaned, Dyed and Curled 

Kid Gloves Dyed and Cleaned. 



GIDDINGS BROS. 

FINE DRESS GOODS AND LADIES' 

TAILOR Suits, Ladies' 
^^ Furnishings 



Kiowa and Tejon Streets. 



We do Everything in the Tailoring 
Line 

J. B, CORRIN 

103 E. Bijou St. COLORADO SPRINGS, COLO. 

D. E. MONROE & CO. 
Prescription Drugaist 

The best of Drugs, Stationery and Toilet Articles 

NO LIQUORS SOLD. 
eor. Teion Sf Bijou Pbone 311 St 331 

THE HEFLEY-ARCUURIIS DRUG CO. 
Drudalsts 

Kodaks, Cameras and all kinds of Photographic 
Supplies. Developing and Printing for Amatuers. 
Free Delivery. 
Phone 144 21 South Tejon Street 



liardware Bicycles 

fl. S. BLHKE 

New Chainless Bicycle $35 and $20 

Rambler, Orient and National Automobiles 

Best Repair Shop in city 107 W. Celow 

I11r$« l)« R« Crooks 

Coilct Parlors at 20 East Kioiva 

Also Room 52, Antlers Hotel 

No Apprentices. Only experienced help employed. 

A COMPLETE ENCYCLOPEDIA OE AMATEUR SPORT 

SPALDINGS OFFICIAL ATHLETIC ALWANAC 

for 1905. Edited by J. E. Sullivan. 

(Chief of Department of Physical Culture, Louisiana 
Purchase Exposition.) 
Should be read by every student, as it contains the re- 
cords of athletes and all amateur events in this country 
and abroad. It also contains a complete review of the 
Olympic Games from the official report of Director Sul- 
livan and a resume of the two days devoted to sports in 
which savages were the only contestants, in which it is 
proved conclusively that savages are not the born ath- 
letes we have heretofore supposed them to be. This is 
the first time in which the athletic performance of s iv- 
ages have ever been systematically recorded. 

This is the largest Athletic Almanac ever published, 
containing 320 pages. Numerous illustrations of promi- 
nent athletics and track teams. 

PRICE, lO CEINTS 
For sale by all newsdealers and 
A. G. SPALDirVG dfe BROS. 
New York, Chicago, St. Louis, Philadelphia, San Fran- 
cisco, Kansas City, Buffalo. Denver, Washington, Boston, 
Baltimore, Pittsburg, Minneapolis, New Orleans, Cin- 
cinnati, Syracuse, Montreal, Can., London, Eng. 
Send for a copy of Spalding's Athletic Goods 
Catalogue. It's free. 

HENRY TAMM 

Druggist 

PRESCRIPTIONS 
TOILET ARTICLES 
STATIONERY 

All Popular Drinks Served 
at our Soda Fountain 

Plaza Hotel, Cor. Cache la Poadre & Tejon Sts. 

THE Rl]GBY=PRIMROSE COAL CO. 

Hll Kinds of Fuel 

Phone 481-A West 44-A 21 N. TEJON ST. 



H.KRHNZ 



POReELHIN 

H. KRHNZ & 

Only 8 Chair Barber Shop in the City 

lOeVz B. Pike's Peak 21ve. 



P. R. SMITH 



BaTH TUBS 

e©., Barbers 

Try the t lectric Vibrassage Machine 
eOLGRADO SPRINGS. eOLO. 



THE TIGBR. 



DR,. SCHADT 

SPECIALTY "PRACTICE 

The Scientific Examination of your eyes and fitting of 
glasses. Special Discount to students. Consultation free. 
Office— 303 Colorado Bldg., corner Tejon and Huerfano Sts. 

Zehner Jewelry Co*, 

26 Pikers Peak Avenue. 

CTI iriFWTQ--- We have a fine assortment of goods 
aiULTLIIIIO on hand. CALL AND SEE THEM 



We sell a GOOD FOUNTAIN PEN for $i 

WHITNEY & GRIMWOOD 

Opera House Building 

We are agents for WATERMAN'S IDEAL FOUNTAIN 
Pens. Prices from $2.50 up. 



Watchmaker and Jeweler 

15 South TJejon St, 





1739 Champa St., DENVER, COLO, 







Come in and asK. questions 



"Frenzied Finance" does not include invest- 
ments in Colorado & Southern Railway tickets, 
but on the other hand you are certain of good 
returns, which are bound to please and satisfy 
you. 



Avoid the last moment's worry, caused by pur- 
chasing- tickets at Depot, by coming; in at the New 
city office. No. 119 E. Pike's Peak, and let us fix 
you out the day before. Money back if ticket is 
not used.' Remember that. 

J. H. Springer, 
Commercial Ag-ent. 



PHOTOGRAPHS at Popular Prices 

at MERRICK'S, 30 SOUTH TEJON ST- 

If you want to give pictures to college friends it will not be so expensive if yott have your work done here. 

FRANK H. SMALL watches, Diamonds, fine Watch Work. Special 
Jeweler and Silversmith Price to Students. 113 Pike's Peak Ave. 



Vol. VII. 



Vhe TIGCR 



COLORADO COLLEGE, JANUARY 26. 1905. 



No. 17 



Why the Rocky Mountain Region Needs 
a School of Engineering. 

BY DR. FLORIAN CAJORL 



The most effective educational and social ef 
fort is centered in localities where the need o 
such effort is most imperative. This idea is em- 
bodied in the social settlements of populous ♦cities, 
made with the purpose of bettering the condi- 
tion of the lower classes. To reach these classes 
it is deemed necessary for men of education, high 
ideals, and force of character, to settle down and 
live in their very midst. The Hull house, in Chi- 
cago, as well as Toynbee hall, and the Mansfield 
house in London, are located in the very slums 
of these large cities. 

Proper localization of effort has also accelerat- 
ed the progress of science. Research work can 
be undertaken in some places more advantageously 
than in others. Thus, Cuba was fitly chosen as 
the place for the investigation of the yellow fever, 
Mt. Hamilton, because of its favorable atmos- 
pheric conditions, was selected as a place for the 
study of the sky. 

The importance of the careful localization of 
effort along the lines of education has been re- 
peatedly demonstrated. If we consider the mat- 
ter from the standpoint of technical education, 
we find that in England the leading technical 
schools were established at the great industrial 
centers, and were planned to meet the needs of 
the various local industries. 

Thus, in the technical school at Sheffield, spe- 
cial prominence is given to instruction in metal- 
lurgy and engineering. The leading industry of 
the district occupies a central position in the 
course of study. A small steel works plant has 
been erected and appliances for metallurgical anal- 
ysis are provided. 

Again, the courses of instruction in the theory 
and practice of coal mining at the Yorkeshire 
college at Leeds, indicate the pains that are 
taken there to give students a careful and com- 
plete preparation for pursuing the principal in- 
dustry of the district. 

Celebrated are the technical schools at Man- 
chester and Birmingham. In scope, purpose and 
magnitude they rank among the great technical 
schools of the world. 



f«^i 



Germany has shown great wisdom in the found- 
ing and conducting of technical schools. She has 
seen more clearly than England the value of thor- 
ough scientific education. At the same time, she 
has exercised great care in selecting proper locali- 
ties for her schools. The technical schools at 
Chemnitz, Munich, Hamburg, and other places, 
might be considered from this point of view. 
At Essen an industrial school was founded by 
Krupp, who was the head of the famous steel 
works, and we are told that the firm has received 
large reflex benefits from their well-directed en- 
terprise and philanthropy. 

Most interesting information is given by Dr. 
Ross in a report on '-Chemical Instruction and 
Chemical Industries in Germany." He claims 
that the great development of chemical industries 
in Germany is due very largely to the foresight 
in providing facilities for the thorough training 
of chemists. In 1882 a professor in Munich suc- 
ceeded in producing in a test tube, by artificial 
means, a small quantity of indigo. This apparent- 
ly insignificant discovery was followed up and the 
result is that the importation into Germany of 
natural indigo has ceased ; the artificial produc- 
tion is cheaper, and at the same time of superior 
quality . In the color industry Germany has suc- 
ceeded in capturing the markets of the world. 
This is a most interesting example of the inti- 
mate relationship befween pure and applied sci- 
ence. 

One of the very recent instances of educational 
efforts along technical lines in a locality which is 
likely to reap rich benefits therefrom, is the 
projected Carnegie Technical school in Pittsburg, 
Pa. The facilities for education in applied science 
bearing on the local industries, will be at the very 
doors of its citizens. What a stimulus for gifted 
young men to receive thorough scientific edu- 
cation. Who knows but what such a school ad- 
joining the great manufacturies of iron, steel and 
copper, will do Work which some day may lead 
to vital improvements in the metallurgy of these 
metals. 

The reader is invited to apply to the state of 



THE TIGER. 



Colorado these thoughts on the location of schools 
of technology in places where the technological 
pursuits are most intense. 

Are there not conditions in our state which call 
for efforts of the very highest order along the 
lines of technical education? 'i'he Rocky Moun- 
tain region has water power in some localities 
that is only partially utilized, while in other local- 
ities there is a total absence of such power. This 
suggests the need of further improvements in the 
long distance transmission of power. 

The mining industry in Colorado today is on 
quite a different footing from that of 1876. Twen- 
ty-five years ago millions of dollars were allowed 
to go on to slag and tailing dumps. More recent 
metallurgy has shown how to secure some of these 
millions. But who is prepared to say that metal- 
lurgy has reached the limit of efficiency and econ- 
omy? In the training of mining engineers famil- 
liarity with the practical work as carried on in 
the Rocky Mountain region is so important that 
eastern schools send students across the continent 
to study mining and metallurgical practice here 
during vacations. 

Perhaps the greatest problem of the Rocky 
Mountain region is the redemption of the arid 
regions. The possibilities of irrigation are diffi- 
cult to over-rate. But to avoid mistakes we must 
have scientific, expert knowledge. The present 
leaders in irrigation have been trained mainly in 
the school of experience, but this has often proved 
a costly one for their employers. In the past, re- 
markable mistakes have been made. 

The writer has been informed that reservoirs 
have been built in soil that leaked like a sieve. 
Without consulting a trained engineer, large but 
ineffective outlays were then made to remedy the 
evil. The money wasted would have paid the salary 
of an expert engineer for several years. 

Twenty-two years ago, when the tribes of In- 
dians, known as the White River, Uncompahgre, 
and Southern Utes, were removed from Colorado 
to Utah, the land about Montrose, where the 
Indians had been^ was thrown open for settlement, 
and we are told that some settlers were greatly 
disturbed and hesitated to enter upon extended 
improvements, because some years previously a 
government commission had pronounced the soil 
of this region unpromising for cultivation. This 
belief was based on the presence of a white sub- 
stance, which covred part of the soil. Tbe com- 
mission believed this to be composed of alkalies. 
But later developments dissipated this fear. It 
was found that the dreaded white substance was 
not an alkali, but was gypsum. More careful ex- 
amination showed that the region possessed such 
excellent soil that the state of Colorado entered 
into a gigantic project to irrigate it. 

The state has now withdrawn from this enter- 
prise to let the United States government carry 



it on. This great project is to divert water from 
the Gunnison river, and deliver it through a tun- 
nel several miles long into the Uncompahgre val- 
ley, above Montrose. Thus the government now 
undertakes to supply irrigation, where at one 
time irrigation was thought to be useless. 

But we have not progressed so far that there is 
no danger of further mistakes. It is still possible 
to build canals which flood the fields in Septem- 
ber, but cannot supply the water needed in August. 
It is still possible to grow large potato vines 
but no potatoes. The problems of irrigation are 
exceedingly complex. They call for most diversi- 
fied knowledge. Not only is meteorological 
knowledge of different localities needed, telling 
us of the amount and time-distribution of precipi- 
tation, but care must be exercised in the preserva- 
tion of forests, and the location of canals and 
ditclif s ; in the careful determination of loss of 
water by seepage. The physical as well as chemi- 
cal properties of soils in different localities must 
be known, the habits and diseases of different 
plants must be studied. The wide field of bac- 
teriology enters into the problem. 

It must be borne in mind that our efforts need 
not be confined to the application of water to rich 
soil. Experiments indicate the possibility of ren- 
dering worthless lands productive. The redemp- 
tion of alkali lands is no idle dream. 

The character of these questions is such that 
they cannot be worked out by some one at a dis- 
tance as easily as by investigators who are on the 
ground. The soil conditions in one locality may 
call for the solution of a problem quite different 
from that which arises in other places. Research 
problems arise at almost every step. The greatest 
economy of efforts calls for able experts at almost 
every turn. In view of these facts, what vast pos- 
sibilities of usefulness are opened to an engineer- 
ing school of the highest rank ! What enterprise 
ever pointed to a greater need of trained special- 
ists of a high order? 

The Rocky Mountain region needs a great en- 
gineering school to train young men along the 
particular lines that will render them most effect- 
ive in the rapid development of its resources. — 
The Gazette and Telegraph. 



A TRIP TO THE VALE OF TEMPE. 



I dare not attempt any description of the Vale 
of Tempe. It is the gorge through which the 
Peneius river breaks its way from the flat plains 
of Thessaly to the Gulf of Salonica. On the north 
arises snow capped Olympus to the height of over 
nine thousand feet, and on the south the Ossa 
range reaching at points a height of four and six 
thousand feet. The gorge was famed throughout 
antiquity as the ideal of natural scenery and poets 
and writers vied with one another in extolling 
its wild charms. 



THE TIGER 



The sides of the gorge, which at times show 
a height of sheer rock fifteen hundred feet, are 
now far enough apart to allow broad meadows 
or dense groves along the river banks, and again 
they approach so close together that there is only 
room for the river and the road has to be chiseled 
out of the rocks at the side. 

of the Vale of Tempe till Sir Ashmede-Bartlett 
of the Vale o Tempe till Sir Ashmede-Bartlett 
suggested taking a trip to it. We were then with 
the central division of the Turkish army, after 
the unexpectedly rapid advance upon Larissa. We 
were waiting for the right and left wings to catch 
up before another step in advance could be under- 
taken. 

The suggestion seemed to promise more than a 
pleasant diversion from war duty because Hamdi 
Pasha's division, forming the extreme left of the 
Turkish army, had not yet been heard from and 
there was a good chance that by going in this 
northeasterly direction we might ind out its 
whereabouts and, as the French say, assist at its 
advance. Our party of seven turned out to be 
the capturers of the Vale. At the entrance of the 
gorge we found an inn kept by an Armenian who 
considered himself safe from the molestation of 
beligerents on either side. He told us that the 
Greeks had entirely deserted the neighborhood and 
that the bridge across the river about half way 
through the gorge had been destroyed so that 
Hamdi Pasha's division had probably gone back 
to the west. About a mile away on our right 
we could see standing out high and clear, a de- 
serted village, whence the last refugees had gone 
that very morning. We left our servants to pre- 
pare a meal against our return, and set out. 

The way proved longer than we had expected 
and we soon forgot all about the Greeks, till young 
Ellis, Sir Ashmede-Bartlett's son, and I, who had 
been racing our horses, and were far in the lead, 
suddenly came to the turn where the road to the 
bridge branched off. There, at the top of the 
steep bank, was quite a gathering of Greeks, who, 
as soon as they saw us began to shout and scatter. 
We were afraid that they would all be gone be- 
ore the rest of our party should come up, so I 
waved my handkerchief as a token of our peaceful 
intentions and we galloped up to them. An old 
woman, who knew some Turkish, met us crying 
and wringing her hands. We saw on the opposite 
bank an Evzone or volunteer soldier, rifle in hand, 
disappearing into the woods and another run 
lightly over the logs which they had tied together 
in lieu of the broken bridge. He, too, quickly 
disappeared into the woods on the other side. 

I kept waving my handkerchief to the rest 
while the old woman begged us, over and over 
again, to do them no injury. An old man soon 
joined us from the main group, who were now hud- 
dling together and looking at us in terror. They 
seemed to be all women and children. 



Their terror was increased by the appearance of 
the rest of our party and especially by the coming 
up of our two Turkish cavalrymen. We did our 
best to allay the fear of the refugees and to assure 
them that we intended no massacre. While we 
were questioning the old man and the old woman 
several more unarmed Greeks joined our group, 
one of whom had a tale of Turkish atrocities in 
a village far to the north; but the plundering and 
looting seemed to have been done by the Moslem 
population and no one had more than the vaguest 
hearsay knowledge about any army in that direc- 
tion. 

Looking down the main road from which we 
had branched off in coming to the broken bridge, 
we could see several herds of sheep being hurried 
along. So we set out after them, hoping to ob- 
tain from the shepherds some information that 
might be worked into war news ; for where were 
the Greek troops that might be expected to be in 
the vicinity? The shepherds started to run when 
they saw us coming. They quickly gave it up, 
however, and received us with sullen and even 
defiant looks. Those who were taking posses- 
sion of their vale were not, after all, such a large 
band. They received our assurances of friendly 
intentions with suspicion, a suspicion which we 
concluded afterward, may have been due to the 
fact that we all wore fezes. 

Because of the large number of Greeks that 
were about we deemed it prudent to retire with- 
out making further efforts to obtain copy. We 
"^ook a last look at the sea, where Sir Asnmede- 
Bartlett and his son were actually captured by the 
Greeks two weeks later, and started to retrace 
our steps. We saw none of our friends at the 
broken bridge, and realizing that some ambitious 
Evzone might try to take a shot at the hated fez 
from some point where the banks of the Peneius 
were narrow, we rode back rapidly and were re- 
lieved to reach the inn and dinner without further 
encounters. We heard two shots on the way, but 
they did not seem to be intended for us. 

Night was already falling when we left the 
gorge and came out upon the plain. From a vil- 
lage to the north we could hear shouts and cries, 
and looing of cattle, with now and then a shriek 
and when to all this was added a stray gunshot. 
Baron von Binderfinger, the Austrian correspond- 
ent, became convinced that the Turks were "loot- 
ing" the village. This was hardly possible, how- 
ever, as the Turkish army was too far away and 
the going to bed of an eastern farming village is a 
very noisy affair. A cow in looing for her calf 
will sometimes shriek just like a human being. 
Still we could not be sure about the sounds and 
we had seen enough that day to realize that war 
meant terror and anxiety and shelterless nights 
for many who were not fitted to endure hard- 
ship. — Carlctonia. 



THE TIGER. 



THE TIGER, 

Published weekly during the College year by 
The Tiger Publishing Co., in the interest of Colo- 
r'ado College. 

J. Y. Crothers Editor-in-Chief 

T. Hunter Assistant Editor-in-Chief 

J. 1. Muffley Athletic Editor 

Miriam Carpenter Literary Editor 

Mabel Barbee Alumni Editor 

A. H. Fisher Local Editor 

Bert Wasley Business Manager 

C. A. Hedblom Assistant Business Manager 

CORRESPONDENTS: 

Mr. Nash, Miss McDowell, Miss Isham, Miss 
Kidder, Mr. Lamb, Mr. Reeks, Miss Arbuckle. 

Subscription, $1.25 per year, payable in advance. 
Single copy, 5 cents. 

The Tiger is forwarded to all subscribers until 
ordered discontinued and all arrcaranges are paid. 

Students, Professors and Alumni are invited 
to contribute literary articles, personals and items. 
Contributions must be accompanied by the writer's 
name. 

Address all communications to The Tiger, 
Colorado College, Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Entered at the Postoffice at Colorado Springs, 
Colo., as second-class matter. 



Patronize Tiger Advertisers 



EDITORIAL 



THE STAG BLOW-OUT. 

'THE fellows had a very pleasant time in the 
Gym. last Friday evening, in spite of the chilli- 
ness of the atmosphere. The condition of the 
Gym. at that time warrants a slight dissertation on 
the subject of athletics in general in Colorado 
College. The College auhtorities make their strong 
plea in the east on the statement that students 
whose health will not permit them to study else- 
where can here pursue their education and at the 
same time regain their health. From this fact 
one would suppose that here, if anywhere, the 
health of the ordinary student would be looked 
after. The opposite, however, is the case. The 
Athletic Association spends what little money it 
does receive on the support of athletics which 
give exercise to the students who need least the 
encouragement to take exercise, and the skillful 
direction of that exercise. The movement at 
present in the larger and better colleges and uni- 



versities of the country is toward an athletic 
training for each student in the institution, with 
special view to the needs of each. At the same 
time they are not neglecting the development of 
teams which are to compete with other institutions. 
Amherst is a notable instance of a college which 
has required regular exercise of all students, with 
the result that in the Freshman class the average 
gain in weight per man was seven pounds, and 
the average gain in height one-eighth inch. Cor- 
nell is seeing to it this year that each man in the 
university engages in some kind of athletics. The 
University of Pennsylvania has recently built a 
Gymnasium costing over half a million dollars. 
It is time we were waking up to the fact that what 
is needed is a better development of the average 
man. He will be a better student for being in 
good physical condition. The fact that so few 
of our athletes stand at the head of their classes 
only goes to show that the colleges are using their 
athletes to win a reputation for the institution — 
using so much of their energy in this way that 
often they have little left for study, while the 
physical development of the scholars is being ne- 
glected. The latter often break down in a few 
years, and never regain the health they once en- 
joyed. One of the most serious needs of Colorado 
College at present is a good Gymnasium and a 
Physical Director with enough assistants to look 
after the physical development of the College men. 



Hurry Up, 



D LESSINGS on the advanced class in compo- 
tion ! Long and well may they write! The 
editor has been sighing for some literary material 
which was the product of our own students. As 
this was nowhere to be found, it was necessary 
to impose on the kindness of some of our ex- 
changes. With due apologies to them, we believe 
that there is talent in this College which could 
produce articles as well worth printing as these, 
if it were only developed by good practice. Too 
many of you are content to hide your lights under 
a pint measure. That is all that is necessary at 
present. Have enough pride in you to increase 
the size of your lamp till a bushel will be unable 
to cover it. There are still two months in which 
to compete for positions on next year's Tiger 
Board. Remember that since the adoption of the 
new constitution the election goes by merit. 



The Day of Prayer, 

T T HAS seemed advisable to the authorities to 
change the day of prayer for colleges from 
Thursday to Sunday. The change has not met 
the approval of the student body, as it deprives 
them of a holiday. In the institutions of higher 
education in the East it has been found better 



THE TIGER. 



to have the day of prayer on Sunday, and doubt- 
less it will be better here after we get over the 
shock of the change. Whatever may be your sen- 
timents on the subject of the change oi date, it 
should have no effect on your attendance at the 
meetings. The College needs a deep religious 
impression, which can come to it by the proper 
observance of this day. 



COLLEGE ORGANIZATIONS 

eontemporary Mask Ball. 

On Saturday evening, January 28, there will be a 
grand masquerade in the McGregor gym. under 
the auspices of the Contemporary Club. If you 
miss this, you will always regret it. Every col- 
lege girl should come, (admission only ten cents), 
and no college man should lose the opportunity 
to contribute to a worthy cause by buying a ticket 
which he may keep as a souvenir, simple but ele- 
gant, neat but not gaudy, of an occasion at which 
there is such general regret that he cannot be 
present. 

No one will be admitted who is not in costume 
or who is not masked. Punch will be on sale and 
there will be a cake walk of a high-class variety. 
It is rumored that there may be other specialties 
not yet announced. 

Come one, come all, ye Minervas ! Do as you 
have been done by. Ye Hypatians, do as ye 
zvould be done by, and get your ticket at once! 



Minerva (Sandy Sale a Big Success. 

Saturday's candy sale added another to the lojig 
list of successful accomplishments of the Minerva 
Society of Colorado College. The candy was of 
the best and the members realized a neat sum on 
their pledge of $200 toward the Athletic Asso- 
ciation debt. 

It is not known as yet how much was cleared, 
but the sum of $198 was taken in. 

Piano numbers were given by college girls and 
in the evening an orchestra composed of the 
Misses Johnson and Mr. Kier discoursed delight- 
ful piano and mandolin selections. Miss Lillian 
Johnson presided over the chafing dish at the 
demonstration table and deftly showed how a great 
variety of tempting candies are made. 

A large share of praise for the success is due 
to Miss Flosse Churchill, the enterprising presi- 
dent of Minerva. 

The members of the Society wish to acknowl- 
edge the substantial favors shown them by the 
Colorado Springs Furniture Company, the Knight- 
Campbell Music Company, Masi, Mueth, W. N. 
Burgess, C. Zittel, D. W. Smith, O. E. Hemen- 
way, the Broadmoor Floral Company, Crump's 
Greenhouses, the Perkins Crockery Company, the 
Colorado Springs Gas Company and others. 

Minerva wishes to express her especial grati- 
tude to the College people in general and to the 
miembers of Apollo and Pearsons in particular, for 
their loyal support and assistance in the unde'"- 
taking. 



CONTEMPORARY. 



HYPATIA NOTES. 



The Contemporary elections for next semester 
resulted as follows : 

President — Eaura Stiles. 

Vice-President — Irma Rudd. 

Secretary — Mabel Simington. 

Treasurer — Hannah Johnston. 

Factotum — Mary Porter. 

Next Friday the incoming and outgoing of- 
ficers will entertain the society. 



APOLLONIAN CLUB. 

PROGRAM JAN. 2/. 

Paper — Restriction of Immigration Cox 

Speech — The Monroe Doctrine *. . .Mosteller 

Socratic Debate— "Should Co-Education Be 

Abolished?" N. Vandemoer vs. Williams 

Paper — The Future of American Industry. . . . 

Leuchtenberg 

Speech— The Ballot and the Duties of Citizen- 
ship Lennox 

Impromptus. 



PROGRAM FOR JAN. 2/. 

"The Social Side of Russia and Japan." 
"Japanese Festivals and Customs". . .Miss Gilbert 
"Russian Festivals and Customs". .Miss Holcomb 
"A Glimpse of a Japanese Home" 

Miss Alice Meyers 

Hypatia has elected the following officers for 
this term : 

President, lone Montgomery. 

Vice-President, Clothilde Dubach. 

Secretary, Maude Stoddard. 

Treasurer, Irene Thomas. 

Censor, Bess McDowell. 

Attorney, Ruth Gilbert. 

Factotum, Emma Whiton. 



MINERVA. 



PROGRAM, JAN. 27. 

Richard III. and Henry VIII. 

"The Last Plantagenet and His Crimes" 

Miss Barbee 

"Queen Catherine, Henry and Wolsey" 

Miss Davis 



THE TIGER. 




These sunny, springlike days make the athletes' 
thoughts turn to track and field work. Colo- 
rado College has this year in its midst the best 
bunch of track material that has ever tried for 
places on a C. C. team. First of all, Painter will 
be here in a few weeks, strong and husky from the 
Independence mine, and ready and eager to cap- 
tain the track team. Painter should do some great 
work this year in the sprints and at pole-vaulting. 
There are two good half-milers in College this 
spring : Lamb of last year's team, and Paul Bur- 
gess, a freshman from Canon City High School. 

Willet, Darley and others will train for the mile 
run. Willet should do well this season for he 
showed improved form every week last year. In 
the sprints there will be sharp competition. 
Painter is a good man, as all know who saw him 
last year ; Seybold, the Park College athlete, is 
a sprinter of much ability, as is also Fawcett, 
another man from Park. Roy Mack, who did 
so well in the 220-yard dash, will be a valuable 
man. He is stronger and faster than ever. Love- 
well a freshman from Boston Tech., has had some 
track experience. Reeks, from North Denver, 
and Sill from the local High School, are also 
both promising men. Nead and Mosteller, the big 
football men, will be relied upon to do the work 
with the weights. Nead represented Colorado 



College during the last two years and Mosteller 
has had experience at Park and K. U. 

We have the material this year that with good 
training will make a splendid team. The track is 
in superb shape : solid, smooth, and wide — by far 
the best in Colorado. What the candidates must 
do now is to get busy. No team was made in a 
month, and least of all, a track team. Training 
should be begun at once. The days are lengthen- 
ing and the air is bracing. Just the time to and 
conditions to begin to train. 

BASEBALL. 

Baseball practice has begun. The squad is large 
and competition will be sharp. Hester and Mitch- 
ell work nicely together and C. C. is sure to have 
another famous battery. 



CLASS GAML. 

It is about time that the Freshman and Sopho- 
more classes elect their captains for the class 
teams. The game should be pulled off some time 
in February in order not to interfere with the 
practice of the 'varsity. Another reason for hold- 
ing the game at an early date is that in these 
games some good material is unearthed which 
the 'varsity captain can use to good advantage. 



TIGER WANT COLUMN. 

WANTED — To take in washing. Rates reason- 
able and satisfaction guaranteed. Albert Co- 
bert. 

WANTED — To know who chaperoned Jack Ma- 
Guire Monday night. 

FOR SALE— All the latest styles in dresses, milli- 
nery, etc., by The Rip Van Winkle Village 
Maidens. 

FOUND — On Monday afternoon, two wheel 
racks in front of Palmer Hall. 

FOUND— Late Saturday night, a Freshman un- 
able to find his way home. Sick from eating 
too much Minerva candy. 

LOST— My heart to Miss Jack Vories. 



LOST, ESTRAYED OR STOLEN— Some time 
between 7 and 10 p. m., Saturday night, at the 
Minerva Candy Sale, five dollars. 



LOST— Over in Old Town, one Freshman, brand- 
ed " '08" on the forehead ; bright green color, 
with white stocking on off-hind leg. Sixteen 
hands high. Weight about 150 pounds. Send all 
information to Harley Sill. 

WANTED — Any information as to the where- 
abouts of Mosteller all day Friday. 



LOST — Any stand-in I may have had with Miss 
Loomis. Albert Cobert. 



WANTED — To know where Himebaugh learned 
to make love. 



LOST— Monday night at the show, my modesty. 
Warren Currier. 



THE TIGER 



TIGER NOTES. 



"Minerva for sweetness!" 

Prof. DeWitt was too strenuous. 

Miss Sims has returned to school. 

Who says "Mr. Lyons needs exercise?" 

Who said Minerva couldn't raise $200. 

Where did Miss Rudd get all that candy? 

Miss McDowell had visitors here Saturday. 

Question: What constitutes a "knock"? 

A new role — Fitch as a charming cherub. 

Let her Rip Van Winkle ! And she ripped ! 

Exit Miss C . Great was the fall thereof. 

If at first you do not pass, flunk, flunk again. 

Mosteller was Smit(h)ten on Sunday night. 

Just think of the wise Minerva descending to 
"taffy" ! 

Rip may get half-shot, but Willett is full every 
Thursday. 

The McGregor committee is becoming more 
strict lately. 

One more groan from the girls. Gym. three 
times a week. 

Miss Agnes Smedley spent several days in Den- 
ver last week. 

Hedblom attended Rip on Monday night. He 
had a fine time. 

Translator — (German B.) — Poor is the man 
who has no lady friends. 

The death of Miss Eva Thompson's mother oc- 
curred Saturday morning. 

Remember to wear a carnation next Sunday in 
memory of Wm. McKinley. 

Miss Helen West was the guest of honor at a 
birthday spread, Friday night. 

Miss Frothingham has been enjoying(?) a 
week's stay in the Infirmary. 



Mrs. L. C. Stephenson, of Ft. Morgan, is visit- 
ing the Ft. Morgan students this week. 

Hypatia Society enjoyed a very delightful box 
party at Rip Van Winkle Monday evening. 

Miss Ruth Ragan entertained the Junior girls 
in McGregor at a chocolate party, Friday evening. 

Now start in and study for your next exams, 
the last of May. (Some of us have some earlier.) 

Misses Gordon and Gilbert entertained all the 
Hypatia girls on the campus at a spread Satur- 
day evening. 

All the girls are planning a gay time for the 
Contemporary mask ball next Saturday evening. 
Be sure to be there. 

The Seniors will soon entertain the campus girls 
with a high-class vaudeville, in which each Senior 
will do her special stunt. 

The new number of Colorado College Studies 
has arrived and is being prepared for the mail 
by the Librarian's assistants. 

Some of our boys are in the Inter-Association 
^^ M. C. A. meet next Saturday. It's at th- 
Temple Theatre afternoon and evening. 

The students decidedly disapprove of having 
Day of Prayer on Sunday and we fear the meet- 
ings will not be as well attended as usual. 

We are not adept in mind telegraphy, so please 
send in your Tiger Notes on paper — and sign 
your name. Fisher. 



Contemporary is to give a masque ball in Mc- 
Gregor gym., Saturday night, Jan. 20th. Be sure 
to buy your tickets early for the number is lim- 
ited. 

Some old roles — Palmer Hall as a cold storage 
plant; Patrick as a boy wonder; "Stuffy" as a dis- 
appointed lover, and Caj as an authority on 
"shpeed." 

Now that exams are over, you will have time 
to put the finishing touches to your write-up 
for the Nugget. Do it now. It will soon be 
too late to draw a prize. 

Saturday a crowd of girls took a tramp through 
Queen's Canon. Mr. Lyons chaperoned and all 
reported a very delightful trip. 
[IVhat became of the tramp?] 



IC 



THE TIGER. 



Rip Van Winkle. 

The Footlights Club gave a very successful pre- 
sentation of the comic opera Rip Van Winkle at 
the Opera House Monday night. The opera had 
many features different from last year's so that 
those who saw it for the second time were not 
wearied by the performance. The audience was 
amused while the curtain was down by an enter- 
taining side-show in the boxes ; they were in- 
formed that several of the members of the audi- 
ence "get there every time." It w^as quite evident 
they had gotten their once more. 

As usual, Rip and Gretchen were the life' of 
the play. Gretchen seemed to realize better than 
last year that she was somewhat of a shrew, and 
improved her work considerably. Mr. Cobert, in 
his new role as advertising agent of Colorado Col- 
lege, brought down the house. Mr. Hall, as Bur- 
gomaster, Mr. Bale, as inn-keeper, and Mr. Bor- 
tree, as schoolmaster, were favorites with the 
audience. To their song "It was the Dutch," they 
had to respond with several encores. 

The minor parts of the play, while not afford- 
ing an opportunity for a display of histrionic abil- 
ity, were well received. The music of the opera is 
decidedly catchy. It is admirably suited to the 
different situations. The fellows seemed to suffer 
at times from a stage fright, but rallied to their 
parts like men. Artistically and financially the 
play was a pleasing success. 



Good Work of an Rlumnus. 

P. ly. Gillett, '97, is the General Secretary of 
the Y. M. C. A. of Seoul, Korea. He reports 
that the Association work in Seoul is having re- 
markable success. The educated and most influ- 
euiial classes of the city are lending their hearty 
support and the rooms are crowded nearly every 
evening to their utmost capacity. An "English 
Llerary Club" has been organized among English- 
speaking members with some graduates of Ameri- 
can colleges as leaders. A Debating Club, a musi- 
cal organization and two lectures per week are 
some of the other attractions offered by this move- 
ment. An Educational Society, composed mostly 
of the members, is seeking to arouse the govern- 
ment and public opinion to the point of establish- 
ing a modern system of education throughout the 
land. The Association has a large opportunity in 
this country, which is just now getting such a 
thorough shaking-up by the war between Russia 
and Japan. 



Preliminary Inter^collcgiate Oratorical 
Contest. 

This evening occurs a very important event 
in oratory for Colorado College. For many years 
we have occupied a position in the state contests 
which did us no particular honor. It is time for 
a change. That change should come this^ year 
especially, because the state contest is to be held 
ill this city on the' 24th of next month. It is 
only by enthusiastic support that our speaker's can 
come off tirst. Of course you will be at the finals, 
but you should come to the preliminaries also, 
and support your man. The following is the pro- 
gram of the evening : 
I. 
2. 
3- 
4- 
5- 
6. 



Music. 

Harwood Fawcett — "The Reign of Law." 

James Finger — "The Yellow Peril." 

Mark Mohler- — ^"Warriors of Peace." 

Music. 

Martin Musser— "The Man of Destiny." 

7. Leo Lake — "Robert E. Lee." 

8. R. L. Givens — "The Keeping of the West." 

9. Music. 

Mr. DeWitt will preside. Music will be fur- 
nished by the Misses Johnson and by Mr. Doane. 



PROGRAM OF THE DAY OF PRAYER. 

JAN. 29, 1905, 

9 :oo a. m. — Meeting under auspices of Y. M. and 
Y. M. C. A.'s. -Ticknor Study. Pres- 
ident Slocum will lead. 

3 :30 p. m. — Class Prayer Meetings at places to be 

announced later. Watch the bulletin 
boards. 

4 :30 p. m. — Vesper Services, addressed by Dr. E. 

W. Work, of this city. 



PEARSONS. 



EXCHANGES 

"Herbie, it says here that another octogenarian's 
dead." 

"What's an octogenarian?" 

"Well, I don't quite know what they are, but 
tliey must be very sickly creatures. You never 
hear of them but they're dying." — Tid-Bits. ■ 

Jim— "I suppose you know that cigarettes are a 
slow poison?" 

Tim — "Sure ; I'm not looking for sudden death." 

"Were you at the show when they had the big 
dinner on the stage?" 
"Yes, I was the supe." 



On Friday evening will occur the inaugural ad- 
dress of the new president, L. S. Bale, and the 
exaugural address of the ex-president, M. C. Hall. 



It is rumored that the Harvard coaches kept 
something dark in the make-up of their team. — 
Yale Record. 



The fiGBR. 



1/ 



"That isn't a very hard cake m your pipe." 
"No; I sponged all the tobacco." 

"Hello, Jenkins ! Glad to see you're back from 
the front." 

"What? I know I'm thin, but I didn't know 
you could see my back from the front." — College 
Pays. 

A small boy was standing just outside his 
father's farmyard gate when a kind neighbor saw 
him and cried out : 

"Hello, my son, where's your father?" 
"He's in the pig pen," replied the youngster. 
"You'll know him ; he's got a hat on." 

"Here's where I win my see," said the freshman, 
as he climbed on the window ledge to watch the 
basketball game inside. 



"How long is your tour this year?' 
"Ten clean shirts." 



"Just see that soldier, he acts so drunk." 
"It's a case of military hops." 

Landlady — "The idea, Mr. Bings, of saying the 

room's cold ! We have steam heat in every room." 

Bings — "I think that steam's just a pipe dream." 

"Clarence isn't working very hard this year." 
"No, he's studying for a new profession — -line- 
man in a wireless telegraph company." 

"Brace up, old chap, something terrible has hap- 
pened. Your freshman room-mate has been killed 
in an automobile explosion." 

"And it was his week to get the mail, too !" 




Tt mill Pay Vou 

TO TAKE YOUR MEALS AT 

Cbe IttcRae gafe. 

OPEN NIGHT AND DAY. 

Dining Booths: Private Dining Room. 

Hall Entrance, 105-107 Pike's Peak Avenue. 




Get a Pi»actical Edti- 

cation at Henager's 

Business College 



nation course. 



109 N. TEJON 

New Students can enter at any 
time. Day md Night Sessions 

Positions Guaranteed 



We pledge oursetbes to get a good position 
for e'bery student that completes our Combi- 
'all at College office or address 



Phone Black 23 J 



J. C- HENAGER, 

President, 



/^ 



THB TIGBR. 



Only line 
running trains 

through 

Manitou and 

Victor en route 

to 
Cripple Creek 



NidldLiid Route 



CO UHEr 



Cripple Creek District 



50 

Miles 
Crowded 

with 

Matchless 

Scenery 



The Popular Through Line between Denver, Colorado Spring's, 
Pueblo and the Cripple Creek District. 



J. H. WATERS, 

Pres. and Gen'l Mgr. 



Cripple Creek, 
Colo. 



J. B. WIGGENHORN, 
G. P. A. 



College Pillow Tops for 
CKrlstme^s 

ASHFORD «l ROBERTS 

^yiri and *J^i at toner y Co. 

126 N. Tejon 

i5 per cent discount to students on fra.ming 



When in doubt, take the safe side. 
Send bundles to the 

eolorado Springs Laundry 



Est. 20 yrs. 



Ralph Rice, College Agt. 



Bookkeeping 
Shorthand 
Typewriting 



CENTRAL 

business Colle£^< 

L. A. ARNOLD, Pres. J. C. CROY, Prin. 

Nichols Block, 18 and 20 S. Tejon St., 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Rooms inviting, Work Thorough, Teachers up-to-date 



College Estab- 
lished in 
'^ Denver in 1887 



Call or Write for Information. 



C. W. WARSOP & CO., 2C«N.TelonSt. 

Draperies, Upholstery Goods, Furniture. Complete line of Screens, 
Pillows, Pillow Tops, Couch Covers, et^:. 



The 50-mile-an-hour Wheel 


THE CRESCENT 


Reading Standard Bicycles 

SUbhF & KI(i(iS Opposite Plaza Hotel 


BOWLING ALLEYS 

115-117 North Cascade Ave. 




Prof. Chas. J. Hausdorf, 

TEACHER OF MANDOLIN, GlITAR AND BANJO. 

Music furnished for weddings, receptions, enter- 
tainments, etc. 
Room 5, 10 1-2 E. Pike's Peak Ave. 


Telephone Mam 863 
E. S. SOLLENBERGER. Mgr. 

Private Alleys for Ladies 
Eight Alleys on one Floor 
Special Rates to Parties and Clubs 


FRANK F. CRIMP 

FLORIST 

Phone 500 509 E. Columbia St. 

Special attention given to Telephone Orders. 


H. E. BOATRIGHT 

^Public Sieno^rapAer 

33 GIDDINGS BLDG. 
Rates 5c per 100 words, 50c perhr. extra carbons 5c per pagre 



THE TIGER. 



IS 



WHEN IN NEED OF CLOTHING, HATS 
OR FURNISHINGS 

We would suggest that you consult your 

professor as to the best place lo go. 

We are willing to abide by their 

judgement as they all trade 

with us. We give spe- 

ial discount to students 

The B. W. DAVIS CLOTHING & FUR- 
NISHING CO., 102 N. Tejon St. 



The Willianison=Haffner 
Engraving Company 



1(133 Arapahoe Street 



DENVER 



2)r. 20. ^owiery 

DENTIST 



IS South TJeyon Si, 



G. W. Pauly, B. S., D. O. Mrs. Lona E. Pauly, B. S. D. O. 

Graduates of A. T. Still's College of Osteopathy, 

Kirksville,Mo. 

DR. & MRS. PAULY, ?I7s?c77nT 

Office, rooms 303-304 DeGraff Bldg. 118 N. Tejon St., Colo- 
rado Springs, Colo. Phones— Office Bed 1272 ; Res. Red 323 
Hours 8 to 12 a . m . , 1 to 5 p . m. 



F* H* Weeks 

26 East Bijou St. 

Photographs taken any hour 
of the day or evening by 
flashlight. Especially suit- 
able for groups. Call and see 
samples. 

Special Rates to Sti\dei\ts 



■^ ^^^ You are next to a good hair cut or shave when you patronize 

^^^*^i The Manhattan Barber Shop, J. R. WEYMAR, Prop. 3oe. bijou 



10 per ct. Discount 

On All Boots and Shoes 
To College Students....... 

(Ladies' Queen Quality excepted.; 

WHITAKER & GARDNER 

30 N. TEJON ST. 


„Jbr^lAUNDRv 


THE STAR is the leader for prompt 
and satisfactory service. 

SPECIAL RATES to students of col- 
lege and academy 

S. E. BENNETT, College Ag't. 


CHARLES P. BENNETT 

Real Estate, Loans 
and Insurancee^^ ^ 

NO. 5 PIKE'S PEAK AVENUE 


w. I. Lceas 

Columbia, Hartford, Rambler, Ideal & Tribune Bicycles 

The only first-class rei air shop in town. Chainless wheels 
a specialty. Wheels for rent. Phone 517- A. 1 29 N. Tejon 

Students wishing a Special Course in Drawing, 
Water Colors, Oil or Cliina Painting*; should call 
at Art Studio, io8 N. Tejon MARIE R. FORBISH, 
Member of Art Institute, Chicago. 



44 



Hart, SchafFner & Marx Clothing. 

Paragon" Trousers. *^?^^^ Hawes & Guyer Hats 



14 



THE TIGER 











Colorado College 






THE OLDEST INSTITUTION FOR 






HIGHER EDUCATION IN THE WEST 




FOUNDED AT COLORADO 




SPRINGS INI874 






Colorado College now offers advantages of the same 






grade as the best institutions. , 






For information concerning Courses of Study, Rooms 






and Board, Physical Culture, etc., apply to 






WM. F. SLOCUM, President, 






or EDWARD S. PARSONS, Dean. 






For information in regard to the College Department of 






Music, inquire of 






EDWARD S. PARSONS, Dean. 






Those wishing information as to the Courses in Drawing, 






Painting, Designing, etc., etc., inquire of 






EDWARD S. PARSONS, Dean. 






For information concerning the Engineering Depart- 






ment, apply to 






FLORIAN CAJORI, 






Dean of Engineering School. 




Cutler Academy 


Cutler Academy is the Associated Prepartory School of 




Colorado College, in which students are prepared for any 






American College. Address, 






M. C. GILE, Principal. 











THB TIGBR. 



15 



The Albert Sechrist Manufacturing Co. 

WILL INSTALL GAS and 



1033 16th 
Street 



* 



ELECTRIC FIXTURES 

in your residence at Colorado Springs 
same price as Denver, without extra 
charge. Call and select your fixtures, 
or will send you a catalogue. 



DENVLR, 
COLO. 





"THE LINE THAT SUITS THEM ALL." 

That the shortest, best and quickest line between Cripple Creek, Leadville, 
Aspen, Salt Lake and the West is Via 

The Colorado Midland Railway 

'It's the Midland Route that's Popular 

R. T. DUNAWAY, C. P. A., Colorado Springs. 
C. H. SPEERS, H. C. BUSH, 

Gen. Pass. Agent. Traffic Manager. 

810 17th Street, Denver. 



Our Microscopes, Microtomes, Laboratory Glass- ] 
ware^ Chemical Apparatus, Chemicals, Photo 
Lenses and Shutters, Field Glasses, Projection ! 
Apparatus, Photo-Micro Cameras are used by| 
the leading Lab- ^^^^^^ oratories and 
Gover'nt Dep'ts^^^H^ Round the World 



^6^ 



SCOPES 



Free 



Bausch & Lomb Opt. Co. 

5j Rochester, N. Y. 

New York Chicago Boston Frankfurt, G y 



ST. JOHN & BARNES 

Oldest and largest plumbing and heating 

tstablishment in city. Your 

patronage solicited 



Telephone 13 



206 N. Tejon St 



Coal $2.00 per ton. 
Txidor CoqlI Co., 



Cor. Cascade a^Ad Cucharras. 



Phone 
676-B 



^ "Wagon Load of ^ ^ 

New Wood Type 

Af^d Other Md^.terie^ls 

OfihcVery Latent at your 'DUpo^al_for 

Wirvdow Cacrds 
Tickets, Flyers etc 

B /f G 'RA V I J^ G — e" he Finest 

TKc Telegraph Job Rooms 119 e. p. p. Ave. 

Ask wKere TKe Tiger is Printed 



The ©Id 

Surio Store 

Wholesale and Retail 
Dealers in 

GENUINE INDIAN GOODS AND 
CURIOSITIES 

J. S. CANDELARIO, Prop, 

301 and 303 San Francisco Street, 

SANTA FE, N. M. 



Colorado School of Scientific Physical Culture. 

THOS. R. DALY. 410 Mining Exchange Building. PHONE RED 1821, 



i6 



THE TIGER. 



El Paso Cleaning & Tailoring C0> Pressing Dyeing Altering 

10 E. Kiowa St. Phone Main 667=A Colo. Springs Cleaning Repairing Tailoring 



The 



Hassell Iron Works Co. 



Founders and Machinists 



Office Phone 509-B 



Residence Phone Red S7 I 



DR. HARRY L. MOREHOUSE 

DENTIST 



Hours 9-12, 1:30-5 



First NdtM Bank BIdg., room S 



C. F. Arcularius & Co. 
niewelers 

Diamonds and Watches 

Fine Jewelry Manufacturing 

9 South Tejon St. Coiorado Springs 

The 

Crissey & Fowler Lumber 
Company 

Phone 101 117 to 123 West Vermijo Ave. 

Phone 540 

Monarch Hand 
Laundry 

42[ S. Tejon 

KARL L. MOHLER, Prop. 
W. J. WALLRICH, College Agt. 

WE uaUNDER aiVYTHING 

FINE CHOCOLATE BON BONS 



Name on every Piece 

Ice Cream, Hot and Cold 

Sodas 

Fresh Candies madeexery hour 



UNION ICE AND COAL COMPANY 

W. M. BANNING, Prop. 




Coal» mood and Tec 

Dealers in all kinds of Coal and Artificial and 
Natural Ice 

Yard Office, 105 W. Vermijo Ave. City Office, 5 N. Tejon 




JOHIN MOFFAT 

Tine Cailoring 

Repairing, Cleaning, Pressing. Special rates to 
College Students 

Over Waiting's Book Store 16 South Tejon St. 



Carriages, Cabs, 

'Busses, Baggage and 

Transfer Wagons 

Office, IS North eascade 



Denver Law School 

Law Department of the 
University of Denver 

Three years' course leading to the degree of 
Bachelor of Laws. Courses in Mining and Irri- 
gation Law. Full resident faculty. For informa- 
tion address 

LUCIUS W. HOYT, Dean 

Ernest & Cranmer BIdg., Denver, Colo. 

Did You Know 

That our stock of package crackers is so 
great in its variety that you could have a 
change for every day for more than two 
months and yet not exhaust our list? Well, 
it's a fact. We have a kind for every pos- 
sible time and occasion — and they are all 
good. Finest bakery goods in the city. 
Fancy Groceries 

W. N. BURGESS, \\2 N. Tejon St. 

Titsworth & Davidson 
DAIRY 

2 MILES S. E. OF CQLORADO SPRINGS. P. 0. BOX 6 

The Hottck-Davidson CoaJ and Transfer Co. 

Dealers In 

CANON CITY, MAITLAND 

AND LIGNITE COAL 

Phone 473-B. Office 118 N. Tejon. P. O. Box 257 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 



* 



4* Oi 



ee 






S6^ Gowdy-Sinnmoris Printing Conipany 

FOR WINDOW CARDS, TICKETS, ETC. ENGRAVED 
CARDS AND INVITATIONS ON SHORT NOTICE 



2/ Tforih 4* 
TJejon Si, 



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^ Phone Main 151 Established 1897 

♦ P> W> S MITH, 

4, FAMILY GROCER, TEA AND 

J COFFEE MERCHANT . : : : : 

. Orders Called for and Pramptly Delivered 

♦ 717 N. Weber St. Colorado Springs, Colo. 



THE DERN TEA AND COFFEE CO 

Dealers in TEAS, COFFEES, SPICES, 
EXTRACTS, BAKING POWDERS, Etc. 



Phone 575 



29 S. Tejon St. 



The People's Grocery and Matket 



PHONE MAIN 868 



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% S. JAMES & SON, Props. 

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222 EAST PIKE'S PEAK 



Colorado Springs, Colorado ♦ 



jiif* 



iPhotoffraphs 



at BINGHaM St WOOD'S. 18 S. Tejon 



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GREENHOUSES: Cor. Platte and Wasatch. 

J. B. Braidwood, 

SUCCESSOR TO WILLIAM CLARK, 



Florist. 



Established 1873. 



PHONE 28. 



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Geivuiive 
"Rockvale" 

CANOPf CITY COALr 

We are Sole ^yigeni^. 

Tbe Coloi'ado Spi'ings 



Thones 230—213 
'*Ai the ^ign of ihe 'Red Men" 




cAsk your dealer for 

VICTOR 

Athletic 
Supplies 
HELP THE TIGER 

by baying 

Scott Bicycle Tbes 

Write as if yoa cannot get them of 
yofir dealer. 

THE SCOTT SUPPLY & TOOL CO. 

DENVER, COIO. 



; USE ELECTRIC LIGHT 
♦ IN YOUR HOMES 

4» 



The Colorado Springs Electric Co. 



4>4>4>4>4>4i4>4>4i4>4>«4*4»4>4>4'4*4*4i4*4*4>4*^4*4*4>4>4>4*4i4>4>4i4>4*4i4»4>4>4*4»4*« 



4> 



lf4^'¥** *^^**'¥^4>^'¥i^^4f4i^* ********** ***^** 

* 

The Yo\in|» Neni^s Store* 4-^ 



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Sprttig Shirt Styles 

We are showing^ the New Fashions in Shirts for Spring. Our 
specialty is the EcHpse Shirt at $i.oo. The Patterns for this 
season are remarkably attractive and the qualities are excep- 
tionally good. 



SPECIAL DISCOUNT 
TO ALL STUDENTS 



HOLBROOK & PERKINS 



THE DENVER FIRE CLAY CO. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 
AND DEALERS IN 



* Chemical and Physicial Apparatus and Chemicals I 

* A 



A FULL LINE OF LABORATORY SUPPLIES AND ASSAY GOODS 
Write for Illustrated Catalogues 



1742-1746 Champa Street, 



DENVER, COLORADO 



A. H. WHAITE & COMPANY, 



* Men^s and Boys^ Outfitters. 

* 18 and 20 South Tcjon Street* 



* H. C. COLBURN, Pfcs. 



E. A. COLBURN, Jr., Scc'y and Treas. * 



The ^yinflerj: ^yixitomohtle Co. 



LIVERY, STORAGE, REPAIRING 



* JLrlVlLrl^r, dIiJKA.Ul!^, K.ILrfAIt<ir^lji ♦ 

* ♦ 

* Telephone Main 122 8-10 JV, JVeifada A-Oe. Colorado Springs, Colo, ^ 




O. E. HEMENWAY 



Groceries and Meats 



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J^*****4^******** ***************** ************* 



U5 South Tejon St. 
Colorado Springs, Colorado 




./ 



I l-a/- 



IH£ TIGER 




FEBRVARY 



VOl^JJME, VII. 



, 1905 

J^umber 18. 



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Special Rates to Students 

On Rented Pianos 




The KNIGHT - eHMPBELL 
Music (Company 



New Lennox Block 



C^pposite North Park 



St. John Bros.;''''''''''''''''' 

Gas and Steam Fitters 

Hot Water Heating a Specialty 

Prompt attention given to Repair Work. 

Curtis goal go. 

Office 132 N. Tejon St. Telephone 91. 

Try "NEW RANGE" for the Kitchen, $4.00. 
BiTUMNOUs Coal at Standard prices. 

SELDOMRIDGE BROTHERS, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

Flour, Feed, Grain, Hay and Seeds 

108 South Tejon Street 

REPAIRING WHILE YOU WAIT! 
Gents' Sewed Soles, 75c; with Heels, $1.00. 
Ladies' Sewed Soles, 65c; with Heels, 90c. 

ALI, WORK GUARANTEED AT 

The Lightning Shoe Shop 

2854 North Tejon Street. 

Visiting Cards in Latest Styles. 

WE SHOW gy advertising in THE TIGER that we 
1 01) ........... appreciate your custom. 

22 E. Kiowa St. The Prompt Printer j 



Elegant : 

PKninQ Artistic in Posing, J 
K iiuiuo Lighting and Finish ♦ 





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♦ DOVGLAS ea HETHSILINGTON 

* ^rchitect^s 

^ Phone 556-B Rooms 15-16 Outwest Building, Colorado Springs, Colo. ^ 

#i»4i4i4i4i««««4i4>4>*«4>«»4>4>4>«4>4k«4»4>4>4>««4>*4>4>#**4>«4>««4'4*7 



NEW : EMPIRE : THEATRE 

lOc VAUDEVILLE lOc 

3— SHOWS DAILY— 3 
i Matinee. 3 p. m. Evenings, 7:30 and 8:43. 



Discount to Students 

Phone 679-a 
Corner Cascade and Kiowa 



COLLEGE GOWNS, CAPS 

The Best Workmanship 
at Lowest Prices 

Silk Faculty Gowns and Hoods 

COX SONS & VININC 

262 Fourth Avenue., NEW YORK 



SKATES 

Hockey Sticks 

aniSWEHTERS 

Basket Ball and 
Y. M. e. H. Suits 

at Strangs 

119 Xorth Tejon Street 

Mueth's 

Soda, Ice eream 

eATERING 

CHAS. T. FERTIG 

9?ea/ Estate, Loans and Insurance 

29 N. Tejon Street 

Ijhe Colorado ^prin^s floral Co* 

FLORISTS 



/O'f 9^0rfA Z!»/am Sirmm* 



4* 

4> 

4i 
4* 
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4> 
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4* 
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4> 
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4> 
♦ 



THE TIGBR. 



Student's Book Store Books, stationery; air Engl- 

neer's Supplies; College Pins 



and Watch Fobs, 
and up. 



Century Fountain Pens $1 to $4, Waterman's $2.50 

REYER & PLATT. 

For $1 00 Oer month ' ^"'* sponged and Pressed each week 

—^ PANTATORIUM, 

17 East Bijou, Branch Office opp. Plaza Hotel. 



I 



THE COLORADO SPRINGS CO. 

The Original Locators of 

Colorado Springs and TTfanitou 

is still offering for sale choice 
lots on North Weber Street 
and North Wahsatch Avenue 

Also lots for sale in other parts of Colorado Springs 
and in Manitou 

Apply at ROOM 8, OUTWEST BUILDING 

L0UIS STOeK 

Office and Works, 13 E. Kiowa St. 

TELEPHONE 452- V 

Cleaning, Dyeiug, Scoaring in all its branches 

Ostrich Plumes Cleaned, Dyed and Curled 

K-id Gloves Dyed and Cleaned. 

GIDDINGS BROS. 

Fine Dress Goods and Ladies' 
Tailor Suits, Ladies' 
^ Furnishings 

Kiowa and Tejon Streets. 

We do Everything in the Tailoring 
Line 

J. B. CORRIN 

103 E. Bijou St, COLORADO SPRINGS, COLO. 

D. E. MONROE & CO. 
Prescriptton Druggist 

The best of Drugs, Stationery and Toilet Articles 

NO LIQUORS SOLD. 
eor. TeiOM Sf Bifou Pbowe 311 « 331 

THE HEFLEY-ARCILARIIS DRUG CO. 
Druggists 

Kodaks, Cameras and all kinds of Photographic 
Supplies. Developing and Printing for Amatuers. 
Free Delivery. 
Phone 144 21 South Tejon Street 



liardivare Bicycles 

H. S. BLflKE 

New Chainless Bicycle $35 and $20 

Rambler, Orient and National Automobiles 

Best Kepair Shop in city 107 n. Cejon 

I11r$. Y). R« 0rock$ 

Coilct Parlors at 20 East Hiowa 

Also Room 52, Antlers Hotel 

No Apprentices. Only experienced lielp employed. 
A COiVIPLETE ENCYCLOPEDIA OE AMATEUR SPORT 

SPALDINGS OFFICIAL ATHLETIC ALMANAC 

for 1905. Edited by J. E. Sullivan. 

(Chief of Department of Physical Culture, Louisiana 
Purchase Exi osition.) 
Should be read by every student, as it contains the re- 
cords of athle es and all amateu events in this country 
and abroad. It also contains a complete review of the 
Olympic Games from the official report of Director Sul- 
livan and a resume of the two days devoted to sports in 
which savages were the only contestants, in which it is 
proved conclusively that savages are not the born ath- 
letes we have heretofore supposed them to be. This is 
the first time in which the athletic performance of s v- 
ages have ever been systematically recorded. 

'Ihis is the largest Athletic Almanac ever published, 
containing 320 pages. Numerous illustrations of promi- 
nent athletics and trabk teams. 

RRICE, lO CEINXS 
For sale by all newsdealers and 
A. G. «PA.LDirNG & BROS. 
New York, Chicago. St. Luuis, Philadelphia, San Fran- 
cisco, Kansas City, Buffalo. Denver, Washington, Boston, 
Baltimore, Pittsburg, Minneapolis, New Orleans, Cin- 
cinnati, Syracuse, Montreal, Can., London, Eog. 
Send for a copy of Spalding's Athletic Goods 
Catalogue. It's free. 

HENRY TAMM 

Druggist 

PRESCRIPTIONS 
TOILET ARTICLES 
STATIONERY 

All Popular Drinks Served 
at our Soda Fountain 

Plaza Hotel, Cor. Cache la Poudre & Tejon Sts. 

THE RUGBY^RIMROSE COAL CO. 

All Kinds of Fuel 

Phone 481-A West 44-A 21 N. TEJON ST. 



H.KRHNZ 



P0ReBLHIN 

H. KRHNZ & 

Only 8 Chair Berber Shop in the City 

106^2 B. Pike's Peak Ave. 



F. R. SMITH 



BaTH TUBS 

e©., Barbers 

Try the I lectric Vibrdssage Machine 
eOLGRADO SPRINGS. e©L©. 



THE TIGER. 



DR.. SCHADT 

SPECIALTY "PRACTICE 

The Scientific Examination of your eyes and fitting of 
glasses. Special Discount to students. Consultation free. 
Office — 303 Colorado Bldg., corner Tejon and Huerfano Sts. 

Zehner Jewelry Co^^ 

26 Pikers Peak Avenue* 

CTI |r|F\IT^__- We have a fine assortment of goods 
OIULTLIHICJ on hand. CALL AND SEE THEM. 



We sell a GOOD FOUNTAIN PEN for $i 

WHITNEY & GRIMWOOD 

Opera House Building 

We are agentsfor WATERMAN'S IDEAL FOUNTAIN 
PENS. Prices from $2. 50 up. 



Watchmaker and Jeweler 

15 South Uejon St. 




lOOOWORTH 



z\ 



(oRracOLL^^, 



1739 Champa St., DENVER, COLO. 



•THE COLORADO ROAO. 







Come in and a^K. questions 



"Frenzied Finance" does not include invest- 
ments in Colorado & Southern Railwray tickets, 
but on the other hand you are certain of good 
returns, which are bound to please and satisfy 
you. • 



Avoid the last moment's worry, caused by pur- 
chasing; tickets at Depot, by coming- in at the New 
city office, No. 119 E. Pike's Peak, and let us fix 
you out the day before. Money back if ticket is 
not used. Remember that. 

J. H. Springer, 
Commercial Ag-ent. 



The 



Cfissey & Fowler Lumber 
Company 



Phone 101 



117 to 123 West Vermijo Ave. 




Carriages, Cabs, 

'Busses, Baggage and 

Transfer Wagons 

Office, 15 North (Cascade 



FRANK H. SMALL watches, Diamonds, fine Watch Work. Special 
Jeweler and Silversmith P^^^^e to Students. 113 Pike's Peak Ave. 



THE TIGER 



WHEN IN NEED OF CLOTHING, HATS 
OR riRNISHINGS 

We would suggest that you consult your 

professor as to the best place lo go. 

We are willing to abide by their 

judgement as they all trade 

with us. We give spe- 

ial discount to students 

The B. W. DAVIS CLOTHING & FUR- 
NISHING CO., 102 N. Tejon St. 



The Willianison=Haffner 
Engraving Company 



1633 Arapahoe Street 



DENVER 



7>r, To. Jow/er, 

DENTIST 



/S South TJejon St, 



G. W. Pauly, B. S., D. O. Mrs. Lona E. Pauly, B. S. D. O. 

Graduates of A. T. Still's College of Osteopathy, 

Kirksville, Mo. 



OSTEOPATHIC 
PHYSICIANS 



DR. & MRS. PAULY, 

Office, rooms 303-304 DeGraff Bldg. 118 N. Tejon St., Colo- 
rado Springs, Colo. Ph nes— Of f ice Ked 1272 ; Res. Eed 323 
Hours 8 to 12 a . m . , 1 to 5 p . m. 



F. H. Weeks 

26 East Bijou St. 

Photographs taken any hour 
of the day or evening by 
flashlight. Especially suit- 
able for groups. Call and see 
samples. 

Special Kates t9 Students 



next 



You are next to a good hair cut or shave when you patronize 



The Manhattan Barber Shop, J. R. WEYMAR, Prop. 3o e. bijou 



10 per ct. Discount 

On All Boots and Shoes 
To College Students 

(Ladies' Queen Quality excepted.^ 

WHITAKER & GARDNER 

30 N. TEJON ST. 


,^Aji:==^TAUNDF?v 


THE STAR is the leader for prompt 
and satisfactory service. 

SPECIAL RATES to students of col- 
lege and academy 

S. E. BENNETT, College Ag't. 


CHARLES P. BENNETT 

Real Estate, Loans 
and Insurance*^ .^ 

NO. 5 PIKE'S PEAK AVENUE 


w. I. Lueas 

Columbia, Hartford, Rambler, Ideal & Tribune Bicycles 

The only first-class re' air shop in town. Chainless wheels 
a specialty. Wheels for rent. Phone 517-A 1 29 N. Tejon 

Students wishing a Special Course in Drawing, 
Water Colors, Oil or China Painting^^ should call 
at Art Studio, io8 N. Tejon MARIE R. FORBUSH, 
Member of Art Institute, Chicago. 



44 



Hart, SchafFner & Marx Clothing. 

Paragon" Trousers. *^?^^^ Hawes & Guyer Hats. 



^^..ramsnm 



THE TIGER 



Only line 
running trains 

through 

Manitou and 

Victor en route 

to 
Cripple Creek 



NidlaLiid Route 

UO 1SHE, 

Cripple Creek District 



50 

Miles 
Crowded 

with 

Matchless 

Scenery 



The Popular Through Line between Denver, Colorado Springs, 
Pueblo and the Cripple Creek District. 



J. H. WATERS, 

Pres. and Gen'l Mgr., 



Cripple Creek, 
Colo. 



J. B. WIGGENHORN, 
G. P. A. 



Fablcy Bi»os. & Fabley, 

Ftirnitore, Carpets. Stoves, 

Tinware, China, Etc* 

23 South Tejon Street, 



When in doubt, take the safe side. 
Send bundles to the 

eolorado Springs Laundry 



Est. 20 yrs. 



Ralph Rice, College Agt. 



Bookkeeping 
Shorthand 
Typewriting 



CENTRAL 



College Estab- 
^^ XJ i i lished in 

JjusinessLoUeye '^^"^^'^ '" '®«^ 



L. A. ARNOLD, Pres. J. C. CROY, Prin. 

Nichols Block, 18 and 20 S. Tejon St., 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Rooms inviting, Work Thorough, Teachers up-to-date 

Call or Write for Information. 

C. W. WARSOP & CO., ^»"-T*"st 

Draperies, Upholstery Goods, Furniture. Complete line of Screens, 
Pillows, Pillow Tops, Couch Covers, etc. 



The 50-mile-an-hour Wheel 


THE CRESCENT 


Reading Standard Bicycles 


BOWLING ALLEYS 


SaEFF & KlfitiS Opposite Flaza Hotel 


115-117 North Cascade Ave. 




Prof. Chas. J. Hausdorf, 

TEACHER OE MANDOLIN, GlITAR AND BANJO. 

.Music furnished for weddings, receptions^ enter- 
tainments, etc. 
Room 5, 10 1-2 E. Pike's Peak Ave. 


Telephone Main 863 
E. S. SOLLENBERGER, Mgr. 

Private Alleys for Ladies 
Eight Alleys on one Floor 
Special Rates to Parties and Clubs 


FRANK F. CRIMP 

FLORIST 

Phone 500 509 E. Columbia St. 

Special attention given to Telephone Orders. 


H. E. BOATRIGHT 

Public Stenographer 

33 GIDDINGS BLDG. 
Rates 6c per 100 words, 50c perhr. extra carbons 5c per page 



t;he TIGCR 



Vol. VII. 



COLORADO COLLEGE. FEBRUARY 2, 1905. 



No. 18 



Advantages iot Stetlat Photograpky in Coloi^ado 

Professor Frank H* Loud 



Every one who is in the habit of studying the 
sky through the eyepiece of the telescope, attaches 
especial importance to that condition of the air 
which secures steadiness of stellar images, ar.d 
this has come to be called "good seeing." It is 
the contrary quality, too often prevailing in the 
air of nearly every part of the United States, 
which causes the stars to twinkle when seen 
with the naked eye, and which makes the field 
of view in the telescope appear to "boil," the 
images dancing capriciously about in a way most 
confusing to the vision of the baffled and tan- 
talized observer. Precisely how this unfortunate 
result is brought about is not perfectly known, but 
the fact pointed out by Professor W. H. Pick- 
ering, that tropical stations are more likely than 
others to be free from this defect, confirms the 
obvious view that it is in some way caused by 
that mingling of diverse atmospheric currents 
which accompanies cyclonic storms. If this view 
be correct, there is little doubt that diffeient 
parts of Colorado will be found to differ widely 
in the frequency of "good seeing." It may be 
anticipated that the northeasern portion will suf- 
fer from its proximity to the usual track of he 
cyclones, while the southwestern may approach 
the equability which Mr. Percival Lowell has 
found so greatly to his advantage in Arizoiri 
In no part is there reason to suppose that the 
"seeing'" will prove worse, even if so bad, as at 
the observatories, where, nevertheless, most im- 
portant work in the advancement of science has 
hitherto been performed — in New England and 
in the neighborhood of the Great Lakes. 

But the so-called "good seeing" is, after all, 
only one of the atmospheric qualities favonable 
to observation, and while to the visual obserx- 
er it may be of vital importance, the case 
is far otherwise when we regard it from the 
point of view of the photographer. And this is 
in reality the true point of view to estimate its 
importance to the progress of science, for the 
photographic camera, in recent years, and m.ore 
and more from year to year, has proved itself 
the most effective weapon of the astronomer. It 
has taken its place as the third member of a trio 
beside the telescope and the spectroscope, and is 
of equally indispensable utility as an adjunct 
to each of the other two. Now, although the 
leaps to right and left which are made by the 
image of a violently twinkling star, are doubt- 
less most bewildering to the eye, they are not of 



any great length, nor can they greatly disturb 
the long, steadfast gae of the patient camera. 
On the human retina, an impression lasts but the 
fraction of a second, but the photographic plate 
is able to accumulate, through an exposure of 
hours, the maximum effect of the rays which 
mark the central position of the stellar image. 
Hence "bad seeing" does not prevent good photo- 
graphic results. 

It may be supposed that, in proportion as the 
magnifying power of the instrument is increased, 
this indifference to the effect of "bad seeing" 
will be diminished. This is true as regards some 
species of work, but not all. To discuss the ques- 
tion in detail would be impossible in a popular 
article, but a single citation will suffice to show 
— and that on an unimpeachable authority — that 
there are fields of astronomical work, of the 
greatest importance to the science, and suited 
to the employment of the highest optical aid, in 
which, for substantially the same reason as al- 
ready indicated, the quality of steadiness is by 
no means indispensable. The authority meant is 
that of Professor Charles A. Young, who in his 
recent treatise, "A Manual of Astronomy," (1902) 
has occasion to contrast the performance of the 
spectroscope in its usual form — that in which the 
light is admitted through a narrow slit and falls 
ultimately upon a photographic plate — with a re- 
lated, but different instrument. Of the latter 
he says : 

"Moreover, it gives well-defined images onl> 
when the air is very steady and the star images 
quiescent — a condition of comparatively little im- 
portance with a slit spectroscope, since atmos- 
pheric disturbances, with such an instrument, do 
not affect the distinctness of the spectrum photo- 
graphed, but only make it necessary to give a 
longer exposure," 

Thus, to the photographer, length of exposure 
is the ultimate desideratum. And this considera- 
tion serves to equalize the advantages of different 
latitudes. For the longest attainable exposure 
is usually — though not inevitably — that which may 
be obtained in a single night. And if it should 
prove true, as Professor W. H. Pickering con- 
tends, that "good seeing" in its perfection is to 
be found within the tropics alone, it is incon- 
testable that longer nights are to be found else- 
where. 

Having considered, at greater length than per- 
haps is necessary, that condition of the air which 



THE TIGER 



secures steadiness of a telescopic image, it re- 
mains to notice other qualities, to the photog- 
rapher of paramount importance, especially trans- 
parency and the absence of clouds. The former 
determines the degree of effectivenss of an ex- 
posure while it lasts, the latter assures the pos- 
sibility of long continued exposures, which in 
regions of abundant cloud would be interrupted 
and abridged. Statistics of cloud-frequency, while 
usually found in meteorological compilations, are 
not completely satisfactory, for the reason that 
they must depend, not upon a continuous record, 
but upon estimates made at specified hours. A 
sunshine record, on the other hand, can be had 
continuously maintained through the daylight 
hours. The United States Weather Service pre- 
sents charts of the duration of sunshine in per- 
centages of the whole amount possible, and these 
appear periodically in the monthly weather re- 
view. The latest annual summary published, that 
for 1903, shows that in Colorado the sunshine 
frequency increases from somewhat under 60 per 
cent, in the northeast to more than 70 per cent, 
in the southwest. This, however, is not an en- 
tirely accurate index of the frequency of clear 
nights, since, the summer cloudiness, especially, 
has a marked diurnal period, the cumulus clouds 
of the afternoon entirely disappearing before 
night, while the hours between midnight and dawn 
are still less frequently clouded than those of the 
evening. 

Transparency of the air depends to a great 
degree upon elevation, and is a conspicuous qual- 
ity of the mountain atmosphere of Colorado. It 
is indicated by the visibility of distant objects 
and of stars when near the horizon, also by the 
white color of the moon at rising or setting, as 
distinguished from the yellow or reddish tinge 
which is commonly seen at points nearer sea- 
level. It is a quality, however, which is especially 
likely to be impaired by local conditions. Thus 
from Nob Hill in the evening one may often 
discern the summits of the Spanish Peaks at a 
distance of more than 100 miles, while on looking 
toward Colorado Springs, only two miles away, 
he sees the city immersed in a cloud of haze, the 
result of the smoke from hundreds of soft-coal 
fires. 

In conclusion, the superiority of Colorado's 
qualifications for the work proposed cannot be bet- 
ter summaried than in a letter written by Profes- 
sor E. C. Pickering, director of the Harvard col- 
lege observatory, known throughout the world as 
unexcelled in the practical efficiencmy with which 
he has built up, in all its departments the splendid 
structure of modern astronomy. He wrote, out- 
lining the plan which has since been carried into 
effect in the work in stellar photography lately 
begun at Nob Hill, as follows : 

"The air of Colorado is exceptionally clear and 
is therefore particularly adapted to certain depart- 
ments of astronomical research. The difference 



in the color of the sky and the whiteness of the 
moon is so marked, to a visitor from the East, 
as to attract immediate attention. There is rea- 
son to believe that in departments of astronomi- 
cal research, the difference in the results obtained 
will be even greater. In the greater part of 
Europe, and the Eastern portion of the United 
States, a limit is soon found in the length of ex- 
posure that can be used in photographing the stars. 
Owing to the haziness of the air, so much light 
is reflected by it, from the moon, electric lights, 
or other disturbing causes, that the photographic 
plate becomes fogged, so that the faintest stars 
fail to produce an effect upon the plate. On the 
other hand, in Colorado sites can be found where 
these effects are almost inappreciable, and it is 
believed that results could be obtained there, which 
w^ould be wholly beyond the reach of ordinary as- 
tronomical observations. In planning astronomi- 
cal work to be done in Colorado, it seems of es- 
pecial importance to avail oneself of these ad- 
vantages rather than to duplicate work already 
in progress at other observatories. A station 
possessing similar advantages has already been 
established by the Harvard college observatory 
at Arequipa, Peru. Much work has been done 
there on the southern stars, which, when extended 
to the northern stars, at existing observatories, 
does not give results of equal value, on account 
of the haziness of the air. A striking example 
of this kind is the work now obtained with small 
anastigmatic lenses. One of these instruments, 
having an aperture of one inch and focal length 
of thirteen inches, with exposures of one hour, 
photographs stars of about the twelfth magnitude. 
A large portion of the sky appears on each plate, 
and, using long exposures, the details in the struc- 
ture of the Milky Way, and therefore of the 
stellar universe, are strikingly depicted. 

"It seems, therefore, desirable that the instru- 
ment in use at Arequipa, Peru, should be dupli- 
cated at Colorado Springs, and similar work un- 
dertaken with it, each instrument photographing 
a portion of the sky, which would be below the 
horizon of the other." 

The plan outlined by Professor Pickering has 
been follwed with no substantial change, and 
though the attempt is still in its initial stage, 
the first fruits of its results point to the realiza- 
tion of his predictions of success. 



Eoreigner— "What is the significance- of the 
eagle on the American dollar?" 

U. S. Citizen— "It is the emblem of its swift 
i\\ght"—D('froit Free Press. 

"I hear they've gotten out a new revolver that 
shoots nine times without your taking your hand 
off the trigger." 

"Must be a bully thing to kill cats with." 



THE TIGER 



PRELIMINARY ORATORICAL CONTEST. 



The Oratorical Contest of last Thursday eve- 
ning, proved to be one of the features of the year 
1905. Six men who represented the oratorical 
ability of Colorado College, met upon the platform 
of Perkins Hall, to contest with one another in 
intellectual strength, as well as ease and graced 
delivery. 

The judges of the contest were Messrs. W. H. 
Spurgeon, R. L. Holland, and Rev. Jas. B. Gregg, 
and gave their decision as follows : Martin D. 
Musser, first; Mark Mohler, second, and Har- 
wood Fawcett, third. 

It was a good contest, and everyone who at- 
tended was pleased and went away determined 
to return to next year's contest and bring someone 
v/ith him. 

It might be well, however, for the help of those 
men who will go into the contest next year, and 
the two men who are to win the Intercollegiate 
Contest for Colorado College, to review in slight 
detail some of the work presented last Thursday 
evening. 

"The Man of Destiny," as delivered by Martin 
Musser, is a rattling good oration. Its points 
are clearly put and well developed. His principal 
work, however, will be on delivery. He does not 
lack enthusiasm and feeling, but he needs a keener 
interpretation of individual words and a freer 
range and better control of voice. 

Raymond L. Givens' oration on "The Keeping 
of the West," while original in conception, lacked 
spirit, both in composition and delivery. 

"The Character and Achievements of Robert 
E. lyce" were well developed by Leo C. Lake. 
But what Lake gained in thought and composi- 
tion, he lost in delivery. 

"Warriors of Peace," by Mark Mohler, has 
great possibilities. With more work on thought 
and style it will rank high as a college oration. 
He has a good voice and his delivery is easy and 
conversational. 

"The Reign of Law," by Howard Fawcett, at- 
tracted attention immediately for its choice of 
words and development of idea. The introduction, 
however, was so long that he left little time for 
the development of the real purpose of his ora- 
tion. His delivery could be greatly improved 
by more training. 

James H. Finger had a good oration on "The 
Yellow Peril," and one that appealed to the 
interest, but he lacked feeling for his subject. 

To speak in general terms, most of the orators 
did not evidence the long and continued train- 
ing on their orations, which would give ease and 
force to their delivery. That appears to be due 
to one mistake on our part. We depend too much 
upon one man. It is absolutely impossible for 
Mr. DeWitt to give all the men all the drilling 
they shoulud have on their productions. The 



Literary Societies put out the men and clann 
nuich of the honor of victory, and rightly so, but 
the Literary Society ^ould also claim the largest 
end of the drilling of its men. Let the men who 
know something about speaking come out and 
give two rehearsals to their fellow society man, 
while Mr. DeWitt gives one. The orator will 
then have more training. 

The Literary Society which should appeal to 
the new man is the Society that can show the 
most able men, and the most willing men to 
train its orators, debators, and declaimers to 
W-I-N. 

Few realize the work attached to the writing 
and delivery of an oration.. We encourage and 
praise our athletes, and indeed we should, and 
we need more of it. But few think of encouraging 
the orator or debator, or declaimer, who puts in 
hour after hour of hard work, all on the prep- 
aration of a composition which will be delivered 
in fifteen minutes. A college orator was asked 
how long he had spent in working on his oration 
that year. He replied : "About two hundred 
hours." This estimate was not exaggerated in 
the least. Think of what that means to a man 
in college, carrying his regular studies, and you 
will honor the men who entered the last con- 
test, whether they lost or won. 

Oratory in Colorado College stands where it 
never stood before. The College as a whole is 
taking a keener interest in public speaking. It is 
now ready to bound forward or become a dead 
issue. The fee of fifty cents to be paid by each 
student toward the Oratorical Fund will take the 
financial care and worry away, and with the best 
Professor of Oratory in the state, there should 
be no hindrance to our winnnig the Inter- State 
as well as Inter-Collegiate Contest. The spirit 
of the Freshmen in Dlacins three orators to rep- 
resent them in the local contest, bids well for the 
spirit of oratory for the next few years. 

Do not forget that the man who is to win the 
contest next year must begin work "at once." 
Pick your subject now and plug away at it until 
Jan. 26, 1906. 

For the present, let us lay aside all class and 
society feeling and stand by the two men who are 
to win for us the Inter-Collegiate Contest in Per- 
kins Hall, Feb. 24, 1905. Our representatives 
are capable and will win, if the student body 
stands by them. 



There was a young gent named "Chick," 
Whose face looked as if he was sick 

With a fever so high 

Pie would pretty near die: 
And all because she was so slick. 

— DoNTCHA Tell. 



THE TIGER. 



THE TlOE R. 

Published weekly during the College year by 
The Tiger Publishing Co., in the interest of Colo- 
rado College. 

J. Y. Crothers Editor-in-Chief 

T. Hunter Assistant Editor-in-Chief 

J. I. Muffley Athletic Editor 

Miriam Carpenter Literary Editor 

Mabel Barbee Alumni Editor 

A. H. Fisher Local Editor 

Bert Wasley Business Manager 

C. A. Hedblom Assistant Business Manager 

CORRESPONDENTS: 

Mr. Nash, Miss McDowell, Miss Isham, Miss 
Kidder, Mr. Lamb, Mr. Reeks, Miss Arbuckle. 

Subscription, $1.25 per year, payable in advance. 
Single copy, 5 cents. 

The Tiger is forwarded to all subscribers until 
ordered discontinued and all arrearanges are paid. 

Students, Professors and Alumni are invited 
to contribute literary articles, personals and items. 
Contributions must be accompanied by the writer's 
name. 

Address all communications to The Tiger, 
Colorado College, Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Entered at the Postoffice at Colorado Springs, 
Colo., as second-class matter. 



Patronize Tiger Advertisers 



EDITORIAL 



THE UNIVERSITY EXTEN- 
SION LECTURES. 

HTHE students of the College do not seem to 
have realized in the past the importance of 
the lectures in the University Extension course. 
Each student may pay some attention to the lec- 
tures which deal with the subjects in which he 
is especially interested, but you will not see him 
at any other. The fact is that he needs even 
more to attend lectures on subjects about which 
he knows practically nothing. The aim of some 
people seems to be to become as sharp as a needle, 
and the result is they are about as broad. Of 
course, the world needs needles, but there are 
many other implements of manufacture which 
are also necessary. After all, the simile is not 
a good one, for our faculties are to grow and 
become stronger and more useful as the years 
go by. Their food must be of more than one 
element if there is to be the proper development. 



To be specific, you should attend the lectures on 
"The Geology of the Pike's Peak Region" by Dr. 
Finlay. You may think you do not know or care 
much about geology, but there is a great deal 
that is intensely interesting and practical in its 
study. While the time spent at these lectures 
may not raise your grades in Latin or mathe- 
matics, they will add materially to your general 
culture, which is something as important. 



'TIS NO BLUFF. 

HTHAT Colorado College's claims to be an in- 
stitution of higher education are founded on 
fact is now recognized by the best educators in 
the country. No better proof of the fact can be 
cited than that Colorado College is one of the four 
institutions west of Nebraska and Kansas that 
has been granted a charter by the Phi Beta Kappa 
society. This fraternity exists for the purpose of 
encouraging the best scholarship and culture. The 
honor of membership in it is eagerly coveted by all 
undergraduates who understand at all what it 
means to wear the Phi Beta Kappa key. 

That honor is to be awarded soon to several 
members of the class of 1905. The charter of the 
local chapter would permit the election of one- 
fourth of the members of the class, but it has 
seemed best to be conservative at present, and but 
one-seventh of this year's class will receive the 
honor. The candidate must have a grade of over 
90 per cent in half of his studies since entering 
College. There will be more than the favored few 
who can fulfill these Conditions, but the others 
will have to be sorry they didn't work a little 
harder, or concentrate their energies more on their 
studies instead of their outside wQrk. 



There was a large audience to hear Prof. Fin- 
lay's first lecture on "The Geology of the Pike'o 
Peak Region," last Tuesday evening. It was 
necessary to adjourn to the large demonstration 
room in Palmer Hall and even this room was 
crowded. It seems probable that the other lec- 
tures of the series will have to be given in Per- 
kins. Prof. Finlay treated of the rocks of sedi- 
mentary origin from Manitou east to Autin Bluffs. 
He brought out clearly the contribution geology 
has made to the science of zoology. Come early 
next week and get a good seat. 



Some are born widows. 
Some achieve widowhood. 

Whilst others have widows thrust upon them. 
— Exchange. 

Wifie. — "Well, dear, I dreamt about a beautiful 
hat last night." 

Hubby. — "That's the first dream of a hat that 
didn't cost me money." 



THE TIGER. 



THE PHI BETA KAPPA SOCIETY IN THE WEST. 



It has been said that in the western third 
of the United States there are two states that have 
a distinctively superior population, drawn there in 
both cases by superiority of climate. These states 
are Colorado and California. In the other states 
of the far west the settlers came merely to take 
up land or enter into trade, while in California 
and Colorado a third, perhaps one-half of the pop- 
ulation came on account of the climate. Some 
were invalids when they first came, and others 
were seeking an ideal climate where they could 
escape from the rigors of a bleak eastern winter. 
Most of them were people of education and 
brought with them some wealth. For instance, it 
is probably true that in Colorado Springs there is 
a greater proportion of college graduates than in 
any other city in the country. 

To California went those who sought a mild, 
balmy climate, similar to that of Italy, while Col- 
orado attracted those in search of a cool, stimu- 
lating climate, with a maximum of sunshine and 
with dry aseptic air. Colorado is a large state, 
about as large as the kingdom of Italy, and it 
has many diversified interests. In its mining 
camps, high up among the mountains, the miners 
have at times been turbulent and disorderly; but 
in the rest of the state there is a population as 
orderly and law-abiding as any in the world. In 
the per capita expenditure of moneys for the main- 
tenance of public schools Colorado leads all other 
states, and no state in the Union has better schools. 

The fact that California and Colorado stand 
out alone among the states of the far west is il- 
lustrated by the Phi Beta Kappa society. The so- 
ciety, the oldest of all college fraternities, since it 
was founded in 1776 at William and Mary college, 
has come to be of purely literary and honorary 
character. Its object is the promotion of schol- 
arship and friendship among the students and 
graduates of American colleges, and its members 
are elected primarily from the best scholars of 
the graduating classes. There is probably no 
honor more coveted by undergraduates than the 
privih^ge of wearing a Phi Beta Kappa key. The 
central organization of the society grants new 
charters only after the most careful study of the 
institutions that apply. In order to receive a 
chartci an mstitution must give evidence that it 
does work of a high standard, that it has a good 
faculty and satisfactory library and laboratory 
facilities — in a word, that its graduates are worthy 
of wearing the society's badge. In the western 
third of this country, that is, west of Nebraska 
and Kansas, only four institutions of learning 
have as yet succeeded in securing charters of the 
Phi Beta Kappa society, and these are Colorado 
College and the University of Colorado in Colo- 



rado, and the University of California and the 
Leland Stanford Jr., University in California. 

It will be noted that two of these are state ni- 
stitutions and two are privatelv endowed. All 
four are doing excellent work, but the character 
of the work differs considerably. The state insti- 
tutions offer a wider range of courses, in order to 
meet, as far as possible, the demands of the people ; 
while the private institutions concentrate tlieir 
work more and aim to do intensive rather than 
extensive work. Colorado College has the distinc- 
tion of being the only "college", that is, the only 
institution without schools of law and medicine, 
that has received a charter in the society west of 
Indiana. It has not the endowment of Stanford, 
in fact, its work is hampered by lack of funds, 
but the endowment will come in time. Colorado 
and California are great states and both have rea- 
son to be proud of their educational advantages. 
And it is well that each state has two institutions 
of higher learning, so that rivalry may stimulate 
to even better work. 



DR. WORK'S ADDRESS. 

Today our prayer for colleges is not for ma- 
terial things, but for the hearts and minds of the 
young men and women working here. Let us, 
today, put the whole leverage of our prayers for 
the college youth of our land. 

The very essence of life is invisible. We live 
in a world of materialism. The college, more 
than any other institution, is anti-materialistic. 
Education is engaged in a search after an in- 
sight into the hidden meaning of life. How much 
of an outlook then does a college represent? 
It represents, for the student, an outlook upon 
himself, upon the world, and upon God. A stu- 
dent's life will be wasted, till his eyes are opened 
and he sees the meaning of this opportunity. May 
one centre of our prayer be that this meaning 
will be revealed to him. 

The best part of a man's occupation is the in- 
visible part. Occupation is the employment of 
life. So may our students see that in whatever 
occupation they choose the most important thing 
is the interpretation of our life. Young man, 
religion is ever seeking after those finished prod- 
ucts of your life that blossom out into character. 

Let the third centre of our prayer be the claim 
of religion upon the educated mind. Today the 
swing of the pendulum is beginning to turn back 
again from materialism and towards God. My 
prayer for the students of Colorado College this 
afternoon is that they may see that an educated 
mind is not really educated till it hearkens to 
the call of God. 



IC 



THE TIGER 




THE TIGBR. 



ti 



College Organisations 



APOLLONIAN CLUB— FEB. 3, 1905. 

CAPTAINS OF INDUSTRY. 

Rockefeller Fawcett 

Carnegie McLean 

Morgan . R. Morgan 

Gould Steffa 

Music Mandolin Club 

Debate : — Resolved, That intense competition has 

been the greatest causes of the decline in the 

standard of business. 

Affirmative Smith, Seybold 

Negative Fisk, Redding 



MINERVA— FEB. 3. 

Minor Groups in Shakespeare. 

The Comrades of Falstaff Miss Smith 

Bottom and His Crew Miss Armstrong 

Dogberry and Nerges Miss B runner 

Minerva's officers for this semester are : 

Miss Churchill, President. 

Miss Spalding, Vice-President. 

Miss Leidigh, Secretary, 

Miss Ragan, Treasurer. 

Miss Frost, Factotum. 



PEARSONS PROGRAM— FEB. 3, 1905. 

Paper — "Men Who Are Making History Today 

in Russia Cobert 

Open Debate — "Resolved, That an Autocratic 

Form of Government Is Necessary to the 

Welfare of the Russian People." 

Affirmative : M. C. Hall, Bortree. 
Negative : Givens, Hedblom. 

Current Events Reyer 

Historical Sketch — "The Romanoff Dynasty".. 

Willis 

Music String Trio 



CONTEMPORARY CLUB. 

The Mask Ball, postponed on account of the 
Day of Prayer, will be held in McGregor Gym. 
on Saturday, Feb. 4, at half past seven. If you 
don't want to dance, come and look on. It will 
be a very festive occasion and no one can afford 
to miss it ! 



CONTEMPORARY CLUB. 

Last Friday the club met for the first time in 
Pearsons Club House. The officers of the club 
entertained the society with a short program in 
the auditorium, at which Miss Rudd read from 
"Memoirs of a Baby." The society then adjourned 
to the reception room, where chocolate was served. 



CONTEMPORARY. 

The work for the next semester will be on 
Russia, following the last program on Japan. 

The program for Feb. 3 will be: 

Outline of the Semester's Work Miss Rudd 

The Land of the Czar Miss Scott 

The Russian Peoples Miss Porter 



HYPATIA. 



Program for Feb. 3 : 
Quotations on Art — 

I. Russian Artists and Their Work 

Miss Smith 

2 .Japanese Painting and Color-Printing. . . 

Miss Taylor 



Y. W. C. A. 



Mrs. Slocum spoke to the girls on the mean- 
mg of the Day of Prayer. She said it should 
bring about a deepening of the religious life, 
for although no one wishes to be irreligious, still 
there are many who are religious merely in a 
conventional manner. 

To know that the heart is bound to God in- 
volves the fact that we must have Christian love 
in our hearts and choose the highest. Not to 
cherish petty ideals of our own, but work with 
God. 

The Christian should strive to feel as Christ 
did towards his fellowmen, and in order to do 
that, should realize the privilege of sonship to 
God. 



TIGER WANT ADS. 

V/ANTED — A soprano voice to answer to my 
name at roll call. L. S. B. 

WANTED — 50 cents from each student, to meet 
necessary expenses. — Oratorical Association. 

FOR SALE— Tickets to the Contemporary Mask 
Ball, IOC. 

LOST — Myself in the maze of the schedule. 
Anyone finding me please return to owner and 
receive reward. 

MONEY WANTED— By Y. M. C. A., the Ath- 
letic Association, and everybody. 

WANTED— Copy for the Annual. Must have 
good references. Tiger ditto. 

WANTED — To know how we are going to get 
in 395 days of sunshine this year. 



iJ 



THB TIGBR. 



TIGER NOTES 



Get a mask and come ! 

The Soph. Baseball team will be captained by 
Leuchtenberg and managed by McClintock. 

A large number of students took advantage of 
the liberal rates and saw "As You Like It" Mon- 
day night. 

The meeting of Contemporary Friday afternoon 
was in charge of the incoming and outgoing of- 
ficers. After a short program the Society ad- 
journed for an informal reception and an explora- 
tion of their new quarters, the Pearsons Club 
House. Delicious refreshments were served and 
everyone reported a most delightful afternoon. 

Don't forget the Mask Ball Saturday night ! 

Mystery ! What are the Freshman girls plan- 
ning to do next Friday night? 

Have you bought your tickets for the Mask 
Ball? 

No more cuts in German A or B. 

Don't forget that story you are going to write 
for the Annual ! 

Misses Stoddard and McCreery were honored 
by a "Dutch lunch" Saturday night. 

Miss Johnston has recovered from a brief ill- 
ness. 

In French, Miss R. translating — "One should 
never blush to leave his arms." 

The Sophomore prayer meeting was well at- 
tended and very helpful. Mr. Hedblom led, tak- 
ing as his subject, "The Value of a High Ideal 
in College Life." 

Prof. Birchby has given the girls the privilege 
of sitting in the back seats. 

Alva W. Henderson, '08, has left school to 
work on the Gazette. 

Don't miss the Mask Ball. 

The Freshmen are getting busy in athletics. 
Tyler was elected baseball captain and Blunt for 
manager. Reeks was elected captain and man- 
ager of the track team. Get busy, fellows, and 
— Sophomores. 



Miss Parsons and Miss Clark entertained at a 
chafing dish party Saturday night, in honor of 
their guest, Miss Whipple, of Canon City. 

Fisher, Anderson and Reeks were on the local 
Y. M. C. A. team that took first place in the state 
meet. 

Join the Cross-Country Club and start training. 

The v^esper service was well attended. 

There was a good audience at the Oratorical 
Contest, but there were four town people to one 
person from the College. Why is it that out- 
siders appreciate our shows more than we do 
ourselves? 

Prexy says some one touched him very deeply. 
That's all right ; turn about is fair play ; he's 
been touching prosperous gentlemen deeply for a 
good many years. 

The Colorado College Calendar might remark 
that all Tiger copy should be in Tuesday morning 
at 10, and as much as possible by Monday noon. 

Mrs. Boarding House — "To eat eggs when they 
cost three cents a piece makes you feel that you 
are swallowing money." 

Star Boarder — "Yes, sometimes you do think 
you are swallowing (s)cents." 

See how many people you can fool with an 
original costume and mask ! 

The Middlesworth boys were obliged to be 
absent for a short time on account of their father's 
illness. 

A Valentine party will allow the Sophs to for- 
get their troubles for one night — Feb. 14. 

Track athletics next"! Nuf said ! 

Baseball, too ! Means you ! 

We're glad to see Mitchell roaming 'round the 
campus once more. 

Assaying is now going "full blast." 



"The papers say that coats will be worn longer 
than ever." 

"I'm right in style then, this is the third year 
for mine." 



The fiGHR 



iS 



ALUMNI NOTES 

The. many friends of Colorado College will be 
grieved to hear of the serious illness of the 
Alnmni Association. Its physicians, the editor 
and alumni editor of the Tiger, have done all 
in their power to prevent the worst, but their 
efforts seem to have been in vain. It seems a 
pity that one so young should be thus stricken 
and a future that seemed so bright should be 
darkened by the shadow of disease. But, as 
Homer says — or was it Byron? — "Let us hope for 
the best." 



"Jonny" Bui 
once more. 



ex-'o4, has started into College 



Fairfield Sylvester, '04, was around the campus 
last week. 



Word has reached the city of the death of the 
father of Miss Flora McGee, '04. 

Lester McLean, '99, has accepted the secretary- 
ship of the city Y. M. C. A. of Colorado Springs, 
and will enter upon his duties immediately. Mr. 
McLean has been engaged by the Student De- 
partment of the International Committee of the 
Y. M. C. A., but has been released by them in 
order to take up his work in this city. The local 
Association is one of the most prosperous in the 
country, with about 1,000 members and a splendid 
building owned by the Association. 




ACADEMY DEPARTMENT 



TT IS time some of the better students of the 
Academy were waking up to the real situation 
that presents itself to them. It is in their hands 
in a large measure, to keep the standard of the 
Academy as high as it has been in the past. Per- 
haps some of the present students do not know 
what this standard has been. The following inci- 
dent should be sufficient proof of Cutler's high 
standing : Some time ago Gov. Alva Adams wrote 
to the faculty of Yale University, asking them 
to give him a list of the best half-dozen prepara- 
tory schools in the United States. Among the 
number recommended by Yale's faculty were Phil- 
lips Exeter and Andover Academies, Lawrenceville 
and Cutler. Their estimate was based not only 
on the excellent faculty and facilities in labora- 
tories, etc., offered by Cutler, but upon the splen- 
did record of some of Cutler's graduates in higher 
institutions of learning, and the evidence of the 
work being done by the Academy students them- 
selves. The faculty of the Academy is as good 
now as it was years ago, for it is a well-known 
fact that earnest pupils often make better progress 



under a growing teacher than under one who 
knows his subject so well he has lost the point of 
view of the beginner. So far as buildings and 
laboratories are concerned, the Academy students 
enjoy really better opportunities than were of- 
fered the College students when the writer first 
saw Colorado College, some six years ago. Their 
laboratories are the same, but they are much less 
crowded than they were formerly. At that date 
preparatory students were not barred from inter- 
collegiate athletics, so that the Academy could 
not develop an athletic spirit distinctly its own. 
It was well that it was so at the time, but now 
both College and Academy are large and strong 
enough to stand on their own feet without 
crutches. 

The literary life of the Academy, on the other 
hand, was separate from that of the college. The 
Hesperian Society was the organ through which 
the Academy gained a name throughout the state, 
and even farther. "There were giants in those 
days," considering their years. At one time, be- 
ing unable to find any other preparatory school 



H 



THH TIGHR. 



willing to debate with them, the Hesperians held 
a prize debate among their own members. That 
this spirit accomplishes great things is shown by 
the fact that on the following year, when the 
Academy did get two debates with outside 
schools, the Hesperians won them both. It is 
such spirit as this that the Alumni of Cutler would 
like to see in the old school again. It is a good 
thing to win a championship in base-ball, and a 
good thing to hold it, but Cutler is not an Ath- 
letic Club. The literary life of the students must 
be looked after as well, if Cutler is to remain 
one of the first preparatory schools of the country. 
Your literary societies are a great factor in 
this development, but they are not all that is 
necessary. It is a great advantage to a young 
writer to see something of his own composition 
in print. Somehow the cold type seems to bring 
out flaws that were not noticed before. Sentences 
seem involved and hazy that were perfectly distinct 
to the writer when he wrote them. It is the 



office of the High School paper to correct the 
style of its budding authors as much as to offer 
an outlet for bursting enthusiasm. At present 
it does not seem feasible for the Academy to have 
an entire paper of its own, but the Tiger offers 
its columns to the' Tiger "cubs" in lieu of such a 
periodical. The editor of the Academy Depart- 
ment has done his work conscientiously in the 
face of many unpleasantnesses, but he cannot give 
his whole time to the paper. He should have the 
hearty support of every student in the Academy. 
Cads, we can rely on you to show the High 
Schools of the state that you amount to something 
in baseball and track athletics, but it w^ould be 
cruel to spring too great a surprise on them in 
the State Inter-Scholastic Meet in Boulder. Let 
them know before hand there is a preparatory 
school in the City of Sunshine that is the real 
thing in every activity into which such schools 
enter. C. A., 'oo. 




Man — (Meeting boy on street) : Why are 
you out of school? 

Boy — On account of sickness. 
Man — Who is sick? 
Boy — Truant officer. 

The monkey lost his hold and fell into the croc- 
odile's waiting jaws. Even then his wits did not 
desert him. "I just dropped in for dinner," he 
said, with an engaging smile. — Exchange. 

Dan Cupid is a marksman poor. 
Despite his love and kisses — 

For while he always hits the mark 
He's always making Mrs. 



We note that some of our students are follow^- 
ing the rule so common to the college students, 
viz. : Cram^ Exam, Flunk, Trunk. — Bx. 

Sing a song of foot-ball. 
Don't it make you smile? 
Two and twenty players 
Struggling in a pile : 
When the pile is opened 
Hear those awful groans. 
Boys begin to creep out. 
Looking for their bones. 
Sections there of noses. 
Patches here of hair, 
But they made a touchdown 
And little do they care. 



THE TIGER 



rs 



REALLY THEY DON'T. 

If some city friends invite you 
To meet their pas and mamas, 

And bid you wear your evening clothes, 
They don't mean pink pajamas. 



EPITAPH. 



Within this grave, a porter lies, 

Who in a Pulhnan waited. 
He swallowed cinders till his lungs 

Became contaminated. 
Before he died, the doctors tried 

To solve this inward muddle, 
And quickly diagnosed the case 

As "Pullmanary trouble." 

— Yale Record. 



Son — "Pa, what's the law of gravitation?" 
Pa — "I ain't got the time to keep up in the pro- 
ceedin's of our gosh darn legislatur'." 



PLAUSIBLE THEORY. 

"I think I'll try filling the tires of my automo- 
bile with illuminating gas," said the amateur 
chauffeur. 

"Good joke," gurgled his fool friend. "Ex- 
pect to make it light. Ha, ha !" 

"Nothing of the kind," rejoined the amateur 
chauffeur. "I thought it might increase the speed 
of the machine. Just think how the stuff makes 
the wheels of a gas-meter spin around." — Colum- 
bus Dispatch. 



"Your German pronunciation has shown a 
marked improvement during the past week." 
"Yes, sir; I caught this cold just a week ago." 



In buying shoes you will always find the latest 
at the most reasonable prices at Handy's Shoe 
Store, ii8 S. Tejon. Their Semi-Annual Clear- 
ance Sale is now in progress. 



Prof. "Have you been through Calculus?" Students, if in need of glasses or repairs on 

New Student. — "No, not unless I came through same, see Ashby, the Optical Jeweler, the oldest 

it on the way up here; I came from Missouri established in the county. You will find every- 

and was asleep part of the time." — Exchange. thing right. 



PIERCE 



FREE 



INDIANS 



New '05^ Cycle Given Away July 1st. 

Every Cash Customer Gets a Coupon, 

THE BEST EQUIPPED REPAIR SHOP IN THE CITY. 

Waverley Cycle Co* 



Telephone 6703 your order and 
we will call for and deliver. 



200 IN. Tejon, 



OUR LINE OF 



House rurnishings 

IS COMPLETE. 

The John T. Clough Mercantile Co., 

110 S. Tejon St. 

THE PARK BAKERY 
RESTAURANT, 

214 N. Tejon Street. 



Honeyman & Auld, 
Contractors and Painters, 

218 North Corona Street- 
Phone 811-B. 

Chamber's Dancing Academy. 

Phy.ical Culture, Dancing and Deportment. 
All kinds of Fancy, Stage and Ball Room Dances taught. 
Member of International Association Masters of Dancing. 
Adult class every Monday night. 

L. D. CHAMBERS, 



Woodmen's Hall. 



No. 9 East Bijou. 



i6 



THE TIGBR. 











Colorado College 






THE OLDEST INSTITUTION FOR 






HIGHER EDUCATION IN THE WEST 




FOUNDED AT COLORADO 




SPRINGS IN 1874 






Colorado College now offers * advantages of the same 






grade as the best institutions. 






For information concerning Courses of Study, Rooms 






and Board, Physical Culture, etc., apply to 






WM. F. SLOCUM, President, 






or EDWARD S. PARSONS, Dean. 






For information in regard to the College Department of 






Music, inquire of 






EDWARD S. PARSONS, Dean. 






Those wishing information as to the Courses in Drawing, 






Painting, Designing, etc., etc., inquire of 


, 




EDWARD S. PARSONS, Dean. 






For information concerning the Engineering Depart- 


1 




ment, apply to 






FLORIAN CAJORI, 






Dean cf Engineering School. 




Cutler Academy 


Cutler Academy is the Associated Prepartory School of 




Colorado College, in which students are prepared for any 






American College. Address, 






M. C. GILE, Principal. 




• 







THE TIGER. 



17 




WHY DO I LrOOK SO WE:LLr ? 

I have; been to 

MRS. CROOK'S, at 20 E. Kiowa St., 

THIS MORTVIIVa. 

A full line of Toilet Articles, Hair Goods, Fancy Combs, Etc, 



IS THE TIG BR 



The El Paso Ice and Coal Co« 

AND 

The Oampton-Gambrill Fttel Co., 

Office 29 N. Tejon Street. COLORADO SPRINGS, COLO. 



MANiFACTiRERS or TELEPHONES ^^^^ A W 

PURE ICE. Main 46 and 417b COALf. 



**I^h(^ Wl^ttl^** LARGE SAMPLE ROOMS. 

I The most modern Table and 

Leading Commercial and Tourist Hotel of m i^ ■ ,, i , 

Colorado Springs, Colorado. I Service the Very best. 



ttEO.S.ELSTUN,Prop. H. P. KNIfiBT, Manager. GOLF PRIVILEGES. 



H. C. COLBURN, Pres. E. A. COLBURN, Jr., Sec'y and Treas. 

The ^ytnfler^- ^yitxiomobile Co. 

LIVER. Y, STORAGE. REPAIRING 

Telephone Main 122 S-IO J^, J^e-Vada AnJe. Colorado Springs, Colo, 



THE DENVER EIRE CLAY CO. 

MANIFACTLRLRS OF 
AND DEALERS IN 

Chemical and Physical Apparatus and Chemicals 

A FILL LINE OF LABORATORY SUPPLIES AND ASSAY GOODS. 
Write for Illustrated Catalogues. 

1742-1746 Champa Street, DENVER, COLORADO. 



THE TIGER 



19 



The Albert Sechrist Manufacturing Co. 

WILL INSTALL GAS and 



1033 16th 
Street 



* 



ELECTRIC FIXTURES 

in your residence at Colorado Springes 
same price as Denver, without extra 
charge. Call and select your fixtures^ 
or will send you a catalog"ue. 



DENVtR, 
COLO. 




m 

R0UTE 



"THE LINE THAT SUITS THEM ALL." 

INOW, JUST REMEIVIBt^R 

That the shortest, best and quickest line between Cripple Creek, Leadville, 
Aspen, Salt Lake and the West is Via 

The Colorado Midland Railway 

*'It's the Midland Route that's Popular 

R. T. DUNAWAY, C. P. A., Colorado Springs. 
C. H. SPEERS. H. C. BUSH, 

Gen. Pass. Agent. Traffic Manager. 

810 17th Street, Denver. 



Our Microscopes, Microiomes, Laboratory Glass- 
ware^ Chemical Apparatus, Cliemicals, Piioto 
Lenses and Siiufters, Field Glasses, Projection 
Apparatus, Plioto-Micro Cameras are used by| 
the leading Lab- 1^^^^^_ oratories and 
Gover'nt Dep'tsH^^^R^ Round the World | 



MICRO #S[OPK 



Catalogs 



Bausch & Lomb Opt. Co. 

-) Rochester, N. Y. 

New York Chicago Boston Frankfurt, Gy j 



ST. JOHN & BARNES 

Oldest and largest plumbing and heating 

tstablishment in city. Your 

patronage solicited 



Telephone 13 



206 N. Tejon St 



Coal $2.00 per ton. 
Tudor Co8l1 Co., 

Cor. Cascade dLivd CxichdLrras. ejels 



^ XOcLgon Load of ^^ ^< 

New Wood Type 

Of the -Very Latest at your DisposalJ^or 

WiTvdow Cacrds 
Tickets, Flyers etc 

B J^ G 'RA V I jsr G — U he Finest 

TKc Tele^rapK Job Rooms use, p. p. Ave. 

Ask wKere TKe Tiger is Printed 



Clearance Sale Continues 

Until our new store is ready. 

Furniture, Carpets, Curtains, Etc. 

At 120 So. Tejon St. 

The FRED S. TUGKER 
Furniture eompany. 



Colorado School of Scientific Physical Culture. 

THOS. R. DALY. 410 Mining Exchange Building. PHONE RED 1821, 



THE TIGER. 



El Paso Cleaning & Tailoring Co, Pressing Dyeing Altein^ 

10 E. Kiowa St. Phone Main 667=A Colo. Springs Cleaning Repairing Tailoring 



The 



Hasseil Iron Works Co. 

Founders and Machinists 



Office Phone 309-B 



Residence Phone Red 871 



DR. HARRY L MOREHOUSE 



DENTIST 



Hours 9-12, 1:30-5 



First N t'i Banii BIdg., room 8 



C. F. Arcularlus & Co. 



Jewelers 



Diamonds and Watches 

Fine Jewelry Manufacturing 

9 South Tejon St. Coiorado Springs 



JOHIN MOFFAT 

Tine Cailoring 

Repairing, Cleaning, Pressing. Special rates to 
College Students 

Over Waliing's Book Store 16 South Tejon St. 

Denver Law School 

Law Department of the 
University of Denver 

Three years' course leading to the degree of 
Bachelor of Laws. Courses in Mining and Irri- 
gation Law. Full resident faculty. Foi informa- 
tion address 

LUCIUS W. HOYT, Dean 

Ernest & Cranmer BIdg., Denver, Colo. 




Tt^g^ill Pay Vcu 

TO TAKE YOUR MEALS AT 

Cbe mcKae Cafe< 

OPEN NIGHT AND DAY. 

Dining Booths: Private Dining Room. 

Hall Entrance, 105-107 Pike's Peak Avenue. 



Monarch Hand Laundry. 

421 S. Tejon Phone 540 

KARL L. MOHLER, Prop. 

W. J. WALLRICH, College Agt. 

WE LaUNDER HNYTHING 

The Colorado Teachers' Agency, 

FRED DICK, Manager, 

1543 Glenarm St. DENVER, COLO. 

We assist competent teachers to desirable positions and 
recommend teacliers to school boards. 

FINE CHOCOLATE BON BONS 



Name on every Piece 

Ice Cream, Hot and Cold 

Sodas 

Tresh Candies madeexery hour 



UNION ICE AND COAL COMPANY 

W. M. BANNING, Prop. 




Coal» mood and Tee 

Dealers in all kinds of Coal and Artificial and 
Natural Ice 

Yard Office, 105 W. Vermijo Ave. City Office, 5N. Tejon 



Did You Know 

That our stock of package crackers is sa 
great in its variety that you could have a 
change for every day for more than twa 
months and yet not exhaust our list? Well, 
it's a fact. We have a kind for every pos- 
sible time and occasion — and they are all 
good. Finest bakery goods in the city. 
Fancy Groceries 

W. N. BURGESS, tl2 N. Tejon St. 

Titsworth & Davidson 
DAIRY 

2 MILES S. E. OF CQLORADO SPRINGS. P. 0. BOX 6 

The Hoflck-Davidson Coal and Transfer Co. 

Dealers In 

CANON CITY, MAITLAND 

AND LIGNITE COAL 

Phone 473-B. Office US N. Tejon. P. O. Box 257 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 



♦ ♦♦♦•I*4*4*4*4'<»4>«l'4"i*4'4>4*«4>4*<l'«4*4>4**i>4**i'<i'4i4>4>4'4'4*4>*»4'«»«4>4'4'4*4' 

* ^ . ♦ 

4* 




* See 



^he Gowdy-Simmons Printing Con\pany 

FOR WINDOW CARDS, TICKETS, ETC. ENGRAVED 
CARDS AND INVITATIONS ON SHORT NOTICE 



2/ 7/orth 
TJejon Si, 



^ Phone Main 151 Established 1897 

♦ D. W. SMITH, 






FAMILY GROCER, TEA AND 
COFFEE MERCHANT . : : : : 
Orders Called for and Promptly Delivered 

717 N. Weber St. Colorado Springs, Colo. 



♦ 
•I* 

♦ 

THE DERN TEA AND COFFEE CO. X 

Dealers in TEAS, COFFEES, SPICES, * 

EXTRACTS. BAKING POWDERS, Etc. t 



Phone 575 



29 S. Tejon St. . 



The People's Gtocety and Matket 



PHONE MAIN 868 




♦ S. JAMES & SON, Props. 

♦ 



222 EAST PIKE'S PEAK 

Colorado SpringSt Colorado 






fii^' 



!P/iotoffraphs 



at BINGHAM & WOOD'S. 18 S. Tefon 



GREENHOUSES: Cor. Platte and Wasatch. 

J. B. Braidwood, 

spccEssoBTo WILLIAM CLARK, 

Florist. 



Established 1873. 

PHONE 28. 



"Robinson'' 
Lrunvp Coal 

If You Havcn^t Burned It in Your 
Furnace You Don^t Know How 
Warm Your House Can Be» 

The Coloirado Springs 

X^Uei VrfO# Thone^ 230—213 

"j\f the ^ign of ihe 'Red Men" 




(Ask your dealer for 

VICTOR 

Athletic 
Supplies 

HELP THE TIGER 

by buying 

Scott Bicycle Tbes 

Write 0S if yea cannot get them of 
yo0r dealer. 

THE SCOTT SUPPLY & TOOL CO. 

DENVER, COLO. 



USE ELECTRIC LIGHT 
IN YOUR HOMES 



The Colorado Springs Electric Co. 



♦ 

4* 
4* 
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4* 
♦ 

* 
4> 






♦ ♦ 4* ♦ 4* 4* •!» «» ♦ •» •fi •!*♦ 4» ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ 4i ♦ ♦ ♦ 4»4> 4* 4»«l> ♦ 4* ♦ 4* 4* 

The Yomn^ Meti^s Stof*c* 



4* 4> ♦ 4* 4> 4» 4> 

4» 



All the SpHng Styles 
in Hats 



♦ 

4* 
4* 
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♦ 
4* 

t SPECIAL DISCOUNT 
{ TO ALL STUDENTS 



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are to be seen at our store just now. Styles particularly suitable for ^ 

College Young Men. We make a leader of a $3.00 Hat, which we show - 

more styles of than any other quality. * 

HOLBROOK & PERKINS t 



STVDENTS 

A word with you regarding your clothes. Have you enjoyed the pleasure of having 
your clothes made to your order? You would prefer to have them made to your order, pro- 
viding they would not col^t any more than what you have been paying for hand-me-downs. 
We are making a special offer this week: 

Suits and Overcoats to Order for Only $20.00. 
100 Styles to Select From. 

ILOYALr TAILrORINO CO. 

113 NortK TejoA Si. 

A. H. WHAITE & COMPANY, 



Men^s and Boys^ Outfitters. 



♦ J 8 and 20 South Tcjon Street. 



♦ 
♦ 

4* 
* 




SNAPPY STYLES 

in Fine Shoes for young people. No! 
You don't have to pay more for them 
than for the ordinary kind. 



\fe>^tv&5 



SHOES^HAT^ATISFY 



22 S.TEJON ST. 




O. E. HEMENWAY 



Groceries and Meats 



U5 South Tejon St* 
Colorado Springs^ Colorado 




4i4i4ii»4i4i4.4i4i4i4i«ii4i4.4i4i4*4'<i*4>«f>*i*4>4*4>4'4>*i**i>4i«i*4*4*4*«<i*«f4>«l>4'4'*l>4*4*<f'4> 







£H£ TIGBR 



N 



Colorado College 




/ 




FGBRVAILY 9tK, 1905 

VOI^\lME, VII. J^umber 19. 



s 



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4>4'4>4*4>4»4*4>4>4'4*4*4»4*4*4*4*4>4*4*4*4*4*4»4*4*4*4*4*4*4*4*4*4*4>4*4>4'4>4>4*4**»4» 



Special Rates to Students 

On Rented Pianos 




The KNIGHT - eHMPBELL 
Music Sompany 



Kew Lennox Block 



Opposite North Park 



St. John Bros-r"'"'"'"""™' 

Gas and Steam Fitters 

Hot Water Heating a Specialty 

Prompt attention given to Repair Work. 

gurtis g oal go. 

Office 132 N. Tejon St. Telephone 91. 

Try "NEW RANGE" for the Kitchen, $4.00. 
BiTUMNOUS Coal at Standard prices. 



SELDOMRIDGE BROTHERS, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

Fioart Feed, Grain, Hay and Seeds 

108 South Tejon Street 



REPAIRING WHILE YOU WAIT! 
Gents' Sewed Soles, 75c; with Heels, $1.00. 
Ladies' Sewed Soles, 65c; with Heels, 90c. 

ALL WORK GUARANTEED AT 

The Lightning Shoe Shop 

2854 North Tejon Street. 

Visiting Cards in Latest Styles. 

WE SHOW gy advertising in THE TiGER that we 
illll........... appreciate your custom. 

/^^ 22 E. Kiowa St. The Prompt Printerj 

NEW : EMPrRE : THEATRE 

lOc VAIDEVILLE -lOc 

3— SHOWS DAILY— 3 
I Matinee, 3 p. m. Evenings, 7:30 and 8:45. 



Elegant 

PK/\4/ikc^ Artistic in Posing, 
1 liUlUd Lighting and Finish 

Discount to Students 




ii97«fiay 



Phone 679-a 
Corner Cascade and Kiowa 



COLLEGE GOWNS, CAPS 

The Best Workmanship 
at Lowest Prices 

Silk Faculty Gowns and Hoods 



COX SONS & VININe 

262 Fourth Avenue., NEW YORK 




SKATES 

Hockey Sticks 

S5iSWEaTERS 

Basket Ball and 
Y. M. e. H. Suits 

at Strangs 

119 North Tejon Street 

Mueth's 

Soda, Ice eream 

eHTERING 

CHAS. T. FERTIG 

lieal Estate, Loans and Insurance 

29 N. Tejon Street 

ZjAe Colorado Sprmffs Jfiorai Co, 

FLORISTS 



/O^ ^^or-tA ZT^/OM Stramt 



4* 
♦ 

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i DOVGLAS est HCTHSILINGTON ; 

^ Phone 556-B Rooms 15-16 Outwest Building, Colorado Springs, Colo. J 

4>4>4'«»4*4*4>4>4'4*4i4>*»4>4>4>«»4*4*4>4*4*4i4*4*4i4*4*4*4i4*4»4>4»4>4>4*4'4>4*4>4i4>4>4>4i 



THB TIGER 



Student's Book Store 



and Watch Fobs, 
and up. 



Books, Stationery; all Engi- 
neer's Supplies; College Pins 
Centi/ry Fountain Pens $1 to $4, Waterman's $2.50 

REYER & PLATT. 



For $1.00 per month ' ^"'^ Sponged and Pressed each week 

«™«™«.1L™™™ „„ PANTATORIUM 

17 East Bijou, Branch Office opp. Plaza Hotel. 



THE COLORADO SPRINGS CO. 

The Original Locators of 

Colorado Springs and '7//anitou 

is still offering for sale choice 
lots on North Weber Street 
and North Wahsatch Avenue 

Also lots for sale in other parts of Colorado Springs 
and in Mnnitou 

Apply at ROOA/18, OUTWEST BUILDING 

LOUIS STOeK 

Office and Works, 13 E. Kiowa St. 

TELEPHONE 452-A 

Cleaning, Dyeing, Scouring in all its branches 

Ostrich Plumes Cleaned, Dyed and Curled 

Kid Gloves Dyed and Cleaned. 



GIDDINGS BROS. 



Fine Dress Goods and Ladies' 
Tailor Suits, Ladies' 

FUl^NISHINGS 



Kiowa and Tejon Streets. 



We do Everything in the Tailoring 
Line 

J. B. CORRIN 

103 E. Bijou St. COLORADO SPRINGS, COLO. 

D. E. MONROE & CO. 
Prescription Druagist 

The best of Drugs, Stationery and Toilet Articles 

NO LIQUORS SOLD. 
eor. Teioti ^ Bifou Phone 311 9( 331 

THE HEFLEYARCULARIUS DRUG CO. 
Druddists 

Kodaks, Cameras and all kinds of Photographic 
Supplies. Developing and Printing for Amituers. 
Free Delivery. 
Phone 144 2l South Tejon Street 



liardivarc Bicvclcs 

H. S. BLflKE 

New Chainless Bicycle $35 and $20 

Rambler, Orient and National Automobiles 

Best Repair Shop in city 107 n. Cefoti 



nirs* R* R* brooks 

Coilet Parlors at 20 east Kiowa 

Also Room 52, Antlers Hotel 

No Apprentices. Only experienced help employed. 



A COvlPLETE LNCYCLOPfDIA OF AVUTEIR SPORT 

SPALDINGS OFFICIAL ATHLETIC ALMANAC 

for 1905. Edited by J. E. Sullivan. 

(Chief of Department of Physical (;ulture, Louisiana 
Purchase Exi osition ) 
Should be read by every student, as it contains the re- 
cords of athlees and all amateu • events in this country 
and abroad. It also contains a complete review of the 
Olympic Games from the official report of Director Sul- 
livan and a resume of the two days devoted to sports in 
which savages were the only contestants, in which it is 
proved conclusively that savages are not the born ath- 
letes we liave heretofore supposed them to be. This is 
the first time in which the athletic performance of s v- 
ages have ever been systematically recorded. 

1 his is the largest Athletic Almanac ever published, 
containing 320 pages. Numerous illustrations of promi- 
nent athletics and track teams. 

RRICE, 10 CEINXS 
For sale by all newsde:»ler3 and 
A. G. «RALDiING & BROS. 
New York, Chicago. St. 1^' uis, Philadelphia, San Fran- 
cisco, Kansas City, Buffalo. Denver, Washington, Boston, 
Baltimore, Pittsburg, Minneapolis, New Orleans. Cin- 
cinnati, Syracuse, Montreal, Can., London, Eng. 
Send for a copy of Spalding's Athletic Goods 
Catalogue. It's free. 

limRY TAMM 

Druggist 

PRESCRIPTIONS 
TOILET ARTICLES 
STATIONERY 

All Popular Drinks Served 
at our Soda Fountain 

Plaza Hotel, Cor. Cache la Poudre & Tejon Sts. 



THE RUGBY=PRIMROSE COAL CO. 

ail Kinds of Fuel 

Phone 481-A West 44- A 21 N, TEJON ST. 



H.KK?\.\Z 



poReELaiN 
H. KRANZ & 



F. R. SMITH 



Only 8 Chair Barber Shop in the City 

lObV^ E. Pike's Peak Hve. 



BATH TUBS 

e©., Barbers 

Try the ! lectric Vibrassage Machine 

e©i-©Raoc> SPRINGS. ee5L©. 



r MB TIGER 



Only 


ine 


running 


tran>s 


throu 


gh 


Manitou 


and 


Victor en 


route 


to 




Cripple 


Creek 



NidldLiid Route 

Cripple Creek District 



50 

Miles 
Crowded 

with 

Matchless 

Scenery 



The Popular Throug-h Line between Denver, Colorado Spring" 
Pueblo and the Cripple Creek District. 



J. H. WATERS, 

Pres. and Gen'l Msrr. 



Cripple Creek, 
Colo. 



J. B. WIGGENHORN, 
G. P. A. 



FaMey Bl'OS. & Fail^Iey ^^^^ ^^ doubt, take the safe side. 

^ ^ * I Send bundles to the 

Farnitarc, Carpets, Stoves, | 

Tinware, China, Etc. eolorado Springs Laundry 



23 South Tejon Street, 



Est. 20 yrs. 



Ralph Rice, College Agt. 



Bookkeeping 
Shorthand 
Typewriting 



^- 



CENTRAL 



usiness 



College 



College Estab- 
lished in 
Denver in (887 



L. A. ARNOLD, Pres. J. C. CROY, Prin. 

Nichols Block, IS and 20 S. Tejon St., 
Colorado Springs, Cofo. 

Rooms inviting, Work thorough, Teachers up-to-date 

Call or Write for Information. 



205 N. Tejon sr 



C. W. WARSOP & CO., 

Draperies, Upholstery Goods, Furniture. Complete line of Screens, 
Pillows, Pillow Tops, Couch Covers, etc. 



The 50-mile-an-hour Wheel 


THE CRESCENT 


Reading Standard Bicycles 

SflEFF & RIGliS Opposite Flaza Hotel 


BOWLING ALLEYS 

115-117 North Cascade Ave. 




Prof. Chas. J. Hausdorf, 

TEACHER OF MANDOLIN, GUITAR AND BANJO. 

.V\usic furni-hed for weddings, receptions, enter- 
tainments, etc. 
Room 5, 1-2 E. Pike's Peak Ave. 


Telephone Main 863 
t. S. SOLLtNBERGlR, Mgr. 

Private Alleys for Ladies 
Eight Alleys on one Floor 
Special Rates to Parties and Clubs 


FRANK F. CRIMP 

FLORIST 

Phone 500 50Q E. Columbia St. 

Special attention given to Telephone Orders. 


H. E. BOATRIGHT 

^ubiic Stenographer 

33 GIDDIXGS l^LDG. 
Rates 6c per 100 words, 50c perhr. extra carbons oc per page 



THE TIGER 



WHEN IN NEED OE CLOTHING, HATS 
OR EIRNISHINGS 

We would suggest that you consult your 

professor as to the best place lo go. 

We are willing to abide by their 

judgement as they all trade 

with us. We give spe- 

ial discount to students 

The B. W. DAVIS CLOTHING & FUR- 
NISHING CO., 102 N. Tejon St. 



The Williafflson=Haffner 
Engraving Company 



1633 Arapahoe Street 



DENVER 



0r. 7l/, ^owier, 

DENTIST 



IS South TJejon St, 



G. W. Pauly, B. S., D. O. Mrs. Lona E. Pauly, B. S. D. O. 
Graduates of A. T. Still's College of Osteopathy, 



Rirksville.Mo. 



DR. & MRS. PAULY, ?|^y|?^iYn1'^ 

Office, rooms 303-301 DeGraff Bldg. 118 N. Tejon St., Colo- 
rado Springs, Colo. Ph. nes— Office Ked 1272; Res. Red 323 
Hours 8 to 12 a . m . , 1 to 5 p . m. 



F* H* Weeks 

26 East Bijou St. 

Photographs taken any hour 
of the day or evening by 
flashlight. Especially suit- 
able for groups. Call and see 
samples. 

Special R.ates tj Students 



next 



You are next to a good hair cut or shave when you patronize 



The Manhattan Barber Shop, J. R. WEYMAR, Prop. 3o e. bijoi 



10 per ct. Discount 

On All Boots and Shoes 
To College Students 

(Ladies' Queen Quality excepted. J 

WHITAKER & GARDNER 

30 N. TEJON ST. 


^.-Air^TAUNDl^V 


THE STAR is the leader for prompt 
and satisfactory service. 

SPECIAL RATES to students of col- 
lege and academy 

S. E. BENNETT, College Ag't. 


CHARLES P. BENNETT 


w. I. Lueas 


Real Estate, Loans 
and Insurances^ e^ 

NO. 5 PIKE'S PEAK AVENUE 


Columbia, Hartford, Rambler, Ideal & Tribune Bicycles 

The only first-class re^ air shop in town. Chainless wheels 
a specialty. Wheels for rent. Phone 517- A. 1 29 N. Tejon 

Students wishing a Special Course in Drawing, 
Water Colors, Oil or China Paintings should call 
at Art Studio, io8 N. Tejon MARIE R. FORBISH, 
Member of Art Institute, Chicago. 



64 



Hart, Schaffner & Marx Clothing. 

Paraqon" Trousers. ^^Mi2}£> Hawes & Guyer Hats 



THE TIGBR. 



DR. SCHADT 

SPECIALTY "PRACTICE 

The Scientific Examination of your eyes and fitting of 
glasses. Special Discount to students. Consultation free. 
Office — 303 Colorado Bldg., corner Tejon and Huerfano Sts. 

Zehner Jewelry Co^^ 

26 Pikers Peak Avenue. 

CTI |r|F\IT^_-_ We have a fine assortment of goods 
O I ULFLI^ I C3 on ^and. CALL AND SEE THEM. 

We sell a GOOD FOUNTAIN PEN for $i 

WHITNEY & GRIMWOOD 

Opera House Building 

We are agents for WATERMAN'S IDEAL FOUNTAIN 
PENS. Prices from $2.50 up. 



f^reci S. J^ai/ner 

Watchmaker and Jeweler 

15 South Xjejon St, 




lOOOWORTH 



A. 



(ofiTac''^'-''5 



1739 Champa St., DENVER, COLO. 



THE COLORADO ROAOT 




^'^f-tOfliSouwt** 



Come in and a>sK. que^iion4! 



"Frenzied Finance" does not include invest- 
ments in Colorado & Southern Railway tickets, 
but on the other hand you are certain of good 
returns, w^hich are bound to please and satisfy 
you. 



Avoid the last moment's worry, caused by pur- 
chasing; tickets at Depot, by coming- in at the New 
city office, No. 119 E. Pike's Peak, and let us fix 
you out the day before. Money back if ticket is 
not used. Remember that. 

J. H. Springer, 
Commercial Ag;ent. 



The 



Crissey & Fowler Lumber 
Company 



Phone 101 



117 to 123 West Vermijo Ave. 




Carriages, Cabs, 

'Busses, Baggage and 

Transfer Wagons 

Office, 15 North Cascade 



FRANK H, SMALL watches, Diamonds, fine Watch Work. Special 
Jeweler and Silversmith P^i^^ to Students. 113 Pike's Peak Ave. 



Vol. VII. 



Zhe TlOCIt 



COLORADO COLLEGE, FEBRUARY 9, 1905. 



No. 19 



Meeting of the Intei^coIIegiate Athletic 
Association 







E. V. PAINTER, 

Captain of the Track Team. 

The regular annual meeting of the Colorado 
Intercollegiate Athletic Association was held in 
Denver at the club house of the Denver Ath- 
letic Club on last Saturday. Lennox, Hester. 
Wasley, Johnston and McClintock represented 
Colorado College. 

The most important action taken at the meet- 
ing was the adoption of the one-year-residence 
rule, wdiich provided that no man can compete 
in games of the Association who has the year im- 
mediately preceding taken part in intercollegiate 
athletics in any other college. An exception is 
made in case of men who have graduated from 
college and are taking up post-graduate courses. 
This rule does not exclude men who have just 
entered college from high school. 

Denver University objected strenuously to 
adopting this rule before Jan. i, 1906, on the 
ground that it would greatly injure the standard 
of athletics in this state. If it is true that it will 
do so, it simply shows that certain colleges have 
been depending upon men who can be induced to 
change from one college to another. This rule 



V ould have excluded Caley, Karnopp, Roberts, 
Mauff, and Smith from playing with the State 
University last year. It is also significant that 
this rule, regarded as the surest guard against pro- 
fessionalism, was adopted at the first meeting- 
after the State University left the league, although 
proposed several times before. 

There was considerable trouble over the adop- 
tion of the football schedule for next year. Col- 
orado College went to the meeting with the un- 
derstanding that the Mines had promised to play 
the Thanksgiving game in Colorado Springs next 
Fall. However, Denver University and the Mines 
had come to an agreement, previous to the meet- 
ing, to play a Thanksgiving game in Denver. 
After wrangling over this question for six hours 
Colorado College was at last forced to withdraw 
its protest to prevent getting an even poorer 
schedule. The Mines promised to play in Colo- 
rado Springs on Thanksgiving, 1906. 

Basket-ball was adopted as one of the league 
sports and the State Normal School was ad- 
mitted to Track Athletics. 

The following schedules were adopted : 

EOOTBAEE. 

Nov. 4. — Aggies vs. Colorado College at Colo- 
rado Springs. 

Nov. II. — Denver University vs. Colorado Col- 
lege at Colorado Springs. 

Nov. 18. — Mines vs. Colorado College at Colo- 
rado Springs. 

EGOTBALL. 

Oct. 14. — Aggies vs. Mines at Fort Collins. 

Nov. 4.^ — Aggies vs. Tigers at Colorado Springs. 

Nov. II. — Denver vs. Tigers at Colorado 
Springs. 

Nov. 18.— Mines vs. Tigers at Colorado Springs. 
Aggies vs. Denver at Denver. 

Nov. 30.— Mines vs. Denver at Denver. 



Apr. 8. — Mines vs. Denver at Denver. 
Apr. 15. — Mines vs. Tigers at Colorado Springs. 
Apr. 22. — Aggies vs. State Normal at Fort 
Collins. 

Apr. 29. — Denver vs. Tigers at Denver. 
]\Iay 9.— State Meet at Denver. 



THE T IGBR. 



BASEBAI.I.. 

Apr. I. — Tigers vs. Ft. Logan — probably. 

Apr. 8. — Tigers vs. Sacred Heart at Colorado 
Springs. Mines vs. Aggies at Golden. 

Apr. 15. — Tigers vs. Mines at Colorado Springs. 

Apr. 22. — Tigers vs. Aggies at Fort Collins. 

Apr. 29. — Tigers vs. Mines at Golden. 

May 6. — Mines vs. Aggies at Fort Collins. 

May 13. — Tigers vs. Aggies at Colorado 
Springs. 

May 20. — Tigers vs. Fort Logan at Denver. 



WHY THE FRESHMEN 
SHOULD HAVE A 
CLASS PRAYER MEETING 

At the beginning of the year the Juniors or- 
ganized a prayer meeting to which they invited 
the Freshmen. The meetings, held each Sunday- 
evening in Ticknor Study, were arranged and 
conducted by the Juniors. At first the meet- 
ings were well attended, both b}^ Juniors and 
Freshmen, but gradually the attendance decreased 
until there were left but half a dozen Juniors and 
a score of Freshmen. Such a state of affairs 
was fatal, something must be done, either the 
meetings must be given up or else there must be 
a radical change. Could we afford to give them 
up? They meant much for the sympathy of the 
two classes — much to the individuals taking part 
in them. How far this influence may have 
reached or how much it may have meant to the 
College could not yet be told. Yet on account of 
the deepening of the individual spirituality the 
meetings ought not to be abandoned. 

We owe much to the Juniors, yet now that 
we have their training and are stronger in num- 
bers than they, shall we still- depend upon their 
control and guidance? There are perhaps 
twenty Freshmen thoroughly interested in the 
meetings. Before now, fewer than twenty have 
started movements that have moved nations — yes, 
continents. Our cause is worthy, and we have 
no right to shirk this responsibility, for whose ac- 
complishment we have plenty of power. There 
is no reason why, a month hence, our number 
should not be multiplied several times, and the 
spirit of our class characterized as distinctively 
religious. 

The need of the meeting has been shown, but 
the advisability of another organization for per- 
sons already belonging to half a dozen is to be 
questioned. There are many reasons why a class 
Christian Endeavor Society — or similar organ- 
ization — would not be practicable. Organization 
there must be, of some form, to secure stability ; 
but let it be as simple and obscure as possi- 
ble ; so that the machinery of the organiza- 
tion shall not hide the purpose of our assem- 
bling-^to deepen the spiritual life of our class. 



Let the rules be few and simple, so that we 
shall be governed by individual responsibility, 
rather than restricted by distasteful rules. But 
let the meeting be of the sort to be a fitting 
climax to a quiet Sabbath ; a place vvdiere we may 
have communion with God, and speak freely of 
the things of the inner life. 

The meetings should belong to the class, for 
there are many of our members who go to no 
prayer meeting ; who have felt no interest in a 
union service, and upon whom we have not felt 
the responsibility of urging such a service. Our 
class has no tie which is distinctive of the col- 
lege ideal. These meetings ought to promote the 
religious life of the college, not only by the 
spiritual strengthening of the individuals, but 
also by our example as a class. Many, because 
of the lack of such an organization, have joined 
the local young people's societies, and have been 
making the acquaintance of town people, when 
they do not know their own classmates; and have 
been dragging a part of the outside world into a 
life already replete with duties and responsibili- 
ties. 

The Freshmen should have a prayer meeting 
to strengthen their own lives and uphold the Col- 
lege standard. This can be accomplished, though, 
only by the help and co-operation of each mem- 
ber of the class. Let us then severally, but all 
standing together, undertake this thing, and prove 
that the class of '08 can win in the highest sense. 

A. A. M. 



^THE ANNUAU' 

You may expect the managers of the Annual 
to call upon you for a subscription in the near 
future. Remember that it is your duty to help 
support this publication, just as much as it is your 
duty to help support your literary society or the 
athletics of the College. In many ways the An- 
nual is more representative than any of these. 
It is an illustrated review of the whole year, em- 
bracing ev^ry phase of student life, and as such, 
it is the one thing which, more than anything else, 
can bring back college memories. After you have 
gone out from college you will never regret the 
possession of this book, which will do so much 
to keep before you the recollection of your friends 
and classmates, and which will tend to bind your 
college life together. 

The Junior class does all the work and you 
will not be expected nor asked to do more than 
what your duty calls for. For every Annual you 
buy you will get value received, together with a 
guarantee of perfect satisfaction or the money re- 
funded. The price is $1.50, or 25% below cost. 



"How do you like that shaving soap? 
"Best I ever tasted." 



THE TIGER 



'HOME, SWEET HOME" 



ETHICAL ADDRESS 



Do you begin to feel those strange little thrills 
in your heart about the first of November? Does 
it give little jumps when you say to yourseH, 
"Only six more weeks and I'll Ije home!" Well, 
n:aybe you are not a girl, and a school-girl. Jf 
you are, you know all about these queer little 
movements around your heart. 

As the days pass by and oh, they do go so 
slowly ! — you check them off one by one in your 
mind; or perhaps you must have some visible 
means of convincing yourself that time really is 
n-ioving, so you mark off on the calendar each 
clay as it passes, or tear off one of the string of 
paper dolls that hangs beside your dresser. But 
finally, though you sometimes thought it never 
would arrive, comes the happy day when you rush 
through the halls crying, "Girls ! Girls ! To- 
morrow I'm going home. Going home ! Just 
think of it!" 

Then you get your trunk packed somehow, be- 
tween classes, after the ten o'clock bell has rung, 
and at odd moments. Of course things are not 
put in very neatly. But then, your mother will 
crily laugh and say: "You never will learn to 
pack a trunk-." At last you do get to sleep, though 
you are so excited you could have stayed up all 
night. When you wake up, the day has come. 
^ ou rush to tlie girls' rooms and kiss them all 
good-by and hope they will all have as lovely a 
time as you are going to have. Four or five of 
tliem go down with you to the train and you 
kiss them all again and wish them a Merry Christ- 
mas ! 

At last you are comfortably settled and the 
train starts. You have to ride only a few hours, 
so you amuse yourself by watching the houses and 
towns along the road, and think that next time 
you go over this road you will not be feeling so 
happy. After a while you get tiresome looking 
out of the window and begin to watch the peo- 
ple in the car. You wonder if any of them are 
going home, too, for Christmas. Pretty soon you 
look at your watch for the tenth time and see 
that in eight minutes you will be there ! You 
see that curve in the railroad and you begin to 
put on your coat and gloves and to hunt for your 
pocketbook. Now the train has passed around the 
curve, and you can see the big hill and the court 
house and the school buildings and the clump of 
trees where your house is. You are out on the 
steps almost before the train has stopped. 

There they are, coming down the platform to 
meet you, your mother and your little sister and 
brother. And there is your big brother striding 
down the street! Isn't it good to be home again'-' 
"Be it ever so humble, there's no place like home." 

Where there's a will there's a law^suit. — Ex. 



Last Friday Dr. Slocum took for the subject 
of his ethical address: "Fineness in Moral Per- 
ception." The subject was taken up by first re- 
ferring to the responsibility of the college man. 
The very fact that a student is in ccjilege testifies 
to his ambition to be a leader in the world. And 
the very fact that a man. is college-bred gives 
him a prestige and a responsibility greater by far 
than that of the man with the untrained mind. 
Since the college man has had great opportunities 
he should be a leader and especially in his atti- 
tude toward moral questions, for the attUudc 
toward such questions is the real test of character. 
Moral attitude depends very much on education. 
We should not expect the man bred in a vicious 
environment to have clear moral perception. But 
the man bred in a home of refinement and trained 
in a college where tliere is character in both fac- 
ulty and student body is expected to maintain a 
proper attitude toward all questions of life. 

Then Dr. Slocum referred to some of the 
thoughtless things of which students are guilty 
and developed the thought that, considering char- 
acter the goal toward which we should strive, 
every offense against society is much more an 
offense against ourselves. The liar deceives him- 
self most; the thief steals most from himself; and 
the selfish man conmiits the greater wrong against 
himself. 

Dr. Slocum concluded his address with an ap- 
peal to the students to stri\-e for this fineness of 
perception — not to be ordinary but to be choice — 
to live on the higher plane. It is character wdiicii 
makes the successful life for wdiich all should 
strive. 



The girl who flirts with a featherless young 
gosling until he doesn't know whether he is float- 
ing in a sea of champagne to the sound of celes- 
tial nuisic, sliding down a greased rainbow, or 
riding on the ridge pole of the aurora borealis, and 
then tells him she can only be a sort of Christ- 
mas present, opera ticket sister to him ; who steals 
liis unripe affections and then allows them to get 
frost bitten, and then carries him into the empyre- 
an of puppy-love, only to drop him down with a dull 
plunk that fills his heart with compound fractions 
— well, she cannot be indicted for petty larceny 
nor prosecuted for cruelty to animals, but she is 
building for herself such a character that the un- 
fortunate devil who gets her will wish that he had 
postponed that event until after he had reached 
hea\"en, where there is neither marriage nor giv- 
ing in marriage. — Exchange. 

It was an Irish philosopher who said : "Idle- 
ness clothes a man with nakedness." — Christian 

Work. 



The tiger 



THE TIGER. 

Published weekly during the College year by 
The Tiger Publishing Co., in the interest of Colo- 
rado College. 

J. Y. Crothers Editor-in-Chief 

T. Hunter Assistant Editor-in-Chief 

J. I. Muffley Athletic Editor 

Miriam Carpenter Literary Editor 

Mabel Barbee Alumni Editor 

A. H. Fisher Local Editor 

Bert Wasley Business Manager 

C. A. Hedblom .... Assistant Business Manager 

CORRESPONDENTS: 

Mr. Nash, Miss McDowell, Miss Isham, Miss 
Kidder, Mr. Lamb, Mr. Reeks, Miss Arbuckle. 

Subscription, $1.25 per year, payable in advance. 
Single copy, 5 cents. 

The Tiger is forwarded to all subscribers until 
ordered discontinued and all arrearanges are paid. 

Students, Professors -and Alumni are invited 
to contribute literary articles, personals and items. 
Contributions must be accompanied by the writer's 
name. 

Address all communications to The Tiger, 
Colorado College, Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Entered at the Postoffice at Colorado Springs, 
Colo., as second-class matter.